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10 Aug 2013

dingetje-600x400

Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

[via]

BareDuino micro – [Link]

26 Jul 2013

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JeonLab @ instructables.com writes:

For relatively small (less number of pins than ATmega328) projects, ATtiny series, ATtiny45 or Attiny85 are good choice in terms of its physical size (8-DIP or 8-SOIC) and low power consumption. There are many ways to program it. One of the popular device is USBtinyISP and DASA. Both of them work very well with WinAVR (AVRdude).

ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP – [Link]

26 May 2013

mkii_slim_6

USBTiny-MkII SLIM programmer (AVRISP-MKII clone) supports all Attiny, Atmega, and Xmega µcontrollers. It has three programming interfaces: ISP, PDI, and TPI. It works with AvrStudio or AvrDude. Small convenient board, contains double direction voltage translator for all interfaces and working from 1,2V, jumper for target chip voltage selection 5V or 3,3V (LDO stabilizer), and status LEDs. The heart of the device is a AT90USB162 controller with hardware USB, so it can provide fast programming speeds.

USBTiny-MkII SLIM programmer – [Link]

15 Jul 2012

Atmel semiconductors have earned a big popularity all over the world. That´s why in our portfolio can be found a lot of standard stock types and upon request, we´re able to supply you with virtually any Atmel component.

AAVR, ATmega, ARM, ATtiny, 89C2051, 89S… these are the terms familiar to perhaps every developer of applications with microcontrollers. Atmel products have gained their reputation also thanks to a fact, that in their wide portfolio can be found microcontrollers for a wide spectrum of applications – from simple ones to relatively sophisticated powerful applications. Besides standard stock types, also many other types, can be found in our webshop, which we´re usually able to provide you within few days. Who ever tried to use any – even relatively simple and cheap microcontroller, knows, that such a component is able to add an unbelievable functionality and flexibility to a target device, most often inimplementable or only inefficiently implementable from discrete components. Atmel also provides a vast support in a form of application notes, development SW and HW, or examples in a source code – all are free to download at Atmel website.

Atmel components are here for you – [Link]


10 Jul 2012

Akafugu writes:

We’ve added a new sheet that covers most of the chips that were missing in the Atmel ATmega and ATTiny families, specifically the ones that come in only SMD packages. The chips included are ATtiny 4/5/9/10/20/40/24a/44/84a/43u/87 and 167. We’ve also added the ATmega8/48/88/268/328 in TQFP package which has a different pinout than the DIP package covered in the original reference sheet.

Microcontroller Reference Sheet SMD v1.0 – [Link]

14 Jun 2012

If you spend any time playing with Arduinos, ATtinys or looking at AVR spec sheets, you soon encounter a bewildering smörgåsbord of acronyms for various communication protocols. With examples such as I2C, LIN, SPI, TWI, USI, etc., it can get pretty confusing. What do these terms mean? How do you choose the chip that meets your needs? How do you make use of these protocols?  This guide will take the mystery out of all these acronyms, and provide a brief overview of what they mean and how you use them in your projects.

Guide to Arduino Communications – [Link]

12 Mar 2012

petemills.blogspot.com writes:

The ATTiny Candle is an LED candle. It uses a high brightness LED and some software to mimic the look of a traditional candle without the dangers associated with an open flame. I imagine they could be useful as movie props where you cannot afford to have a candle go out during a take or in your home in places not suitable for traditional candles such as in a wall niche or alcove.

ATTiny Candle – [Link]

3 Feb 2012

If your Arduino project has minimal IO needs, you may want to consider shrinkifying it. This video demonstrates High Low Tech’s method for programming an ATTiny with Arduino code. Maker Randy Sarafan has designed an 8-pin Arduino programming shield to make the task easier. [via]

Shrinkify your Arduino project – [Link]

21 Sep 2011

alfersoft.com.ar writes:

I’m still waiting for my cheap Bluetooth module from China which will serve as an input interface for my scoreboard project. In the meantime, I’ll show you how to convert your ATtiny microcontroller into a Pong game (with no input so far).

Tiny Pong: More fun with ATtiny45 and VGA – [Link]

2 Sep 2011

Want to play Pong on your Oscilloscope? @ Hack a Day – [via]

I always have! I don’t know why, but I like the idea of using an oscilloscope screen as a general use video display. Why not? In my case it sits on my desk full time, has a large screen area, can do multiple modes of display, and is very easy control. Making an oscilloscope screen do your bidding is an old trick. There are numerous examples out there. Its not a finished project yet, so be nice. It is actually rather crude, using a couple parts I had on hand just on a whim. The code is a nice mixture of ArduincoreGCCish…

The software runs on an Attiny84 micro controller clocked at 16Mhz, paired up with a Microchip MCP42100 dual 100k 8 bit digital potentiometer though the Attiny’s USI (Universal Serial Interface) pins. This is a fast, stable and accurate arrangement, but it requires sending 16 bits every time you want to change the value of one of the potentiometers so its also very piggy. I was just out to have some fun and did not have a proper 8 bit DAC. This was the closest thing outside of building one.
This project has a total resolution of 256x256x1. This sounds like a lot of resolution but don’t get too excited. You can have only a few hundred to maybe 1000 pixels on screen before it starts flickering pretty badly. I am sure this can be solved by someone who is not using GCC commands for almost all of an Arduino script, furiously tying to shove 16 or 32 bits of data out of its SPI port PER PIXEL with an Attiny that has no dedicated SPI.

Want to play Pong on your Oscilloscope? – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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