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10 Oct 2013

HomeAutomation

Web-based relay controller for home automation.

Home automation is getting increasingly popular these days mainly due to reduced cost and simplicity through web or smartphone connectivity. Here’s a DIY version of web-based home automation controller that allows you to have a set of six relays connected to the end of a piece of Ethernet cable that can be accessed from a web browser anywhere from your house. You can use it to control or program the operation of lights, water pumps, or any other electrical appliances at home. The project uses Arduino (Atmega328) microcontroller and the ENC28J60 ethernet controller chipset.

[via]

Web-based relay controller for home automation - [Link]

6 Aug 2013

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Learn how to load Arduino bootloader on a ATMEGA328 IC using ISP programmer and Arduino board. randofo @ instructables.com writes:

Bootloading an Arduino with a ZIF socket allows you to easily program a lot of chips at once without worrying about mangling the pins. The reason for this is that ZIF stands for “zero insertion force,” and as the name implies, ZIF sockets don’t require any force to take the chip in or out. This means that you do not have to worry about any of the pins bending when you take the chip in and out of the socket. This is particularly useful if you need to bootload a lot of Arduino chips at once for inclusion in an electronics kit or if you need to repeatedly program a chip and transfer it back and forth between a separate circuit board.

Bootload an Arduino with a ZIF Socket - [Link]

26 Jul 2013

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JeonLab @ instructables.com writes:

For relatively small (less number of pins than ATmega328) projects, ATtiny series, ATtiny45 or Attiny85 are good choice in terms of its physical size (8-DIP or 8-SOIC) and low power consumption. There are many ways to program it. One of the popular device is USBtinyISP and DASA. Both of them work very well with WinAVR (AVRdude).

ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP - [Link]

19 Feb 2013

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Lira – A Barebones, Low-Cost, Arduino Compatible Atmega328 Breakout Board – [via]

What I came up with is the Lira. It is, as you will see, little more than a breakout board for the ATmega328, but it provides all the bare necessities like voltage regulation, basic power conditioning and an FTDI programming interface. It’s the smallest, simplest, cheapest design I could come up with that still uses through-hole components for ease of construction.

Certainly, your Boarduino has more features, better power conditioning and all of that. But then the Lira is significantly smaller at 2.15×0.85″ (vs. 3.0×0.8″, per the Boarduino page). So perhaps it will find an audience among those in search of the smallest, most bare-bones microcontroller they can build themselves.

Lira: A Barebones, Low-Cost, Arduino Compatible Atmega328 Breakout Board - [Link]


19 Dec 2012

NU-Xtal

This project is “NanoUtils Xtal” – a crystal oscillator breakout board. The board is designed to be interfaced with microcontrollers that have their oscillator pins next to a ground pin. [via]

This board is a breakout containing a SMD crystal, two caps and a resistor meant to be used in breadboards when building something with an Atmel ATmega or a Microchip PIC that have the two crystal pins next to a GND pin. For instance the atmega328 or pic18f2550.

Crystal oscillator breakout - [Link]

28 May 2012

jackzylkin writes:

Hey, we all LOVE the Arduino, and for my projects I make extra sure that I used the Arduino platform, so that everyone in the artist and hacker community could springboard off it for their own projects, and so that I can springboard off them. Its so universal and easy to learn! But, there are a few things THEY don’t want you to know about the Arduino…

A $3 Arduino - [Link]

18 Mar 2012

open-electronics.org writes:

We use an Arduino to program other ATmega without bootloader . This technique allows you to use all flash memory for code and make boards using new ATmega, cheaper than those with bootloader.

The qualities that have made the success of Arduino are undoubtedly the open-source software, many libraries, a good hardware and a virtually infinite Reference that explains each possible use of the platform.

But if we use Arduino for a specific use, we can integrate it into a specific circuit and program the micro in a way that performs a single firmware. We may so remove the bootloader and leave to the firmware the entire program memory.

The ATmega328 has 32 Kbytes of flash, that when the chip is mounted on Arduino are not all available, as a portion is reserved to the bootloader, the purpose of which is to communicate with the IDE Arduino to load programs (sketch) to be performed. The same bootloader, on each power on or reset of Arduino, verifies the presence of a sketch in flash memory and executes it. The bootloader occupies a space of 512 bytes, in the case of Arduino UNO.

Arduino ISP and stand-alone circuits - [Link]

12 Mar 2012

electronicsblog.net writes:

This is a very basic Atmega328 development kit It includes:

  • Atmega 328 8 bit microcontroller with 20 MHz crystal resonator
  • PCB board with place for external components
  • Power circuit that allows powering Atmega directly(2.7-5.5 V), or through a L7805 voltage regulator(8-35 V). L7805 circuit includes a thermal fuse.
  • 10 pin ISP connection for programming.

Atmega328 Development Kit Guide - [Link]

2 Feb 2012

kalshagar.wikispaces.com writes:

Goal is to replace this Ikea super cheap timer that works … well, as good as something manual that you paied less than 200 JPY (less than 2 euro). Not precise, sometimes doesn’t ring, or ring just the blink of an eye, so easy to miss…

The new timer will:

  • Have a graphical LCD (bought one one year ago, never used it, needed a pretext, so…)
  • Work on battery (1x 9v battery)
  • Play music when it’s time
  • Use a speaker and amp
  • Possibly use a YMZ294 ?
  • In fact something else but much better…
  • Have an on/off system with a push-button, not a open/close switch In fact a tilt switch
  • No arduino, but a simple atmega 328 (more than sufficient)
  • Keep me busy a few days while allowing me to use some parts I bought long time ago and create a un-reasonable and out of price kitchen timer

Arduino KitchenTimer - [Link]

18 Oct 2011

sustburbia.blogspot.com writes:

Back in July I was contacted by Nikki of fizzPop Hackspace in Birmingham about making very low cost Arduino clones on stripboard. I hadn’t really given it much thought until I realised how easy it would be to make an Arduino compatible device on stripboard (or breadboard) for something less than a fiver!

I’ve tried to standardise the design, to make use of the ATmega328 pin-out – which lends itself for an efficient layout.
Here’s a couple of recent boards – one is a controller for a spark ignition system, and the other is a general purpose layout – just the Arduino in the corner of a vast expanse of prototyping board.

Below is the prototype spark ignition controller. It is based on the Atmel ATmega328 microcontroller and uses the standard FTDI USB to serial cable as a means of

Arduinoids – The Rise of the Machines - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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