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27 Oct 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

The Amicus18 board is physically compatible with Arduino shields. However, the default PIC processor on the board is a 3.3 V type, which could be an issue while interfacing some of the shields that strictly operate at +5V. As a support to the users of the Amicus18 development board, Gevo Electronics from The Netherlands has designed a special shield, named AmiPIC18 LCD. Although the name says it is a LCD shield, but in real it provides a lot more features, which we will be exploring in this article.

Introducing the AmiPIC18 LCD shield - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Interfacing Arduino to USB GPRS modem @ Circuits@Home. Oleg writes – [via]

Some time ago I started writing about connecting Arduino to cellular network. Using standard GSM AT commands, a program running on Arduino can place and take calls, send and receive SMS, shoot pictures, access the Internet while monitoring phone’s battery level, signal strength and connection status. For many of these tasks any old phone works quite well, however, there are times when a specialized piece of hardware is desired. Today I’m going to talk about one such piece of hardware which can be connected to Arduino board using USB Host Shield.

Interfacing Arduino to USB GPRS modem - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Arduino BiCMOS Curve Tracer – [via]

The curves above can be done with a Arduino board, a solderless breadboard, a dual Rail to Rail Input/Output Op amp, a few resistors and capacitors, and some free software. The graphs above are produced by either Scilab or Octave. The curves are also viewed when using the Processing application.

Arduino BiCMOS Curve Tracer - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

Mike is just controlling a CNC over the web with an iPad, no biggie – [via]

Controlling my cnc over the web with my ipad so I mocked up a powertail with an arduino to turn the spindle on/off. Took the original housing off and it fits easily into my adafruit arduino case. Matt Ratto made an on off button for me in processing that can leave on my desktop and click remotely.

Controlling a CNC over the web with an iPad - [Link]


23 Oct 2011

NueWire – 8 Foot LED Pixel bar powered by Arduino & MSGEQ7. willnue writes – [via]

First a little background… Last year I built a color organ type project using the hackable GE RGB LED Christmas lights and the MSGEQ7 Graphic Equalizer Display Filter. The project changed the lights based on the audio signal presented to the MSGEQ7. I wrote several effects for the lights and changed them based on pressing a button.

Upon seeing the GE lights in all their glory a friend of mine thought it would be cool to have something similar for his entertainment center. I happened to have another set of GE lights, so I said sure no problem. Fast forward 6 months of both of us forgetting about it and me thinking up another use for the extra set of GE lights I had, so now I needed to source a new set of lights. After looking around at several options I decided on the 20mm Clear Digital RGB LED Pixels from Bliptronics/Adafruit. The LED Pixels are very bright and with the available Arduino library they are easy to control. In addition to a button to change effects in my old design I also added an IR receiver and mapped a few unused buttons on the standard FIOS remote, so now you can switch effects without ever leaving the couch!

While working on the new hardware I also came up with a few new effects, some of which are based on the audio running through the EQ and some of which are not. The EQ effects are mainly driven by 3 channels from the MSGEQ7 (Low, Mid, High). Each of the channels corresponds to a Red, Green or Blue LED in a pixel and the value of the channel as determined by the MSGEQ7 sets the intensity of the colors. This basic mapping makes for a great visualization of the music and theoretically the same song will always produce the same effect.

NueWire – 8 Foot LED Pixel bar powered by Arduino & MSGEQ7 - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

RiderNet V2 – an All-Weather Arduino-Managed WiFi Network… Kris writes – [via]

RiderNet is an all-weather arduino-managed 802.11g WiFi network made from 6 exterior and 3 interior Netgear WNDR3300 WiFi routers and Arduino Mega 2560s in a mineral oil tank. The mineral oil provides temperature stabilizaiton in freezing cold and very hot conditions, an aquarium pump and heater provide circulation and heating in the winter. These will be installed around Misty Brae Farm on trees, barns and other spots to provide complete WiFi coverage of our Pony Club Center in Virginia. The electronics were inspired by Adafruit Industires, which provided all the tutorials and great parts I got the project.

After completion I took these screenshots, and dressed one of them up with a breakdown of the RiderNet components. This unit is the “Showcase Model”, as I mounted a VFD LCD and one of the new Adafruit temp/humidity sensors outside the router for exterior measurements. This one will go in the main barn, so it wont be directly exposed to rain/snow – so I figured it would be nice to have the temp/humidity of the barn displayed on the VFD. The VFD LCD working with the “showcase” router looks very nice – especially at night.

