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14 Mar 2011

Big Dripper from Giles Hall on Vimeo.

Giles Hall writes:

Big Dripper is a robotic sculpture created by Giles Hall in 2011. It is a concept based on Harold Edgerton’s Piddler. Edgerton’s Piddler, also known as a “Time Fountain”, uses a stroboscopic light source to highlight individual drops of water in a constant stream of liquid. With the strobe off, the stream looks like a solid cylinder of falling water. With the strobe on, and correctly synchronized with the actuation of the pump, the individual drips of water that compose the stream are exposed.

Water droplet sculpture using LEDs and Arduino – [Link]

13 Mar 2011

1324itouch writes:

Hello everybody!!!
I have been messing around with a few components and my arduino. I figured out this project last week and just had to share it with all of you. What it is, is a laser beam hitting a photo cell. The arduino reads the photo cell and when it detects the voltage level is below a certain amount, the beam must be broken while sounding an alarm. The alarm stays on until you punch in the code you have set up to the keypad in. Once the correct code is typed in, the arduino turns of the buzzer and gives you 15 seconds ( or what ever you set the delay time to) to reset the laser beam. You are able to change the code if you like. The steps are very easy to follow and i hope everyone makes one!!!

Arduino laser detector with keypad – [Link]

11 Mar 2011

This project (from Teague Labs) was intended to study the usage of water for various purposes and how this information could affect behaviors of persons using water when displayed on real time. The water meter sensor used in this project is INS-FM17N from Koolance. The sensor is directly interfaced to an Arduino that acquires and send data to a web server to make it available online. [via]

Arduino based water usage meter - [Link]

 

11 Mar 2011

MAKE is holding a drawing for a Getting Started with Arduino Kit. To be eligible for this drawing, all you have to do is tell them why you want to learn Arduino and maybe what projects you might like to do with it. Eligible entries will end at 11:59 PST, Tuesday March 15th, 2011. Good luck! [via]

Getting Started with Arduino Kit Giveaway – [Link]


11 Mar 2011

Using the Arduino development platform you will learn how to display numbers and letters on a single 7-segment LED display. There are many ways to drive 7-segment displays — this is a fairly simple method.

Arduino – Hooking up a 7-Segment LED Display – [Link]

10 Mar 2011

We’ve seen a number of tutorials explaining the use of LCD displays with Arduino. In most the display contrast is varied by use of a potentionmeter. Here’s a tutorial from Hobbytronics which varies the contrast using PWM. [via]

Arduino varies LCD contrast using PWM – [Link]

10 Mar 2011

Shield to control 6 relay, 6 digital input and 6 analog input with Arduino Duemilanove, Arduino UNO or Seeeduino. The digital inputs and relay outputs are equipped with an LED that indicates the status. The lines of I/O are connected to the Arduino through corresponding pin-strip pitch 2.54 mm. It gets its power directly from the Arduino module, which provides the 5 volt regulator derived from their contacts between the 5V and GND. The mini-relay Shield of work at 12 volts, so that the relays are working properly will have to connect the Arduino module with an external power supply can provide this voltage. The card can be used in many applications and in many ways. Find in this page a little sketch as to manage I/O via serial commands.

Input/Output Shield for Arduino – [Link]

 

9 Mar 2011

Computerless Arduino from adam kumpf on Vimeo.

So cool:

The Computerless Arduino consists of two major components; an Arduino-compatible microcontroller loaded with a realtime code interpreter, and a stand-alone 5-button LCD display to display port values and manipulate code. The display can be connected to the Arduino via a 4-pin port at any time to peek at In/Out values, view the current code, and make changes as desired.

Computerless Arduino – [Link]

9 Mar 2011

Riley Porter shows you how easy it is to replace a blown Atmel chip (the microcontroller heart of the Arduino) and to flash the Arduino software onto the new chip. For a few bucks and about 15 minutes of work, you can have your Arduino board back in business. [via]

Arduino – Replace and Re-Flash a Blown Microcontroller Chip – [Link]

6 Mar 2011

blog.lincomatic.com writes:

ITead Studio kindly sent me a Colorduino for beta testing. The Colorduino was inspired by SeeedStudio’s Rainbowduino LED Driver Platform. Its form factor is very similar to that of the Rainbowduino, and the layout of the connectors was intentionally designed to mimic the latter. Both boards are based on the ATmega368 MCU, and are Arduino compatible. The principal difference between the platforms is that while the Rainbowduino is based on 3 MBI5168 constant current sink drivers and a M54564 darlington source driver, the Colorduino pairs the M54564 with a single DM163 constant current driver.

Also released an Arduino library that works with both the Colorduino and Iteadʼs Arduino RGB Matrix driver shield.

Tead Studio Colorduino – A Preview – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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