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8 Apr 2014

Build this homemade “one-size-fits-most” speed controller for use with your hobby projects. It’s small, it’s flexible, and it’s built with off-the-shelf components around the venerable 555 timer IC.

Dial-a-Speed Motor Controller - [Link]

28 Jan 2014

valentine_front

This is a heart-shaped LED chaser would be a nice gift for Valentine’s Day. Circuit is very simple and uses the 555 timer IC (configured as astable multivibrator) and CD4017B decade counter.

The object of your desire will not be able to resist a heart-shaped LED chaser, lovingly hand-crafted on perfboard with a CD4017B decade counter and 555 astable. But you probably can’t go wrong with flowers and chocolates as well. Just to be on the safe side.

[via]

Heart-shaped LED chaser for Valentine’s Day - [Link]

 

17 Jan 2014

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Nick Leijenhorst build a 555 PWM circuit to dim his room LED lighting. He writes:

I wanted to dim my room LED lighting with a potentiometer, and decided on creating a solution from scratch to make it more fun and educative. I decided to go with the fairly well-known 555 PWM circuit. To decrease size and for learning purposes I decided on using surface-mount components for the first time. The reason I wanted to make this 555 PWM circuit is actually just to see if I could solder SMD components on home-etched PCB’s, and to see how hard it actually is.

[via]

Surface-mount 555 PWM circuit - [Link]

14 Dec 2013

Dave celebrates the classic 555 timer IC by building the Evil Mad Scientist “three fives” discrete timer kit. Some scope measurements and an explanation of the internal 555 timer circuitry follow.

EEVblog #555 – 555 Timer Kit - [Link]


15 Jun 2013

vfdfilamentdriver-600x450

Kerry Wong documented his VFD filament driver built:

I recently salvaged a vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) from a piece of old test gear. The VFD is a 13 digit 7-segment multiplexed display and I thought it would look great in a custom digital clock or something similar. While it has the model number FUTABA 13-MT-54NA, I could not find any information on the internet specifically for this model. Of course, before I could put this vacuum fluorescent display to use in my final project, I needed to first build a driver circuit to drive this display.

[via]

VFD filament driver using 555 - [Link]

4 Jun 2013

555-timer-triggers-phase-control-circuit-figure-1

JN Lygouras, University of Thrace writes:

The control circuit in Figure 1a allows you to manually adjust the power delivered to a load. By changing the setting of potentiometer R3, you change the phase angle at which the thyristor (Q3) fires (Figure 1b), thereby altering the load current’s duty cycle. The adjustment range is about 0 to 180°. Q3’s off time is linear with R3, but of course the resulting load power is not linear with R3.

555 timer triggers phase-control circuit - [Link]

4 Feb 2013

555CCLAB

Kennith needed a 1A constant current lead-acid battery charger for his HAM radios so he writes:

Since the SLAs are relatively small, and I only need them charged between radio outings, I opted to build a 1A constant current charger, based on the 555 Battery Charger which won first place in the 555 Design Contest Utility category. Using a 555 is a rather clever way to get two comparators and a Set-Reset latch in a single 8DIP package, which is needed for the high and low trip points. The major difference between my design and Mike’s is that instead of using a relay like him, I use an LM317 as a constant current source to limit my batteries charge rate.

555 based constant current lead-acid battery charger - [Link]

18 Dec 2012

This project is an all-digital-hardware LED Christmas tree we’re calling the Christmas Tree O’Digital Logic. The tree itself is composed of 64 LEDs built into a spiral sitting on a piece of protoboard. Underneath, the controller uses shift registers and a 555 timer to create two modes of display: a predictable pattern and a random pattern. This should light up any desk or shelf and bring merriment to you.

Christmas Tree O’Digital Logic - [Link]

11 Dec 2012

This is an all-digital-hardware Theremin. The Digital IR Theremin uses comparators, digital logic and a single 555 timer for tone generation to make it so that when you wave your hand in front of the infrared proximity sensor, it outputs a tone with varying pitch depending on how far away your hand is from the sensor!

Digital IR Theremin - [Link]

3 Sep 2012

Last month one of the unsung heroes of electronics has passed away. Hans Camenzind, father of one of the most famous integrated circuit of all times, the Signetics timer NE555, timed out at the age of 78. Being a gifted analog designer, Swiss-born Monsieur Camenzind is also credited to be the father of class-D amplifiers and he has introduced the concept of the Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) in ICs. During his rather productive career he designed over 140 ICs, wrote several books and many articles and his name is attached to some twenty patents.

When a famous artists dies you will hear his or her greatest hits on every radio or see his or her best films on every TV channel. Therefore, in respect of one of the great electronics inventors of our century we will play here Hans Camenzind’s most successful composition, NE555 in bipolar. [via]

Hans Camenzind, father of the NE555, dies at the age of 78 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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