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27 Dec 2011

howiem.com writes:

Picked up one of these IC test clips on eBay for a few quid.

The idea is that you clip it to a chip on a circuit board so you have easy access to the connections for use with test probes.

I’ve got a different use for it though. If you develop a circuit using an Atmega chip (like, say, a circuit you developed with an Arduino but have now moved to a custom board), reprogramming the chip is fiddly. The best way to make your circuit easily re-programmable is to build an ISP header onto your board – it’s just a 6-pin connector that lets you blast new programming onto the chip without removing it from the circuit.

DIY Atmega programming clip - [Link]

26 Dec 2011

The Audrey Braille Display – LIVE! @ Utopia Mechanicus. David writes – [via]

It’s taken far longer than I wanted, but I am finally looking at a finished prototype for the Audrey Braille Display. Made of 3mm Acrylic laser-cut pieces (via the Victoria Makerspace laser cutter), it uses two stepper motors, connects to an Arduino (and LadyAda Motor Driver board), and displays 5 characters.

The Audrey Braille Display - [Link]

 

20 Dec 2011

 

It’s been a busy year for element14 and the online social community for engineers is ending 2011 on a high note with the launch of element14 TV, the industry’s first online television channel designed for electronics engineers and tech enthusiasts.

The new dedicated channel offers instant access to an expansive range of information-rich content in one, easy-to-search destination.  Anchored by The Ben Heck Show, a leading online TV tech series, this “YouTube for engineers” offers a programming line-up spanning electronics how-tos, Arduino tutorials, user-generated videos, informational videos from leading electronics component and subsystem providers, and the latest in technology and product overviews.

If your schedule permits, we’d love to get you on the phone with Diane Kibbey – global head of the community – to talk about the new channel, the growth of the community over the past year and exciting plans for video down the road.

element14 launches “YouTube for engineers” - [Link]

12 Dec 2011

Getting Started- Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino | A work in progress….  [via]

This is a quick tutorial on getting a VFD working with an Arduino (or Arduino equivalent system). VFDs are beautiful devices with a wonderful hexagonal mesh of wires and this lovely green/blue glow. Operating at around 5V, they offer a nice alternative to high voltage Nixie tubes, while still retaining a lot of the charm.

This tutorial will show you how to connect a Arduino-like device to a VFD display as well as a basic program to display text.

Vacuum Fluorescent Display & Teensyduino - [Link]


3 Dec 2011

Please welcome ArduPilotMega 2.0! – DIY Drones. Jordi writes – [via]

APM 2.0 is the culmination of almost a year of hard work. We wanted to make it perfect and we finally have it, we are pushing the limits of AVR and Arduino. I’m sure you will love it, and it’s designed to cover all the DIY community expectations (including those that are not so DIY and are only interested for something that doesn’t require soldering skills).

ArduPilotMega 2.0! - [Link]

3 Dec 2011

Arduino 1.0 now available.. David writes –  [via]

Arduino 1.0 is now available from the download page

A long time coming, this release brings small but important changes to clean up the Arduino environment and language – as well as adding lots of additional features. Updates to the environment include a new file extension, toolbar icons, and color scheme as well as a progress bar on compilation and upload. The language changes include modifications to the Serial class, addition of DHCP and DNS support to the Ethernet library, a new SoftwareSerial library, multi-file support in the SD library, modifications to the Wire library and UDP class, etc. For details, please see the release notes or this blog post. We’ll be pushing the updated reference for Arduino 1.0 live in the next day or two.

This release is the product of many people (listed in the release notes). Thank you to everyone who helped us get here!

Arduino 1.0 now available - [Link]

3 Dec 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Luca made an Amp-meter using the ACS712 current sensor, and the Arduino.

The ACS712 is a fully integrated, hall effect based, linear current sensor. It converts the current that passes through its input pins to a proportional voltage on an output pin. He connected the output pin to an analog pin of his Arduino, and made a simple logging software that reads 1000 samples.

Current sensing with the Arduino - [Link]

1 Dec 2011

How to connect a weather station WS2355 (or WS2300) to Weather Underground with Arduino:

There are several softwares that enable the publication of the weather data of a professional weather station, but they all work on PC, so we should connect the weather station to a computer and leave it on, the idea is not good because the computer takes up space and consumes a lot. At a time when we should spare the energy, its not a good thing.

The project we’re talking about instead operates as a stand-alone application and allows you to publish the weather station data independently on http://www.wunderground.com, “forgetting” the PC consumption and even the desk space.
Arduino controls the dialogue with the weather station to acquire the data and also the Ethernet interface to transfer them, by making the necessary connection to the Internet via ADSL, passing by a router pointing to the IP address of the Weather Underground site and transferring information using the TCP / IP.

Connect WS2355 (or WS2300) to Weather Underground using Arduino - [Link

28 Nov 2011

Make a Laser Ball via Arduino blog (and appeared on our weekly show and tell!)… [via]

It’s a “programmable disco ball,” a “cat toy for humans,” and a “personal laser light show,” all rolled into one. That’s how one Matt Leone describes his latest creation, aptly known as the Laser Ball. To realize his dream, Leone drilled a set of holes into a garden variety tennis ball, and inserted about 14 laser diodes, each with an attached strip of diffraction grating. Said diodes were then synced up with an Arduino-equipped Teensy microcontroller nestled within the ball, alongside a rechargeable battery – http://leonelabs.blogspot.com

Make a laser ball… -[Link]

24 Nov 2011

Calunium: An ATMega1284 Arduino Clone – [via]

Whoa! Steve Marple has created Calunium, an Arduino clone built around the ATMega644/1284 chip. In addition to the larger memory and I/O that the ’1284 provides, he’s also integrated a DS1307 real-time clock and coin cell on-board, and broken out the footprint for an LM61 temp sensor. This is a really interesting project, and a nice looking one, too!

You can check out more details at his blog, including posts about building your own Calunium with strip board and the differences between the Calunium and Arduino.

Calunium is Open Source Hardware, and you can get the board and schematic files over on GitHub.

Calunium: An ATMega1284 Arduino Clone - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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