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9 Jun 2014

9M.Hirsch @ www.gearloose.net writes:

One basic need of a computer scientist is to measure the power that a USB device drains off the PC. This device is plugged between the PC and a USB device and displays the current on an LCD. For currents under 100mA it is displayd in 0.5mA steps and 1mA steps for currents over 99.5mA. It is built with an AVR programmed in assembler.

USB Power Monitor - [Link]

6 Jun 2014

3D_PCB_SMD_first

This project is a USB to Serial converter using an ATMEL AVR microcontroller. There are two version of the converter, one with SMD parts and another with TH parts. The mcu used is an ATmega8 and USB communication is done using software on AVR mcu. It’s based on the software USB implementation of AVR-CDC. Firmware can be downloaded from the download section of CDC-RS232.

USB to Serial Converter using AVR microcontroller - [Link]

6 Jun 2014

TinyPrime.preview

Spacewrench over at Dorkbotpdx writes:

This is a rebuild of the TeensyPrime project I built a while ago, using a separate breadboard that’s almost too small (I had to use magnet wire to fit some of the connections) and a microcontroller that’s almost too small. The ATTiny13A is a neat chip: AVR with 1K of flash, 64 bytes of RAM and 64 bytes of EEPROM. I programmed it using a Teensy-2.0-based waldo running Ward Cunningham’s TXTZYME.
The programming for this is actually kind of interesting. Every time you push the button, the AVR retrieves the currently-displayed number (which is stored in EEPROM), and then increments it, clicks the counter, and tests for primality. If the number isn’t prime, it increments and clicks again. When a prime number is reached, it stops and waits for another button press.

[via]

TinyPrime project based on ATTiny13A - [Link]

3 Jun 2014

3D_PCB_top_first

This is a dual MCU programmer which supports both AVR and PIC mcu and there is a switch to select between them.

It’s easy to manufacture and have only through hole parts.

Serial AVR and PIC programmer - [Link]

 


31 May 2014

cdc232-t45

CDC-232 creates a virtual COM port on PC that doesn’t have real RS- 232C port. It enables RS-232C communication (without control lines), after connecting the device and installing the driver.

Write the program to AVR, build the circuit, and connect the device to PC’s USB port. Install the driver on Windows. Access the device through generated virtual COM port from terminal software or your application. Control lines (DTR, DTS, RTS, CTS) are not used by the host application. Set the terminal software as “no flow-control”.

Windows requests the driver installation again when connected to other USB port. Detect the previously installed driver automatically. Another COM number will be assigned. If you set serial number in AVR (rebuild with modified usbconfig.h), you can get the same COM port at any USB port. However, you cannot connect multiple CDC devices of the same serial number.

Before detaching the device, close the COM port in terminal software or in your application. Otherwise, you cannot connect to the device again because of the broken file handle. Restart the terminal software or your application then. Switch to the fast transfer mode using “lowcdc.vbs” to get the baudrate higher than 9600bps.

CDC-232 – Virtual COM on ATMEL AVR - [Link]

26 May 2014

A demonstration of the relative stability of the internal and external oscillators.

AVR Oscillator Stability - [Link]

7 May 2014

compilers_campaign_news

MikroElektronika today announced that May 6, 2014 marks the 10th anniversary since it started developing compilers for Embedded programming – mikroC, mikroPascal and mikroBasic. The company will celebrate the occasion with a month long campaign that will include exclusive content, discounts and weekly full compiler license giveaways.

The successful release of mikroPascal for PIC in 2004 spawned an extensive product line that today has 18 compilers for six popular MCU architectures (ARM, PIC, dsPIC/PIC32, 8051 and AVR) that had a significant impact on the embedded electronics industry.

MikroElektronika celebrates a decade of compiler development - [Link]

20 Apr 2014

FRII89LHOHYDNQ9.MEDIUM

Here is how to make your own usbtinyisp

DIY $5 USBTinyISP - [Link]

18 Apr 2014

AVRISP_mkII

By ScienceProg:

Once you start building something with microcontrollers, one thing you need to take in to account is programming adapter. This is a device which allows to upload compiled code in to chip. I don’t know if this is still a fun to build your own DIY programming adapter which is not guaranteed to support all chips nor it will be safe and reliable. AVR microcontroller niche is one of most interesting when talking about programmers. If you take a look at AVRDUDE configuration file you will find that there is about 50 of them. Many of them are DIY while other are official.

Choosing right programmer for AVR microcontrollers - [Link]

17 Apr 2014

FLKLUX6HTK2J358.MEDIUM

Do you need a quick and easy way to program AVR chips. Did you know you can use your Arduino and the Arduino IDE? This Arduino shield makes the process much easier.

Arduino AVR Progamming Shield - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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