RiderNet V2 – an All-Weather Arduino-Managed WiFi Network - [Link]

23 Oct 2011

 

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects @ MAKE. Matt writes… [via]

Ever since I started making projects with the Arduino, I’ve had a desire to shrink them down to a single, small circuit board. One of my first projects, a customizable SLR intervalometer, was packed in a phonebook-sized cardboard box and used the Arduino Deumilanove connected to a breadboard with jumper wires. I brought the box out to Central Park at 5am to make a timelapse of the sunrise, but when I got to the park, I spent 20 minutes fixing the connections between the Arduino, the breadboard, and the components. Since then, I’ve explored a few different ways of shrinking projects down and making them more robust. For the intervalometer, I designed a circuit board that had female header pins to seat an Arduino Nano. It was a huge improvement on the design, but I knew I could do a lot better.

I tried to teach myself AVR programming, but ran into a lot of snags along the way. By the time I got an LED to blink, I had invested hours in the project (a stark contrast to my first Arduino experience) and was feeling quite discouraged. I also tried using PICAXE chips. While it was much easier to get started with these chips than with AVR programming, I felt like I was abandoning all my years of C programming to learn a form of BASIC that’s an entirely different animal from when I used it as a kid.

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects - [Link]

18 Oct 2011

sustburbia.blogspot.com writes:

Back in July I was contacted by Nikki of fizzPop Hackspace in Birmingham about making very low cost Arduino clones on stripboard. I hadn’t really given it much thought until I realised how easy it would be to make an Arduino compatible device on stripboard (or breadboard) for something less than a fiver!

I’ve tried to standardise the design, to make use of the ATmega328 pin-out – which lends itself for an efficient layout.
Here’s a couple of recent boards – one is a controller for a spark ignition system, and the other is a general purpose layout – just the Arduino in the corner of a vast expanse of prototyping board.

Below is the prototype spark ignition controller. It is based on the Atmel ATmega328 microcontroller and uses the standard FTDI USB to serial cable as a means of

Arduinoids – The Rise of the Machines - [Link]

18 Oct 2011

The MHVBoard is an Arduino clone kit, which does away with a second chip for USB comms, and instead uses V-USB to talk directly to the main microcontroller.

The kit has been designed to run soldering workshops, and is completely hand-solderable, even by complete newbies (all through hole components except for 1 large pin soltage regulator).

Programming is done via the USBAspLoader bootloader, which presents itself to the computer as a USB ASP programmer, which AVRDude knows how to talk to. Patches for the Arduino environment to teach it about this board are also included.

Since the chip directly has USB support, projects can easily emulate low-speed USB devices using the V-USB library. I have integrated USB Keyboard support into our MHVLib runtime library, and others have written similar libraries for the Arduino environment.

The MHVBoard also has a prototying area available, and our members have successfully used this for various interfaces (displays, nunchucks, etc). I have also built a software controllered 3V->5V boost regulator (using the MHVlib driver) in the proto-area so I can run off LiPos, but that is another project ;)

Other unique features include a 20MHz clock (instead of 16MHz on other Arduino boards), as well as breadboard compatibility. A right angle connector can be mounted along the edge, allowing the whole board to be installed (standing vertically) into a breadboard, with all pins broken out.

MHVBoard – an Arduino Clone - [Link]

6 Oct 2011

adafruit.com writes:

There are any number of projects for which it would be handy to animate LEDs from a PC. Not a microcontroller, but a full-on PC. Media — music and video — are a natural for PCs, and tools like Max/MSP and Processing are a natural for creating media-based software sketches. (We use “PC” here in the generic “personal computer” sense, not in opposition to Mac; Using a combination of Processing and Arduino, everything shown here runs as well on Mac or Linux as it does on a Windows system!)

As a first demonstration, we’ll build a simple “Ambilight ” clone. Ambilight is a feature of some Philips televisions that projects colored light onto the wall behind the display , synchronized with the content on the screen to create an immersive effect. The authentic Philips system is well-integrated into the TV and works from any video source. Our facsimile, being computer-driven, works specifically with media content from your PC. This means its perfect for watching Youtube, TV or Movies on your PC or playing games!

Adalight – Make your own DIY Arduino-powered ambient “Ambilight”-like lighting rig - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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