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26 Jan 2015

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by paulbleisch.com:

My son got one of these Leap Frog toys a few years ago as a gift. He enjoys playing with it very much. I am not sure how much counting and learning he is doing but it makes funny noises and sings to him so its a lot of fun.

Recently the unthinkable happened. It died. Not the batteries but something else. I took the back off to look at what might be wrong (which was very easy for a toy). Unfortunately, other than the speaker, a switch, battery compartment, and a ribbon cable to the front, there wasn’t much to investigate. A couple of glop tops and nothing else. I fiddled a bit more with it but everything “external” seemed fine.

Make a Custom Membrane Keypad for Arduino – [Link]

22 Jan 2015

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by PeterHaban @ makechronicles.com:

I made a water level sensor a little while a go to measure the water level in my underground rainwater harvesting tank. Thanks to the Jubilee I found time to finally setup the first part of my Arduino/Xbee wireless sensor network and the first sensor node was also meant to read from this water level sensor. I was somewhat surprised when it only returned 0s so I went and had a closer look. How the slug got into the enclosure is still a mystery to me… but looking at the bright side (after the uncontrolled swearing) I now had a reason to build a much better water level sensor

Measuring a water tank level – [Link]

21 Jan 2015

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial #2 – Load Graphics on the display

In this tutorial we are going to learn how to load our custom made graphics into a Nokia 5110 lcd display.

Arduino Nokia 5110 LCD display tutorial – [Link]

13 Jan 2015

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StickyBUGs are small, modular boards that enable you to quickly make your own Arduino shield, with no wiring or soldering required!

StickyBUGs are small, modular boards that enable you to very quickly make your own shield, with no wiring or soldering required! Take a handful of stickyBUGs, plug them into the main stickySHIELD and you are ready to go! Full sample and library code is provided. StickyBUGs can be placed in any order, making them the ultimate configurable solution for Arduino development. Now you can create the shield you want that will fit perfectly into your next project. Fast, configurable and low cost make stickyBUGs an ideal addition to any makers toolbox.

StickyBUG – Make Your Own Shields for Arduino – [Link]


8 Jan 2015

pressure-sensor

praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

This article is about interfacing pressure sensor to arduino. The pressure sensor used here is SPD005G from Smartec . SPD (Smart Pressure Device) is a series of silicon based pressure sensors suitable for industrial as well as house hold applications. These sensors are generally available in plastic inline or dual inline packaging. SPD sensors are generally available in two operation modes namely gauge type and absolute type. In gauge type the pressure is measured with respect to the atmospheric pressure. There is a small vent on the package for getting contact with the atmosphere. In absolute type, the pressure is measured with respect to vacuum. A small vacuum chamber is incorporated into the package during fabrication. Typical applications of SPD005G are medical systems, BP monitoring, air conditioning systems, process control, hand held pressure sensors etc.

Interfacing pressure sensor to arduino – [Link]

8 Jan 2015

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by Jason Poel Smith @ makezine.com:

When working in extreme temperatures it is important to monitor your body temperature. In freezing weather, your fingers and toes get numb and you can develop frostbite without even noticing it. Likewise, if your core body temperature drops too low, you can start to start to suffer the effects of hypothermia before you are aware of it.

So I designed an automatic temperature sensor that will monitor the temperature of your fingers, your toes, and your torso, as well as the outside temperature. This can help you to stay safe when working in extreme cold.

Wearable Temperature Sensors For Working in Extreme Cold – [Link]

6 Jan 2015

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by siemenwauters @ instructables.com:

this is my first instructable. i show you updates on my cnc machine which will cost about 200 euro’s for still decent quality.
don’t hate if you don’t like this instructable, I’m just an 18 years old student from belguim sharing his ideas and creations with other people. because i think working together and sharing idea’s will make better projects.

this is what the machine looks like right now. ill post new photos every time i advance building

i know my video’s are not the best. i’m working hard to show you how everything works so it would be nice if you watched at least a peace of all of them to support my project.

Cheap Arduino CNC – [Link]

2 Jan 2015

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by DIY Hacks and How Tos @ instructables.com:

The Clapper was a popular gadget in the 80’s and 90’s. It let you turn appliances on and off just by clapping. This can be pretty useful, but it has some limitations. First there is the problem of loud noises accidentally turning the lights off. Also, you can’t control multiple outlets independently of each other.

So I decided to make programmable version of the Clapper using an Arduino microcontroller. The Arduino lets you set codes for each outlet. This eliminates false triggering and lets you control multiple outlets independently. Your lamp could be turned on and off with one clapping pattern and your fan could be controlled with another pattern.

Sound Activated Outlet – [Link]

30 Dec 2014

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by lfaessler @ soldernerd.com:

My aim is to build an ultrasonic anemometer based on a Arduino Uno board. Now what’s an anemometer? That’s just a fancy name for a wind meter. I want to be able to measure both wind speed and wind direction with high accuracy. Most wind meters are of the cup or vane variety. They turn wind into mechanical motion and then measure that motion to calculate wind speed and possibly direction. An ultrasonic anemometer on the other hand sends and receives ultrasonic pulses and measures the time-of-flight. From the time-of-flight (or the time difference, depending on your approach) you can then calculate the wind speed in a given direction. Add a second pair of senders and receivers at a 90-degree angle and you get both wind speed and direction.

Arduino Ultrasonic Anemometer – [Link]

26 Dec 2014

hc-05-breadboard-600x339

Phillipe Cantin writes:

So you want to two HC-05 modules to automatically connect together, as soon as they’re powered up and with zero code? Well this is your lucky day since this can be done using the AT+BIND command.
Let’s do this thing!
For this, you will need:
1 Arduino (I’m using UNO)
2 HC-05 modules
1 breadboard
Wires
Arduino IDE (I’m using version 1.0.5-r2)

[via]

HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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