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12 Jun 2012

www.changpuak.ch writes:

This GM-Counter is build on 2 PCB’s. One is a standard high Voltage generating circuit, whilst the second is a Counter based on an ATMega16™ which also handles serial Communication with a host (Environmental Control).

The High Voltage generator is based on a 100 Hz Chopper, which is build around a ’555′ in combination with a standard Transformer and a Cascade to achieve Voltages from 400 to approx 900 V. (adjustable) The Regulation is just on-off (Burst) which will result in approx 1% Drift. This Circuit consumes about 20 mA at a 9 V (Battery). (more when starting up :-)

Homebrew Geiger Müller Counter - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

Sean Breen entered his Digital die (74XX Family) into the Open 7400 Logic Competition – [via]

Here is a rather simple but practical use for digital electronics…..dice! (or in the case a single die)

Unlike many of the kits found online this one does not use a micro controller. The entire circuit is based around 74LSxx logic ICs and a 555 timer for a clock.

7400 competition entry: Digital die (74XX Family) - [Link]

1 Feb 2012

 

Arup wrote a guest post about his Nokia LCD breakout board:

I designed a simple Nokia LCD Breakout board which allows you to interface any Nokia 6100 compatible display to microcontroller like PIC and AVR. The board itself provides 6.8volts for the backlight by a simple boost converter built up using a common 555 timer IC. There’s a switch to choose whether you want to work with 5V logic, or with 3.3V logic. [via]

Simple Nokia LCD breakout board - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

Some time ago i uploaded a breathing LED circuit with the 555 timer chip. It became very popular and i received many comments and emails with people that made this circuit and worked fine, as well as comments with people that had troubles converting it to operate at 12 volts supply. It was designed to operate with 5 volts, because i plan to use it for a future PC mod. Since the PC power supply has 5 volts output, and since the LEDs that i plan to use require 3.8 volts to operate, choosing 5 volts for supply was the best choice to minimize power dissipation on the transistor.

Converting the original circuit to operate at 12 volts is not a big deal, but it requires some transistor knowledge. The only parts that should be changed were the biasing resistors R4 and R5. But i decided to take it one step further. I decided to make a more flexible breathing circuit. The new version as 2 more functions: It has an adjustable voltage oscillation amplitude, and an adjustable output DC offset. What this means is that it can be easily adjusted to operate with different LEDs. If for example the load is a 12V LED strip with operating voltage range 8 to 12 volts, the circuit can be adjusted to provide exactly this: 8 to 12 volts output. Similarly, it can be adjusted to operate with a high brightness LED that has voltage range from 2.4 to 3.8 volts.

Flexible 555 LED Pulsing (Breathing) Circuit - [Link]


23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

During this very long period that my PC went bad, i had the time to do many thing like finishing the PC case mod that i began like two years ago… So i connected the power button, the reset button and the audio controls. The rotary encoder will be used for my next project that will be a gigantic scriptable 8-channel PC fan controller.

Now, regarding the power button, it has a blue LED that light when the HDDs are operating (write or read process). The effect is very cool, but i want to make it cooler. I want the LED to blink when the HDDs are used, and when no Read/Write operation occurs i want the LED to breath. A breathing LED is the effect that the LED turns on and off by fading in and fading out, which gives the feeling of “breathing”…

A 555 Breathing (Pulsing) LED - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Rob writes in… [via]

I’ve seen quite a few hacks related to controlling appliances, lights, etc over the years and just wanted to share a little info so that everyone has access to a cheap way to do it relatively safely. By trade I work in the building controls/integration industry and as a result I use these relays at work and at home(chicken coop control,light,etc)quite a bit.

The interface between your microcontroller of choice and the relay is a simple 555 relay driver circuit. I have included the pdf that inspired me to do it this way. The relay I use is the RIBTU1C. The reason I prefer this relay is that the coil will run on 9VC @ 20mA and the contacts will switch 10A @ 120VAC. Total cost for the RIB and a 555 is under $15 if you shop around. In addition the RIB has a partition inside the box between the line and control sides. There’s also room for a Radio Shack breadboard in there!

Safety First! Switching 120vac loads with a microcontroller - [Link]

16 May 2011

ZeroTruths writes:

Something that a project that I’m working on has me doing is using a serial to parallel IC (think 74HC595) to control leds. However, rather than drive the leds directly from the pins, I opted for the use of transistors. After testing this out, it became apparent to me that perhaps the leds might be too bright, so I went in search of a simple PWM generator.

Yet Another Simple Pot-controlled 555 PWM generator – [Link]

29 Apr 2011

 

Jeri and Chris of the 555 contest have announced the results: [via]

Artistic
Randy Elwin — Le Domineux
Sergio Gonzalez — 555 Alien Sculpture
Jim Frize — 555 Synth Sequencer

Complex
Alan Yates — 555 Adding Machine
Alexis Kotlowy — 555 Pong-like DodgeBall Game
Jim Chen — 555 WhackAMole

Minimalist
Tom Jenner — 555 Servo Controller
Eric Schlaepfer — 555 AM Radio
Michael Noland — 555 Persistance of Vision

Utility
Michael Davis — Battery Charge Controller for Wind And Solar
Jonathan M Straub — PCB Etching Controller
Tom Jenner — 555 Servo Controller

Under 18
Valentin B — 555 Inductivity Meter

555 Contest Winners Announced – [Link]

5 Apr 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes: [via]

What’s in a name? David L. Jones of EEVBlog thinks he’s found an Easter egg in the performance characteristics of the 555 timer chip which reveals the basis of the “555″ in its name. Build his circuit (schematic at video 13:25), fire up the scope and see if you agree!

555 timer Easter egg? - [Link]

18 Mar 2011

Randomgarfield from fromorbit posted the above video, depicting his use of a 555 timer as a small oscillator tο clock CPLDs whіƖе debugging a small state machine. [via]

I needed a variable slow speed clock to help me debug a design I’m creating with a bunch of CPLDs. Given the current focus on the venerable 555 timer IC, I thought rather than using my usual AVR/PIC solution I’d create something with the handy little timer.

555 based FPGA/CPLD debugging oscillator - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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