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1 Apr 2014

AVR

Evilthingamabober @ instructables.com writes:

Microcontrollers are, without a doubt, amazing little things. They are versatile, powerful, and extremely tiny. Unfortunately, the latter trait is also shared by both my wallet and my programming skills. My understanding of C is poor, and I can hardly afford to buy something like an Arduino or a decent ISP. And in any case, the Arduino would be overkill for many of my projects, which only need simple IC’s.

But as many of you know, DIY always finds a way. This tutorial is meant for those among us with no budgets or programming experience who want to start using these little machines. It is not based around the ATmega328 (the Arduino Uno chip), but rather the Attiny line of chips (the Atiny85 and Attiny2313, to be specific). The total cost of this project can go as lower than $15 if you know where to buy from, and you can still use the original Arduino IDE and language to program your projects in the end. Keep in mind that you will need some soldering skills to get this project done.

The Idiot’s Guide to Programming AVR’s on the Cheap - [Link]

13 Sep 2013

IMGA0436-Large

Attiny 2313 V-USB Media Volume Control. [via]

My most rewarding projects are the ones which i actually use. I like my audio gear so, this was the perfect companion project! On my desk i have a headphone amplifier for my AKG K702′s headphones, below it i have my self built Onixia integrated amplifier for my bookshelf speakers. I have been thinking about making a global volume control for both devices for quite some time… here is the results of my efforts.

Attiny 2313 V-USB Media Volume Control - [Link]

26 May 2013

79c2ec8dd1dae7bdc3e05f15cb7b298c.media.800x600

via avrs-at-leipzig.de:

In my new Dacia Duster is missing unfortunately an outside temperature indication. A finished thermometer with LCD did not separate from there while the contrast with sunlight usually particularly is. I had still alphanummeric LED display in red there for this project in the best way am suitable. As microcontroller i used a ATTINY 2313. The temperature sensor is a 1-Wire-digital sensor, thus the alignment of the sensor is void.

ATiny2313 Thermometer width DS18S20 - [Link]

2 Apr 2013

f-meter-1

This AVR-based Frequency Meter is capable of measuring frequencies from 1Hz to 10MHz with 1 Hz resolution. The hardware of this project consists of seven 7-segment displays, AVR ATtiny2313 uController, and a few transistors and resistors. The AVR counts input pulses for a precise 1 second interval (generated using the built-in Timer) and displays the result on the multiplexed seven segment LED displays. [via]

1Hz to 10MHz frequency meter using ATtiny2313 - [Link]


22 Jul 2012

Ian @ dangerousprototypes.com writes:

We came across Scott Harden’s brief article describing how to control an HD44780 LCD using an Attiny2313. After a number of unsuccessful attempts with other code he found this LCD library written by Martin Thomas for use with AVR-GCC. With a few mods to the code Scott produced the above results controlling his 2×20 LCD in 4-bit mode. The code provides for scrolling and wrapping and can even display Japanese characters. A handy tip for ATTiny2313 users.

ATTiny2313 controlling a HD44780 LCD via AVR-GCC - [Link]

 

20 Mar 2012

dselec.wordpress.com writes:

This is a countdown counter based on ATtiny2313, primary developed for my PCB exposure box, but it can be used for other purposes too.

The counting range is between 1 and 90 minutes and it can be adjusted with up or down buttons (high and low in the pictures).

After the desired time is set, the countdown starts by pressing the start/stop button (on/off in the pictures). By pressing the same button we can interrupt the counting at any time we want.

After the count expires we hear a beeping sound and the load is disconnected. By pressing start/stop button we reset the counter and we are ready for another lap. All actions included the time remaining are shown in the LCD display.

Pcb countdown timer - [Link]

12 Mar 2012

Phil writes:

My parents growing their own organic food and they asked me to deal with winter temperatures problem in the storage room. It gets really cold here, in Ukraine. Some winters have even lower temperatures than -30°C (-22°F). So right now I designing a simple thermostat for keeping temperature at about 5-7 degrees C above zero. Plus right now I started to use my garage as a gym, so this thermostat would be handy there too.

ATtiny2313 Based Thermostat - [Link]

1 Mar 2012

www.adafruit.com writes:

A little over a year ago, I started playing around with the newly available AVR ATTiny4313. It’s a neat little chip, and you can have a lot of fun with it. However, I soon got tired of wiring up programming headers, power supplies and all the other stuff you need to get up and running. I also grew wary of all this support circuitry taking up significant breadboard real estate.

To eliminate all that hassle, I created the BB313. It’s got all the stuff you need (programming header, regulated 5V power, etc.) wrapped up in a nice little package, and it plugs in on the edge of the breadboard so you have lots of space for other stuff. I also added an 6-pin connector for an FTDI cable or adapter.

I originally designed it for myself, but I figured other people might like it too, so I’m releasing it open-source CC-BY-SA 3.0) so you can make your own.

All the details and source files are at the project page. If you find it useful, please let me know!

BB313: A Breadboarding Platform for the ATTiny2313/4313 - [Link]

2 Feb 2012

Ejberg.dk has developed this project for a simple ATtiny2313 based servo tester – [via]

Ejberg.dk has developed this project for a simple ATtiny2313 based servo tester.

This device lets you test servos by varying the pulse width between limits of 0.8000 ms and 2.2000 ms selectable through the use of four buttons.

While the schematic shows an Atmel AT90S2313, the circuit will work with the popular ATtiny2313 using version 2.05 of the code downloadable from the ejberg site. He also has another version of this tester known as the ServoTester2 which uses the ATmega16P.

ATtiny2313 based servo tester - [Link]

22 Nov 2011

jumperone.com writes:

My parents growing their own organic food and they asked me to deal with winter temperatures problem in the storage room. It gets really cold here, in Ukraine. Some winters have even lower temperatures than -30°C (-22°F). So right now I designing a simple thermostat for keeping temperature at about 5-7 degrees C above zero. Plus right now I started to use my garage as a gym, so this thermostat would be handy there too.

It’s based around ATMEL AVR ATtiny2313 microcontroller, it will measure temperature using DS18B20 digital temperature sensor, and it has a 30A 240VAC relay to control heater.

ATtiny2313 – Based Thermostat Project - [Part1]+[Part2]+[Part3]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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