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7 Jul 2014

IMG_2876

by petemills.blogspot.com

An Arduino, some addressable LED’s, a bluetooth module, code and a 3D printer come together to make blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer. blueShift is so named for the Bluetooth protocol used for data communication, and the use of a tachometer to indicate when to shift your car. It may be amusing to note that the driver and passengers traveling in this car would observe Blueshift when peering thru the windscreen, provided their velocity was sufficient.

blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer - [Link]

6 Jul 2014

We’ve again reached record attendance of our webinar! More than 100 registered patricipants and 4 winners of Weller products.

Last webinar before summer was dedicated to Weller. Rudolf Horl from Weller prepared interesting information about new soldering station WSD81i, as well as other information about various functions or tips concerning care about soldering station and tips.

Record from SOS webinar – Mastership in soldering - [Link]

6 Jul 2014

tachometer-using-arduino

praveen @ circuitstoday.com writes:

Tachometer is a device used for measuring the number of revolutions of an object in a given interval of time. Usually it is expressed in revolutions per minute or RPM. Earlier tachometers purely mechanical where the revolution is transferred to the tachometer through mechanical coupling (cable or shaft) , the rpm is determined using a gear mechanism and it is displayed on a dial. With the advent of modern electronics, the tachometers have changed a lot. This article is about a contactless digital tachometer using arduino. The speed of the motor can be also controlled using the same circuit. The RPM and all the other informations are displayed on a 16×2 LCD screen. The circuit diagram of the digital tachometer using arduino is shown below.

Tachometer using arduino - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

Lat

Michael Dunn @ edn.com writes:

Whether engineer, hobbyist, or maker, we’ve happily watched as chipmakers and third parties alike have come to their senses in recent years and cooked up a smorgasbord (smorgasboard?) of low-cost microcontroller devboards – in some cases, very low cost, like TI’s $4.30 MSP430 board. More recently, we’ve seen ARM Cortex kits for $10-$50, the flowering of the whole Arduino ecosystem, and of course, the Raspberry Pi, starting at $25. It’s microcontroller heaven.

Those of us wanting a cheap “in” to the FPGA world have been less lucky. But the times, they are a changin’. Many FPGA devkits, from both chipmakers and third parties, have broken – or downright shattered – the $100 barrier, opening the door to low-cost FPGA prototyping, education, hobby projects, and so on.

Follow me as I explore this brave new world of affordable FPGA learning and design. I’ve acquired a representative selection of bargain-priced boards, and will be reviewing each, not just on paper, but by actually creating projects with it.

FPGA boards under $100: Introduction - [Link]


5 Jul 2014

Hydra-X is a development platform which is feature-rich, scalable, and easy to use.

The Hydra-X is based on the Power Application Controller (PAC)™ family of ICs. Hydra-X gives you the ability to execute your own code on a 32-bit ARM Cortex core, paralleled with analog resources such as multi-mode power manager (for AC-DC, DC-DC power management), configurable Analog Front-End (AFE), data converters (1 MHz 10-bit ADC, 2 precision DACs), 52 V, 72 V, 600 V gate drivers, and open drain drivers, to name a few.

With up to 14 PWM timing functions, you will find it hard to run out of timing resources. Fully configurable into PWM, input capture or output compare, these timers are expanded by a dead time generator block; extremely useful when driving external FETs in a half H-Bridge configuration and a dead time needs to be imposed in order to protect the design from shoot-through.

Hydra-X10 and Hydra-X20 by Active-Semi Inc. - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

by superhouse.tv

Control physical devices using an Arduino based home automation controller that connects to your network and lets you switch things on and off using a web browser. This episode shows the construction sequence of a controller that combines an Arduino-compatible board, Power-over-Ethernet, and relay driver shields to create a self-contained controller that can serve up its own web interface so you can click buttons in your browser to turn devices on and off.

Building an Arduino home automation controller - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

Audio

by elektor.com:

STMicroelectronics’ has introduced a new digital audio processor with a >100 dB SNR and Dynamic Range. The device can process most digital input formats including 6.1/7.1 channel and 192 kHz, 24-bit DVD-audio and DSD/SACD. When configured in a 5.1 application its additional 2 channels can be used to supply audio line-out or headphone drive.

The STA311B is a single chip solution for digital audio processing and control in multichannel applications, providing FFXTM (Full Flexible Amplification) compatible outputs. Together with a FFXTM power amplifier it can provide high-quality, high-efficiency, all-digital amplification.

High Dynamic-Range Audio Processor - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

F5KSWEYHX42R7K7.MEDIUM

Solderdoodle is a portable, cordless, USB rechargeable soldering iron. Solarcycle @ instructables.com writes:

After learning how to use 3D printers, one of my friends asked if there was such a thing as a USB soldering iron and I said that I had instructions to build one, but the battery was external. I then realized that I could create my own case design on a 3D printer and put the battery, charge controller, and other parts inside as one single unit! It worked! .stp files for the case are provided below.

Solderdoodle: Open Source USB Rechargeable Soldering Iron - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

2-scientistsex

by Nancy Owano @ phys.org:

Thumb-size vacuum tubes that amplified signals in radio and television sets in the first half of the 20th century might seem nothing like the metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) that dazzle us with their capabilities in today’s digital electronics, say two scientists, but it might be time for fresh thinking about vacuum tubes and even some mashing-up for surprising results. Jin-Woo Han, research scientist, and Meyya Meyyappan, chief scientist for exploration technology, at NASA Ames Research Center in California, wrote an article that appeared in IEEE Spectrum on Monday, which details their explorations of a vacuum channel transistor. Their article indicates “vacuum channel transistor” is a phrase to watch in the context of what’s next in transistor technology. The what’s-next conversation is certainly one that continues.

Scientists explore mash-up of vacuum tube and MOSFET - [Link]

5 Jul 2014

What’s inside one of those omni-directional laser barcode scanners you use at the supermarket, and how does it work? Motorola / Symbol LS9208

EEVblog #637 – Omni Directional Laser Barcode Scanner Teardown - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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