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19 Apr 2014

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smching @ instructables.com writes:

Use a ATTiny85 (can be ATTiny45, ATTiny44) to make an Arduino just for US3.00 and name it as Tiny Arduino.

Tiny Arduino have only eight pins as shown in figure above, Pin4 is ground (Gnd), Pin8 is 5V (Vcc), Pin1 is Reset, Pin2 and Pin3 originally used to connecting the Crystal. In order to utilize all the IO, the internal oscillator (RC Oscillator) is used to replace the external clock which require a crystal. Therefore the Tiny Arduino is now come with five IO. Below shows the Arduino IO functions.

Simplest and Cheapest Arduino - [Link]

12 Apr 2014

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rahulkar @ instructables.com writes:

This is a complete DIY project which requires a handful of components such as the ATtiny 85, LM35, MAX7219 and a couple of resistors and capacitors running off a regulated 5 V supply.
Temperature Measurement Range : 0 to 150′C / 32 to 300’F

Controller: ATtiny 85
Display type – 4 digit multiplexed 7 segment display (Common Cathode type)
Programming Language: Arduino
The setup can display both in Celsius and Fahrenheit. By default the temperature is shown in Celsius but can be toggled to display in Fahrenheit using the push button.

7 Segment Digital Thermometer using ATtiny 85 - [Link]

10 Apr 2014

hardwarehank @ instructables.com writes:

The Atmel ATTiny85 chip is an 8-pin MCU that is totally awesome. If you’ve been programming with the bigger boys (the ATMega series), these are a nice adventure – you’re rather limited in the number of output pins, but a creative design gives us a lot of flexibility in a very small package.

You’ve seen them – those “Apple computers.” Probably in the hands of some Hipster in Portland, while riding his fixie and wearing those thick framed glasses. That pulsating light when Apple laptops are asleep is so … sooooothing. You just want to go to sleep watching it. You know you do.

Today, we’re going to replicate that using our ATTiny85. It’s really easy, and most of it can be implemented in hardware instead of code (!!!).

Apple-style LED pulsing using a $1.30 MCU - [Link]

14 Feb 2014

Here is a very nice build of a LED heart that creates incredible animations. Check it out.

Today we present the perfect Valentine gadget: just shake it and it will turn on and crate incredible light animations. That will be cool for sure!

We know that, as it’s Valentine’s Day, looking at the device described in this post you’ll be inclined to think that this is the usual heart-shaped Valentine gadget: in reality this is something much cooler as it’s capable to create beautiful and complex light games. Is based on the smallest microcontroller manufactured by Atmel: the ATtiny85.

Hack your Valentine with HeartThrob - [Link]


4 Sep 2013

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adafruit.com launched a new little micro controller board board based on ATtiny85.

Trinket may be small, but do not be fooled by its size! It’s a tiny microcontroller board, built around the Atmel ATtiny85, a little chip with a lot of power. We wanted to design a microcontroller board that was small enough to fit into any project, and low cost enough to use without hesitation. Perfect for when you don’t want to give up your expensive dev-board and you aren’t willing to take apart the project you worked so hard to design. It’s our lowest-cost arduino-IDE programmable board!

Adafruit TRINKET – Mini Microcontroller – 3.3V and 5.5V versions – $7.95 - [Link]

10 Aug 2013

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Niek designed this BareDuino micro, that is available at github:

For some Arduino projects, you don’t actually need that many IO pins. That’s exactly the case when I tried to build a simple RGB throwie that would cycle through colours. I was looking for a cheaper alternative to the Arduino UNO’s ATmega328P when I stumbled across this post by MIT’s High-Low Tech lab. They developed a library for programming the 8-pins ATtiny45/85 from the Arduino IDE. It’s a very smart solution to use permanently in some low pin-usage projects, but you still need to hook up individual wires from your programmer to the ATtiny to be able to program it. That’s when I came up with the idea of the BareDuino Micro.

[via]

BareDuino micro - [Link]

26 Jul 2013

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JeonLab @ instructables.com writes:

For relatively small (less number of pins than ATmega328) projects, ATtiny series, ATtiny45 or Attiny85 are good choice in terms of its physical size (8-DIP or 8-SOIC) and low power consumption. There are many ways to program it. One of the popular device is USBtinyISP and DASA. Both of them work very well with WinAVR (AVRdude).

ATtiny programmer using Arduino ISP - [Link]

24 Jul 2013

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janw @ instructables.com writes:

A few months ago, I saw an instructable by fjordcarver on how to build a coloursensor with an RGB led and an LDR. It inspired me to try whether I could improve his design.

Here are the things that I wanted:
The sensor should have as few pins as possible.
It should work as a stand-alone device. All calculations should be done on the device.
It should have a triggered mode and a continuous mode.
All parameters should be programmable.
Calibration parameters should be stored in the EEPROM of the microcontroller.
Firmware updates should be made possible
And finally: size does matter ⇒ The smaller the better.

I did choose an smd attiny85 as the brain of the sensor. It has a small footprint but a large enough flash for the calculations. It also has just enough pins for the project (all eight pins are used).instructables.com

Build your own (at)tiny colour sensor - [Link]

27 Jun 2013

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Pedantite built his own Little Wire AVR programmer/tool:

The Attiny 85 has a neat feature that I had overlooked until I built this in that it has a built in PLL that lets you run the system off the internal RC oscillator at around 16Mhz. Many other AVR’s lack that PLL, and can only run at 8Mhz maximum without an external crystal.

[via]

Little Wire AVR-ISP - [Link]

19 Jun 2013

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Trandi made this simple DIY Servo tester based on ATTiny85:

I had to test a RC speed controller that I wanted to use to control an electric car window motor, and for the 100th time I was facing the same dilemma: find 8 batteries for my remote control, dismount the RX part from the quadcopter and use that, OR grab the Arduino and write quickly some code to generate the corresponding signals? Neither of which was actually particularly handy… So I finally decided to build a small stand alone servo tester.

DIY servo tester based on ATTiny85 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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