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10 Mar 2012

Free online data conversion handbook from Analog Devices. It covers everything you’ll need to get started with analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters. It’s not just reference designs, but also theory on how various architectures function – [via]

The Data Conversion Handbook, edited by Walt Kester  (Newnes, 2005), is written for design engineers who routinely use data converters and related circuitry. Comprising Data Converter History, Fundamentals of Sampled Data Systems, Data Converter Architectures, Data Converter Process Technology, Testing Data Converters, Interfacing to Data Converters, Data Converter Support Circuits, Data Converter Applications, and Hardware Design Techniques, it may be the ultimate expression of product “augmentation” as it relates to data converters. The last chapter discusses practical issues, including common pitfalls and solutions related to the non-ideal properties of passive components.

App note: Analog and digital conversion handbook – [Link]

10 Feb 2012

Here is an app note from Microchip explaining how to interpret various analog to digital converter specifications. This article covers how attributes of ADCs are calculated and how they apply to it’s performance and precision –  [via]

The purpose of this application note is to describe the specifications used to quantify the performance of A/D
converters and give the reader a better understanding of the significance of those specifications in an application.

App note: Understanding ADC specifications and attributes – [Link]

8 Feb 2012

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is a simple application of internal 10-bit ADC (analog to digital converter) of PIC16F676 microcontroller.you can use this circuit to measure up to 30 v dc. the possible applications are on bench top power supply or as a panel meter in various system.

MICROCHIP’S PIC16F676 is the heart and brain of this circuit .the internal adc of the mcu with a resistor network voltage divider is used to measure the input voltage . then 3 digest of comm anode 7 segment display is used to display final converted voltage. as you can see in the schematic the displays are multiplexed with each other . means we switch on one display and put the corresponding digit on this while other two displays are off this cycle go for each of the display.

Panel Voltmeter Using PIC16F676 – [Link]

7 Feb 2012

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is a simple application of internal 10-bit ADC (analog to digital converter) of MSP430G2231 microcontroller.you can use this circuit to measure up to 30 Vdc. the possible applications are on bench top power supply or as a panel meter in various system.

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS MSP430G2231 is the heart and brain of this circuit .the internal adc of the mcu with a resistor network voltage divider is used to measure the input voltage . then 3 digest of comm anode 7 segment display is used to display final converted voltage. as you can see in the schematic the displays are multiplexed with each other . means we switch on one display and put the corresponding digit on this while other two displays are off this cycle go for each of the display.

MSP430 based 30V voltmeter – [Link]


7 Feb 2012

www.simpleavr.com writes:

This is a simple rf spectrum analyzer project based on TI Launchpad. i have been working on other rf transceiver projects and in need of a simple rf spectrum analyzer to help me visualize what’s happening.

This is a linux project, i had given attention with my best knowledge to make provisions so that it can be built under windows. however i do not have the time and resources to try out everything under windows.

I did successfully built and run the project under windows 7 w/ TI CCS IDE, for host visualization script, it also works under windows but required you to install some unixish packages (cygwin and more)

I need something simple to show the pattern of frequency hopping. i do not need very accurate display of rf power. the Launchpad came in handy as it is inexpensive and contains fast ADC functions. the included usb to uart is a plus as i can communicate data between the MCU application w/ a PC side application for visualization. there are around a dozen or so commands that you can issue via SPI to control the RFM12B, as well as sending and receiving data.

RFM12B Spectrum Analyzer – [Link]

31 Jan 2012

element14, Microchip and Matrix introduce the new PIC18 Flowcode Developers Kit.  Lowers the barrier to electronics design with easy to use Graphical Programming 

30 January 2012 – London, element14, the first collaborative global electronics community from Premier Farnell plc (LSE:pfl), has teamed up with Microchip and Matrix to introduce the new PIC18 Flowcode Developers Kit.  This innovative development and demonstration kit is designed to offer a hands-on, easy approach to electronics design using Flowcode, one of the world’s most advanced graphical programming languages for microcontrollers.

The development platform is based on a Microchip PIC18F26J50 low power, 8-bit PIC18F26J50 microcontroller, and is integrated with temperature sensor, capacitor touch sensor and potentiometer to help developers verify programs designed using Flowcode.

