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3 Feb 2012

If your Arduino project has minimal IO needs, you may want to consider shrinkifying it. This video demonstrates High Low Tech’s method for programming an ATTiny with Arduino code. Maker Randy Sarafan has designed an 8-pin Arduino programming shield to make the task easier. [via]

Shrinkify your Arduino project - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

Don built an Amblight for his home theater PC. He put together this tutorial describing his build of a multichannel Arduino-based Ambilight. He estimates the BOM at $40 (in addition to the Arduino). [via]

The bill of materials include 6+ ShiftBrites (your call, I wouldn’t do less than 6 though), a printed circuit board, wire, and headers. Additionally this will require all of the components needed to get over 0.5 Amps at 5.5-9V DC on to the board to drive the ShiftBrites; this cannot be reasonably done over USB power. My ultimate goal here is to give others some ideas on how to go about this project for less money than it would cost to essentially buy everything in a kit. I went in to this trying to be resourceful and I feel pretty good about how it turned out.

DIY Arduino Ambilight using ShiftBrites - [Link]

2 Feb 2012

kalshagar.wikispaces.com writes:

Goal is to replace this Ikea super cheap timer that works … well, as good as something manual that you paied less than 200 JPY (less than 2 euro). Not precise, sometimes doesn’t ring, or ring just the blink of an eye, so easy to miss…

The new timer will:

  • Have a graphical LCD (bought one one year ago, never used it, needed a pretext, so…)
  • Work on battery (1x 9v battery)
  • Play music when it’s time
  • Use a speaker and amp
  • Possibly use a YMZ294 ?
  • In fact something else but much better…
  • Have an on/off system with a push-button, not a open/close switch In fact a tilt switch
  • No arduino, but a simple atmega 328 (more than sufficient)
  • Keep me busy a few days while allowing me to use some parts I bought long time ago and create a un-reasonable and out of price kitchen timer

Arduino KitchenTimer - [Link]

1 Feb 2012

Jaanus has been working on a subminiature Arduino clone which be believes is THE smallest – [via]

Everybody are making Arduino clones. So I thought I should make THE smallest. I took smallest package atmega88 – qnf28 (5mm x 5mm). Routed smallest possible resonator and as much pads as i could fit on in.

His design provides SPI, UART, one LED and breaks out 4 analog and 1 digital IO pins.

tinyDino – smallest Arduino board - [Link]


1 Feb 2012

ibuildthings.ryanblace.com writes:

Remembering to take a vitamin daily is simple enough. Remember to take a vitamin every three days is nearly impossible (for me). I wanted a solution which will remind me to take the pill and require zero effort. This small project holds two bottles in a fairly nice looking box and flashes red until you take the pill. The act of picking up the bottle (the pill ingestion is assumed) is the entire interface.

Arduino vitamin – pill reminder - [Link]

30 Jan 2012

Andrea Belloni writes:

We realized this project for the “Arduino Day” in Rome 14/04/2011. For it we used two JeeNode (Arduino variant with wireless module on-board), one Rainbowduino + RGB LED Matrix and one PC with Processing. The Processing sketch generate the “plasma” animation and sends the images stream to the first JeeNode via serial port. This JeeNode receives the images and sends it to the second JeeNode via wireless link. The second JeeNode receives the images and sends it to the Rainbowduino + RGB LED Matrix via i2c. More details on the blog’s post (for the English version scroll down).

Wireless pixels - [Link]

29 Jan 2012

Moser from ReiBot has developed a simple project for using an Arduino along with an LM399 and several discrete components to measure inductance. He says: [via]

So you need to make or measure an inductor, but you don’t have an oscilloscope or signal generator? Measuring inductance with a handful of cheap common parts is certainly possible. I’ve verified this method is accurate with a scope from 80uH to 30,000uH, but it should work for inductors a bit smaller or much larger.

Easily measure inductance using Arduino - [Link]

22 Jan 2012

Arduino factory tour - [Link]

21 Jan 2012

Use an Arduino with with USB HID support to control a project in Git… [via]

The project provides a device that allows for a user configurable Git hub repository to be interacted with via a series buttons, switch, and many other I/O electronics. This is very similar to the alias process in Unix.

You’ll be able to press buttons:
1. Clone reposity
2. Goto Project
3. Get Changes
4. Find New
5. Merge New
6. Show Branches
7. Diff
8. Commit
9. Push

In the future yes/no, and enter buttons could be added. Lot’s of fun options.

Use an Arduino with with USB HID support to control a project in Git - [Link]

21 Jan 2012

Solar PV Monitoring System / OpenEnergyMonitor. Glyn writes – [via]

Here is the documentation for a solar PV monitoring system that’s been developed as part of the OpenEnergyMonitor project. It’s based on Arduino and is fully open-source; hardware, firmware and web application.

The system monitors both generation and consumption and gives the user a clear indication of when their household electricity demands are being met by their solar PV array (green light) or when their not (red light). The wireless display also shows how much electricity is currently being exported or imported. Monitoring data is also posted on-line by a wireless web-connected base-station to our powerful open-source web-application emoncms.

This development is part of the actively on-going OpenEnergyMonitor project to design and build open-source tools for the monitoring, visualization and control of energy.

Open-source solar PV monitoring system - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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