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21 Jul 2014

MediaTek-IC-close

by elektor.com:

MediaTek has announced the MT6795 which the company has targeted at the high-end android 4G smartphones and tablet segment. According to the press release the 8-core processor also supports 2560 x 1600 resolution displays, FDD/TDD LTE technology, 802.11ac WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, FM Radio, 2G and 3G wireless networks. The chip also supports video recording and playback at Ultra HD (4K2K) resolution using the H.265, H.264 and VP9 formats, supporting high-speed 1080p video recording at up to 480 frames per second allowing slow-motion playback on screens with 120 Hz refresh. An integrated 16MP camera image signal processor handles video input and MediaTek’s ClearMotion™ technology eliminates motion jitter to ensure smooth video playback at 60fps.

8-core 64-bit Processor targets Mobile Devices - [Link]

17 Jul 2014

FRTKREHHXMKMU36.MEDIUM

by intensePancake @ instructables.com:

In recent years, portable sensor devices have gained a lot of popularity due to their ability to give you instant, accurate information about your local environment. Some of these devices include the Sensordrone, Smart Citizen, and the Storm Tag. These devices combine portability and accessibility in such a way that they’re easy to use and convenient to carry around. However, they can be expensive, as they’re required to pack quite a bit of advanced technology into a very small package.

This Instructable is for my Bluetooth Low Energy Go-Anywhere Sensor Pack (BLEGASP, if you will). It’s a device that I built from an Arduino and various environment sensors. Since environmental concerns differ from person to person, I wanted to create a device that maximizes sensor modularity.

Bluetooth LE Go-Anywhere Sensor Pack - [Link]

7 Jul 2014

IMG_2876

by petemills.blogspot.com

An Arduino, some addressable LED’s, a bluetooth module, code and a 3D printer come together to make blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer. blueShift is so named for the Bluetooth protocol used for data communication, and the use of a tachometer to indicate when to shift your car. It may be amusing to note that the driver and passengers traveling in this car would observe Blueshift when peering thru the windscreen, provided their velocity was sufficient.

blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer - [Link]

24 Jun 2014

img_4646

By Alasdair Allan:

The Light Blue Bean is a new Arduino compatible board with built-in Bluetooth LE support, and while that isn’t a new idea, the Bean does something different than the other Bluetooth LE enabled Arduino clones I’ve seen so far—it lets you upload your code to the board wirelessly… look ‘ma, no wires!

Hands on with the Light Blue Bean - [Link]


10 Jun 2014

Untitled-1

By Panasonic:

Bluetooth® Low Energy (BLE) may not be part of your electronic designs just yet, but chances are it will be soon. This wireless connectivity technology has experienced explosive growth over the last three years. It now provides low-power connectivity to millions of electronic devices, such as smart watches, fitness trackers, smartphone accessories, and medical monitors. Thanks to upcoming technical enhancements, BLE is poised to become even more pervasive in the next generation of consumer electronics and the emerging Internet of Things.

Many of the enhancements have been incorporated in Bluetooth 4.1, a recent update to the core specification. Among them are support for more efficient bulk data transfers, greater flexibility in communications between devices, simultaneous dual-mode roles, and the first steps toward IP-based communications. Taken together, these technical improvements make BLE even more attractive from power consumption, performance, and cost standpoints.

In addition to the enhancements outlined in Bluetooth 4.1, the BLE chips themselves have been continuously improving. Thanks to efficiency improvements, transmission power consumption in the second generation of BLE will fall by about 66 percent with no loss of range or performance.

Moving Forward With Bluetooth Low Energy - [Link]

9 Jun 2014

blend

Blend Micro is an Arduino development board with built-in Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy (aka BLE or Bluetooth Smart) connectivity targeted at developers using the Arduino platform to design IoT applications. The board uses an Atmel ATmega32u4 micro-controller and the Nordic nRF8001 BLE chip.

The Blend Micro runs in the BLE peripheral role only, allowing BLE central role devices to establish communication.

Blend Bluetooth with an Arduino Platform - [Link]

5 Jun 2014

quick_jack

by elektor.com

Smartphone peripheral developers are limited to RF links via Bluetooth, NFC or WiFi when they need to pass data back and forth to the device. This can add significantly to costs and stand-alone peripherals also need batteries or an adapter for power. The Quick-Jack from NXP solves both problems; it turns the standard 3.5 mm stereo audio headphone socket found on most iOS or Android smart devices into a self powered data port and provides an interface for external switches, sensors or any other external equipment.

The Smartphone Quick-Jack Solution comprises a small board, a free example app for popular smartphone OSs, and design documentation.

Smartphone port? Try the Ear Hole - [Link]

 

28 May 2014

20140524040433-IMG_7677

Dynamic Near Field Communication tag, a new wireless technology that connects phones with MCU after wifi and Bluetooth, is your optimized NFC solution.

We are proud to bring about the Dynamic Near Field Communication tag (DNFC tag), an invention that who especially tech nerds and DIY lovers have been expected for long. It greatly outstands among traditional read-only NFC tags because it’s readable and rewritable and it can communicate with various platforms, to name several most popular: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Leaf Maple stm32 and some more. It owns a high level of dexterity, thus making it efficient, easy to execute and user-friendly.

The clue is in the name: Near Field Communication. It allows NFC portable devices to establish peer-to-peer radio communications, delivering data from one to another by touching them or putting them very close together. Basically, when you get your phone (if it has NFC as a feature) close to something equipped with NFC – like a tag – it invokes an action on your device.

DNFC Tag: the Pre-Eminent NFC Tag that Interacts with MCU - [Link]

22 May 2014

obr1527_1

Connectors M.2 also called as NGFF have a chance to become a widely used standard in computers, communication equipment and M2M applications.

The newest member of the data connectors family in our offer are connectors Attend series 123, so called NGFF – New Generation Form Factor connectors, also known as „M.2“. Their main advantage is implementation of PCI Express 3.0, Serial ATA 3.0 and USB 3.0. buses into one connector. The connector is considerable miniaturized and at the length of only 21.8 mm it has up to 75 pins ( 0.5mm pitch/ 50V/0,5A). M.2/ NGFF are designed as a future standard for SSD memory media, WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS/GNSS, NFC and other modules. As it´s not a “specialty” of one producer but it´s a connector designed as an international standard, their usage in your device can be advantageous thanks to a supposed easy availability even in the future. An important fact is, that connectors are produced with various keying (A-M). That provides a possibility to differentiate various modules on one board and prevents improper connection (PCIe x2, PCIe x4,…).

M.2 connectors are designed for a direct insertion of PCB, i.e. one part of a connection (M) is a PCB and another part is the connector (F). Connectors support various PCB widths – 12, 16, 22 and 30 mm. Depending on a type, M.2 connectors also enable a double-sided assembly of components on a PCB.

Another novelties from the Attend production in our stock are interesting types for SIM cards, as well as combinations 2xSIM(115L-AB380), 2XSIM + uSD (115M-AB360) and other, which can be found below this article.

Will a New Generation Form Factor become a new standard? - [Link]

21 May 2014

Luca Dentella has published his latest project: BlueMatrix. [via]

It’s a portable LED matrix display based on Arduino Uno, powered by a Lipo battery and connected via Bluetooth to a personal computer or an Android smartphone. I’ve also developed the controlling app for Android, available on Google’s PlayStore.

All the schematics, source files, inkscape files for the enclosure etc., are available on my blog and in my GitHub repository.

BlueMatrix – Bluetooth controlled LED matrix - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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