“The new PIC18 Flowcode Developers Kit is an innovative, fully featured yet low cost solution designed to help developers realize their designs in working hardware,” says Mike Powell, Technology Development Manager, Premier Farnell.  “Optimized for Flowcode development, the board has several expansion options, it can be used as a black box and is mounted with a PIC 18 device that is low power, but high performance.

The competitive advantage of Flowcode is that it allows those with little-to-no programming experience to create electronic systems in minutes. Flowcode supports code generation for the PIC® (PIC12, PIC16, and PIC18 series ), PIC24 and dsPIC® series of microcontrollers. The professional edition includes drivers for a range of sub-systems including LCDs, keypads, seven-segment displays, ADC and PWM, as well as communication protocols including I2C, SPI, RS-232RS-232, Zigbee and TCP/IP, among others.

Flowcode is compatible with Microchip’s PICkit programmer as well as third party programmers. It is also compatible with the HI-TECH C compiler. A ‘Lite’ version of Flowcode 4 is included in the kit.

For more information visit element14.

31 Oct 2011

This circuit is a digital sound level meter with a LCD screen, capable of displaying 80 characters (4 rows with 20 characters on each). You can build this LCD display. It also provides more debugging information, such as the minimum and maximum analog-to-digital samples that were measured during each period. [via]

Digital Sound Level Meter – [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Chris The Carpenter has put together possibly the most complete robot module for the Propeller Platform. Called the 444AVXB, he writes… [via]

Let’s start with the name, 444-AVXB stands for:
4 Amps (2 amps x 2 motors) via a L298 motor driver
4 ADC’s (Analog inputs) via a MCP3204 chip
4 Servos with connections to power and with current-limiting resistors on the signal wires
Audio-out (non-amplified)
Video-out via a standard RCA jack
Connections for an X-bee
Connections for a BlueSmirf Bluetooth unit

he 444-AVXB was designed with the robot hobbyist in mind. Connections are available for just about every “standard” thing you would find on a small to medium-sized robot. A hefty motor driver handles decent-sized motors with nice screw terminals for both power and motor connections. (4) 3-pin connections are provided for servos which can be powered by either external power or on-board power. An ADC chip allows for 4 analog inputs to be read, great for analog sensors, pots, LDR’s etc.

Video-out takes advantage of the awesome video capability of the prop and can be connected to any TV with a “video-in” and/or many of the cheapie 7” LCD screens (found on Ebay). Audio is just that, audio out with the circuit being the same as can be found on many other propeller products. Pin 15 has been brought forward as well for a Ping))) sonar unit. Finally, there is room and connections for EITHER an X-bee or Bluetooth module. All unused pins are accessible via female headers.

A Robot Module with Everything – [Link]

18 Oct 2011

ad7gd.net writes:

This little board demonstrates the capabilities of the MMA2260 +/- 1.5g X-Axis Micromachined Accelerometer. As you tip it back and forth, LEDs light up to show the magnitude and direction of the G force.

The MMA2260 is the fat SOIC 16 in the upper left, isolated so it could be cut off of the board and used as a breakout, keeping only a pin header and the recommended decoupling and output RC filter.

The microcontroller is a PIC16F628, which is entirely unsuited to this application, having no ADC. I failed to notice that, being quick to note “AN0″ on PORTA and slow to note that it was for a comparator, not an ADC. However, there is a builtin programmable voltage reference which was sufficiently accurate for lighting up 8 LEDs. I’m trying to get away from PICs, as AVRs have spoiled me with their GCC support, many registers and sane memory organization. Even on this project, which is only about 30 lines of C, most of the work was fighting SDCC bugs (failure to banksel, in this case). I’ve discovered a perverse pleasure in soldering down ICs to counteract my packrat nature. It did force me to put an ICSP header on, however.

MMA2260 Accelerometer Demo – [Link]

20 Jun 2011

ermicro.com writes:

The PIC16F690 microcontroller is one of Microchip midrange 8-bit microcontroller that has a build in 10-bit resolution of Analog to Digital Converter (ADC) peripheral. The ADC is one of the important features that enable us to digitize our analog world. Usually we use the electronic sensor to convert the analog value to the voltage level value. Some of the basic sensor such as LDR (Light Dependent Resistor) is used for measuring the light intensity or NTC (Negative Temperature Coefficient) a special resistor for measuring the temperature.

PIC Analog to Digital Converter C Programming – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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