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16 Jun 2014

20140602_212346_kitassembling_80_fxsc600x300

Neven Boyanov @ open-electronics.org writes:

The Tinusaur is a small board with a ATtiny85 micro-controller on it. The board has the minimum required components for the micro-controller to work properly. It also has few headers to connect external components and connector for ISP programmer. The board could work with any of those DIP-8 chips such as ATtiny25/ATtiny45/ATtiny85, ATtiny13 as well as their variations.

The goal of the Tinusaur project is to have a simple, cheap and quick-start platform for everyone interested in learning and creating things.

The Tinusaur Project - [Link]

21 May 2013

RFID_reader_pic1

This is an 125 kHz RFID reader that is based on ATtiny13 micro-controller and an LM358 Operational Amplifier. No special RFID chip is used. The reading, decoding and printing the unique ID from 125 kHz RFID tags is made entirely in software by ATtiny13.

125 kHz RFID reader based on ATtiny13 - [Link]

 

11 Feb 2012

Dumb PC fans come with 3 pin jacks, and have no PWM control. This app note explains how to make a “smart” fan from a “dumb” one by implementing PWM control using an ATtiny13 microcontroller. [via]

This application note describes the operation of 12 volt DC  cooling fans typically used to supply cooling air to electronic  equipment: These fans are typically based on two-phase Brushless DC (BLDC) motors drawing between 1 and 50 watts of power. Single-phase brushless DC motors are also used in fans,  but this is outside the scope of this application note.

Further discussion describes the addition of an Atmel ATtiny13  microcontroller and the benefits this offers, such as variable speed by external thermistor input. An additional input is a PWM pulse width-varying signal, which also controls fan speed.

App note: PC fan control using an ATtiny13 - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

Pppd got tired of forgetting to lock his door so he made a door lock reminder. Once you open and close the door the device starts buzzing and doesn’t stop until you lock it. It is battery powered and uses ATtiny13, two reed buttons, and a buzzer. Source of the firmware is available. [via]

When the door gets opened it activates, powers up the second switch via PB3 and waits for the door to be closed again checking PB1 level. It then checks the lock status and keeps beeping until you lock the door (PB4 level).

DIY door lock reminder - [Link]


30 Jan 2012

Charalampos Andrianakis writes:

In the need of controlling a 7A 20Volt DC Motor i designed a speed controller with some cheap components. The circuit is a digital circuit and works with Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) which is one of the best ways to control a dc motor. This circuit can drive up to 33A 10V DC motor with a big heat sink placed on the switching mosfet.

Summarily i used in this circuit, the AVR ATtiny13 to control the PWM , a n-mosfet IRF540N for switching the motor and a Rotary Encoder to adjust the PWM Duty Cycle.

DC Motor Speed Controller - [Link]

20 Jun 2011

ermicro.com writes:

It’s interesting to explore what we can do with this tiny 8 pins; 8-bit microcontroller. The ATtiny13 is the smallest and cheapest Atmel AVR 8-bit microcontroller families but yet, it’s loaded with sophisticated peripherals such as two 8-bit PWM channels and 4 channels 10-bit ADC. Although the memory is quite small; 1 K flash, 64 SRAM and 64 EEPROM but this more the adequate for most PWM and ADC application, if you need more memory, bellow is the list of other Atmel AVR 8 pins microcontrollers which have compatible pins with ATtiny13 microcontroller.

Controlling DC motor with AVR ATtiny13 PWM and ADC Project – [Link]

6 Jun 2011

3W RGB mood lamp, a “mylonit” lamp from ikea. Powered from TNY245 based AC-DC converter. Next is Attiny13 based RGB driver, it not only can change colors, but has 3 modes and an automatic color and mode saving to eeprom memory – so after power up you always will see last seen mode and color.

3W “mylonit” RGB mood lamp - [Link]

6 Jun 2011

Simple meter on a HD44780 and Attiny13. This project has born from a pure curiosity – what we can made on this small uC? We can, and a lot. In this case this tiny will measure voltage, current, and temperature, recalculate, and in a nice way show on a 16*1 lcd. Despite on unusual solutions and few defects, it still can be used as a power supply meter. PCB dimension – only 35mm x 16mm

HD44780 and Attiny13 multimeter - [Link]

30 Mar 2011

blog.makezine.com writes: [via]

While most people would simply throw away an out-of-warranty iPod with a broken play/pause button, Craig gave his a new lease on life by attaching a custom-hacked dock connector. Inside the connector, he stuffed an ATtiny 13 microcontroller with a few other passive components. Now when he pushes the button on the connector, the ATtiny sends the appropriate serial command to the iPod to start or stop the music.

Custom Hardware to Fix Broken iPod – [Link]

7 Feb 2011

SolidSilver writes:

Take a dollar-store “flickering” LED candle, add an AVR ATtiny13 and a little code, and you get an LED candle that looks almost real.

Flickering LED Candle – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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