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28 Aug 2011

Hiduino: A firmware for building driverless usb-midi devices using the arduino microcontroller from Alexander Refsum Jensenius on Vimeo.

HIDuino is a firmware package that allows you to easily implement MIDI over USB using a standard Arduino UNO. It has been out for several months, but this talk from NIME2011 elaborates on its history and how it works. Sadly, the audio cuts out around 7’20″, so after that you’ll just have to watch the slides. [via]

This paper presents a series of open-source firmwares for the latest iteration of the popular Arduino microcontroller platform. A portmanteau of Human Interface Device and Arduino, the HIDUINO project tackles a major problem in designing NIMEs: easily and reliably communicating with a host computer using standard MIDI over USB. HIDUINO was developed in conjunction with a class at the California Institute of the Arts intended to teach introductory-level human-computer and human-robot interaction within the context of musical controllers. We describe our frustration with existing microcontroller platforms and our experiences using the new firmware to facilitate the development and prototyping of new music controllers.

The talk is given by Dimitri Diakopoulos, and you can download the PDF of the white paper from his website.

Hiduino: An Open-Source Firmware for Arduino MIDI Devices - [Link]

26 Aug 2011

This is just a quick video showing that you can power an AVR project from a fried servo or an old emergency cell phone charger.

Arduino Project Alternative Power Sources - [Link]

26 Aug 2011

RiderScan – Manage horses with Adafruit gear! RFID barn management system made for Misty Brae Farm of Virginia…

This is a demo of the RiderScan system; an RFID barn management system made for Misty Brae Farm of Virginia. The system is comprised mostly (~85%) of electronic goodies from Adafruit Industries (http://www.adafruit.com/) and cobbled together using an Arduino Mega Protoshield and lots of Acrylic.

RiderScan – Manage horses with Adafruit gear! RFID barn management system - [Link]

26 Aug 2011

adafruit.com writes:

Micro SD card Tutorial How to add lots o’ storage with microSD (and SD) cards. If you have a project with any audio, video, graphics, data logging, etc in it, you’ll find that having a removable storage option is essential. Most microcontrollers have extremely limited built-in storage. For example, even the Arduino Mega chip (the Atmega2560) has a mere 4Kbytes of EEPROM storage. There’s more flash (256K) but you cant write to it as easily and you have to be careful if you want to store information in flash that you don’t overwrite the program itself!

Micro SD card – Using SD cards with an Arduino! - [Link]


24 Aug 2011

jethomson.wordpress.com writes:

Here’s an article I wrote about reusing a cheap ($6) USBasp programmer for another project by flashing new code on to it. It’s a decent alternative to a more expensive USB dev board if you have a simple project that doesn’t require any pins or you can make do with the four SPI pins. The article discusses how to download new code using an external programmer or USBaspLoader. It also explains how to make it work with the Arduino IDE. At the end are a couple of evil demo programs showing how to use it as a USB HID keyboard.

Reflashing a betemcu USBasp Programmer - [Link]

22 Aug 2011

This is a simple power meter to analyze (with LabVIEW) the current consuming in a house using the led indicator of a house energy meter. Reading the red led of a home energy counters the system detects the correct consumption in a house. It is a noninvasive method, not cut wire, no current disconnects, so a very interesting method…

The system consists of two parts: the Arduino board that detects the led pulses and sends the data via the XBee module, and a PC that receive the data through a USB/Xbee module and processes the data with LabVIEW so you can prepare and study the consumption in a very instant. Arduino sends two data to the PC: 1 – Real time datas 2 – Average consumption measured in a time of 5 minutes.

Real-Time Energy Monitor with Arduino and LabVIEW - [Link]

13 Aug 2011

Let’s say that you’re trying to drive a few Nixie clock tubes, or you want to make a strobe light. A variable high voltage DC power supply from 50-200+ volts may be required. Transformers are terrific, but difficult to find the right one and a pain to wind. Why not use a boost converter? They’re easy and don’t necessarily require a guru for basic operation. This guide is meant for the individual who wants to build a simple boost converter, and may need refreshing on the theory. It will also help determine what parts will be required.

Boost Converter Intro with Arduino - [Link]

12 Aug 2011

daisyworks.com writes:

We’ve built an Arduino derivative with Bluetooth, IrDA, SD Card, servo ports, and RJ telco jacks for plugging in various sensors / controls.  With our boards, you can also do FOTA over Bluetooth on your Android phone or desktop (Mac/Linux/Win).  We have an App Store repository that lets you download the firmware and FOTA it onto the device, and then interact with it via a user interface.

DaisyWorks: Internet your thing - [Link]

12 Aug 2011

Nexus Automation Limited is manufacture and marketing robot kits and relevant accessories.This robot kit is a 3 omni wheels drive mobile robot kit, supports programmable in C, C++ and especially developed for hobby, professional and educational use. Includes microcontroller, Ultrasonic Range Finder and motors.

Features:

● 3 wheel drive
● Omni wheel
● Aluminum alloy fram
● Capable of rotation and side way
● Includes Ultrasonic sensors
● With Arduino microcontroller and IO expansion board
● Programmable with C, C++

3WD 48mm Omni wheel mobile robot kit - [Link]

26 Jul 2011

This book will show you how to use your Arduino to control a variety of different robots, while providing step-by-step instructions on the entire robot building process. You’ll learn Arduino basics as well as the characteristics of different types of motors used in robotics. You also discover controller methods and failsafe methods, and learn how to apply them to your project. The book starts with basic robots and moves into more complex projects, including a GPS-enabled robot, a robotic lawn mower, a fighting bot, and even a DIY Segway-clone.

  • Introduction to the Arduino and other components needed for robotics
  • Learn how to build motor controllers
  • Build bots from simple line-following and bump-sensor bots to more complex robots that can mow your lawn, do battle, or even take you for a ride

Book: Arduino Robotics - [Link]

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