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15 Apr 2014

datalog328p

karllunt @ www.seanet.com writes:

This is pretty much one of those required projects; everyone builds a datalogger in an Altoids can. But each is different and I enjoyed making mine.

Features:
Uses ATmega328P (low power, 32K flash for lots of program space)
Uses Maxim/Dallas DS1337 Real Time Clock (uses I2C)
Logs data to microSD flash card, readable on PC (uses FAT32)
Runs on two AAA alkaline batteries
Low power draw (exact consumption varies based on SD card used)
Supports RS-232 for entering commands
Uses CR2032 lithium coin cell for RTC backup
Uses Analog Devices TMP36 for temperature sensor (not shown, it gets wired to the green four-position terminal shown below)
Uses SparkFun 3.3VDC boost converter to provide stable voltage even as batteries die

Datalogger in an Altoids can - [Link]

3 Apr 2014

thing1_front_small

White Systems ApS has launched a new and unique product – Miniature Wi-Fi Module – they are very excited by its ability to bring connectivity to devices not originally intended to support wireless functionality. Less than 1 day is needed to bring wireless functionality for engineer without any experience in Wi-Fi technology.

White Systems ApS is proud to offer a Wi-Fi module as complete platform solution to support wireless functionality with TCP server/client and UDP server/client at very competent prices. Module is based on TI CC3000 Wi-Fi chip and Atmega328p –with physical dimension of 30mmx18mm. The Wi-Fi Module is programmed and controlled with a simple ASCII command language – 3 instructions are need to start TCP/UDP server/client.  Please see attached datasheet & API documentation and sample app iPhone guide.

Key Feature and Benefits

  • SmartConfig™ technology enables simple Wi-Fi configuration using a smartphone, tablet or PC
  • Complete platform solution for WIFI, with TCP server, UDP server and SmartConfig™
  • Less than 1 day is needed to bring wireless functionally into your project
  • Low cost

No competing product comes close in terms of features, ease of use and price.

Availability and Evaluation Board
Miniature Wi-Fi Module is available for production for under 40$ per unit.  Knowing of your interest in innovative electronics products, we leave you open the opportunity to explore incredible new Wi-Fi product that we are sure your readers would like.

About White Systems ApS
Established in 2014, based on more than 20 years of development experience within wireless communication as ZigBee, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, company has been launched this January. In first 2 months company launched three products all based on the Miniature Wi-Fi Module. White Systems Aps is privately owned by three electronics engineer, with offices in Holte, Denmark. For further information, please visit our Web site at www.white-systems.com

Internet of Things – White Systems ApS has released an incredible new Wi-Fi product - [Link]

17 Mar 2014

unex-500x500

An incredibly small board at your fingertip: raising funds on Indiegogo!

A 100% Arduino IDE compatible, 32KB USB development board small enough to fit on your fingertips and cheap enough to leave in any project.

Having used several development boards over the years we soon realized that most of them are designed to be used for a single purpose. Having hacked some to increase functionality, we reasoned that not all boards would easily allow this and soon realized the need for boards which are feature rich, cost effective, yet easy to use and deploy in numerous applications. We set out to design such boards and this is where it has led us, our first pit-stop: The µ-nex.

The u-nex is a very compact Arduino compatible board designed around the Atmega328p micro-controller. It features 32KB of flash memory with ALL the micro-controller pins being brought out to enable you to build just about anything you would want to build with an 8-bit micro-controller from autonomous flying vehicles to LED cubes. Designed from the ground up to give you maximum possible versatility.

U-nex – a Arduino compatible, 32KB USB development board for $9, on Indiegogo - [Link]

15 Mar 2014

20140312_205005-600x337

Frank Zhao shared his simple 6x USB charger with current monitor in the dangerousprototypes.com project log forum:

This is a simple 6 port USB device charger with a individual current monitor on each port. The charging current is indicated using RGB LEDs. Blue means slow charge (under 250mA), green means 250mA to 750mA, red means over 750mA, and purple means over 1500mA (for tablets). This circuit involves an ATmega328P (if you do hobby electronics, I bet you have plenty spares of these), INA169 (check out this breakout board), and a OKR-T10-W12.

Simple 6x USB charger with current monitor - [Link]


3 Mar 2014

ArduBoy-550x550

This is a great credit card sized business card and gaming console based on Arduino.

The primary trick of this design is having milled cutouts made for surface mount components to be press fit into, using the circuit board as a kind of frame. Components selected have a thickness near that of the circuit board (1.6mm). Furthermore, to minimize the board thickness, the Atmega328P is inverted so that the bulk of its height below the surface. The result of equal thickness and recessed installation provides a flush appearance. The primary benefit beyond the aesthetic quality is the device is easily slid from a wallet. The high quality boards and the excellent service from oshpark also makes this build possible.

[via]

Arduboy: The Interactive Digital Business Card - [Link]

25 Feb 2014

This soldering station controls a 24v 50W solder. Based on ATmega328p microcontroller, with combination of IRL3103 or IRFZ44 MOSFET, 5v 0.5A and 24v 3A power supplies,1500uF 35v capacitor, DS1307 – Real Time Clock, MAX7219 – 4 digit 7 segment LED driver, LEDs and other electronic components. Hakko 936 soldering iron handle with thermocouple control. A LM358 amplifies signal from thermocouple with gain 101.

DIY Soldering Station - [Link]

25 Feb 2014

svkatz80 @ fritzing.org build a nice LED clock. He writes:

This clock is based on ATmega328p microcontroller, with combination of DS1307 – Real Time Clock, MAX7219 – 64 LEDs drivers, 74HC595 – shift registers, DS18B20 – temperature sensor, GL5528 – photoresistor, LEDs and other electronic components.

  • Clock with RGB seconds — Four 74HC595 control 10 RGB leds. But TLC5940 is a better choice.
  • Ellipse clock — Three MAX7219 control all LEDs. No shift registers needed.

Each MAX7219 can control 64 LEDs. For ellipse clock I used tree of them. The first one controls 2 hour’s digits (2x7x4=56 green leds + 6 blue leds + 2 dots between hours and minutes ). The second one controls 2 minute’s digits (2x7x4=56 green leds + 6 blue leds). The third MAX7219 controls second’s 60 red leds .

For making a 7 segment digits, I used 5×7 cm prototype PCB circuit board. Before solder the LEDs, I wired the board for 4 digits and 7 segments each of four boards with copper wire. See circuit.

As a main board I used a coroplast (polygal) sheet. Just print the sketch and make on polygal holes with a needle for LEDs.

ATmega328p based LED wall clock - [Link]

28 Oct 2013

ElectronicLoad200W-600x450

Kerry Wong built a DIY constant current/constant power electronic load. It can sink more than 200W of power:

A while back I built a simple constant current electronic load using an aluminum HDD cooler case as the heatsink. While it was sufficient for a few amps’ load under low voltages, it could not handle load much higher than a few dozen watts at least not for a prolonged period of time. So this time around, I decided to build a much beefier electronic load so it could be used in more demanding situations.
One of the features a lot of commercial electronic loads has in common is the ability to sink constant power. Constant power would come in handy when measuring battery capacities (Wh) or testing power supplies for instance. To accommodate this, I decided to use an Arduino (ATmega328p) microcontroller.

[via]

Building a constant current/constant power electronic load - [Link]

29 Sep 2013

DIGITAL CAMERA

Zak Kemble build a digital wristwatch with a 1.3″ 128×64 OLED display & AVR ATmega328P microcontroller:

The main incentive behind this project was to see how much I could cram, in terms of both hardware and software, into a wristwatch-like device that is no larger than the display itself. An OLED display was chosen for being only 1.5mm thick and not requiring a backlight (each pixel produces its own light), but mostly because they look cool. The watch was originally going to have a 0.96″ display, but this proved too difficult to get all the things I wanted underneath it. Going up a size to 1.3″ was perfect.

DIY OLED digital wristwatch - [Link]

10 Aug 2013

dingetje-600x400

Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

[via]

BareDuino micro - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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