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22 Apr 2015

iphone-and-bean-side-by-side

The LightBlue Bean is a low energy Bluetooth Arduino microcontroller. Using Bluetooth 4.0, it is programmed wirelessly, runs on a coin cell battery, and is perfect for smartphone controlled projects.

SAN FRANCISCO and MINNEAPOLIS April 20, 2015 Punch Through Design, a hardware and software development firm making it easier to develop Bluetooth Low Energy products, announced that the company?s popular LightBlue Bean has been used to create the winning device at the Bluetooth World Hack Challenge.

LightBlue Bean – Zero wires. Infinite uses – [Link]

22 Apr 2015

DSCN0577-copia-624x832

by Jesus Echavarria:

This project starts a few weeks ago. My six years old daughter usually sleeps with a light on in her bedroom. Talking with her, we decide to hack her LAMPAN Ikea lamp to make some improvements, including a manual RGB controller to set the light colour, a timeout to turn off the light after 30 minutes without changes and a bluetooth connection to control the lamp with a smartphone or tablet. So, if you continue reading the post, you’ll see what we develop!

Hacking a LAMPAN IKEA lamp to add RGB light and BT – [Link]

21 Apr 2015

CypressEZ-BLEPRoC

by elektor.com:

Following on from the release of their PSoC 4 BLE chip at the Electronica Exhibition last year, Cypress Semiconductor Corp are extending their play in the Bluetooth market with the introduction of their new EZ-BLE module. The module contains the PSoC 4 BLE chip together with two crystals, an on-board chip antenna, RF shielding and passive components, all in a compact 10 mm x 10 mm x 1.8 mm form factor so that designers using the module can apply to add the Bluetooth logo on their products by referring to Cypress’s Qualification Design Identification (QDID) 67366, a unique serial number assigned by the Bluetooth SIG. The module is compliant with wireless regulatory standards in the U.S., Canada, Japan, Korea and Europe and offers a significant saving for designers in development, testing and certification costs.

Cypress Bluetooth Module – [Link]

6 Mar 2015

TexasSimplelink_300

by elektor.com:

TEXAS Instruments has announced the new SimpleLink ultra-low power wireless MCU platform. The platform has been designed to use so little energy it can be powered from harvested energy or will run for years on a coin cell. For versatility the platform supports multiple wireless connectivity standards using a single-chip and identical RF design. The SimpleLink ultra-low power platform supports Bluetooth low energy, ZigBee, 6LoWPAN, Sub-1 GHz, ZigBee RF4CE and proprietary modes up to 5 Mbps.

The first members of the SimpleLink devices to be introduced are the CC2640 which supports Bluetooth Smart and the CC2630 for 6LoWPAN and ZigBee. The CC2650 wireless MCU supports multiple 2.4 GHz technologies including Bluetooth Smart, 6LoWPAN, ZigBee and RF4CE. The support for such a wide range of radio standards helps future-proof designs and gives the ability to configure a chosen technology at the time of installation in the field. Planned for introduction later in 2015 are the CC1310 for Sub-1 GHz operation and the CC2620 for ZigBee RF4CE.

Ultra Low Power Wireless IoT Platform – [Link]


27 Feb 2015

BlueGecko

by elektor.com:

At the Embedded World conference held in Nuremberg, Germany this week Silicon Labs unveiled its Blue Gecko platform aimed squarely at Internet of Things applications. Silicon Labs have combined both their EFM32 Gecko MCU technology together with a 2.4GHz Bluetooth Low Energy transceiver (including a power amp and balun giving at least +10 dBm output power) on one die.

The 32-bit MCU inside the wireless SoC runs Bluetooth protocol stacks and scripting language developed by Bluegiga. Blue Gecko SoCs are based on ARM Cortex-M3 and M4 cores with 128 to 256 Kbyte flash and 16 to 32 Kbyte RAM. Silicon Labs are offering the complete Bluegiga Bluetooth Smart software stack for Blue Gecko modules and wireless SoCs. The stack implements the Bluetooth Smart protocol layers including the Attribute Protocol (ATT), Generic Attribute Profile (GATT), Generic Access Protocol (GAP) and security manager together with connection management.

Blue Gecko for the IOT – [Link]

10 Feb 2015

tinybt

The Zero Tiny BLE is a small low cost and low powered embeddable board with an AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller and a Bluetooth 4.0 (Bluetooth Low Energy or BLE) radio.
AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller running at 8MHz internal clock and 3.3V. ATTiny85 Datasheet.

HM-10 Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy module. HM-10 Datasheet.
Powered by single cell 3.7V Lithium Polymer battery (LiPo) or USB B mini port.
LiPo battery recharge capabilities via the USB B mini port.
Standard UART communication over Bluetooth 4.0.
Easy prototyping via breadboard.
Use either Arduino or AVR-GCC development environments.
Small form factor of 20mm x 47mm (0.79” x 1.85”)
You can purchase a complete board at zeroengineering.io
You can order unpopulated boards from OSH Park

Zero Tiny BLE – low cost and low powered embeddable board – [Link]

30 Jan 2015

DSC_8642

What a CAM Drive can or can not do:

A CAMdrive node must be selected according to the motor.
That is:
Stepper motors need a Stepper Controller of CAMDrive.
Normal DC motors need a CAMdrive-BrushedDCMotor controller.

To connect with Bluetooth, only one node needs the Bluetooth module. The remaining nodes are wired via the bus.

There is only one power supply required! No matter which node is connected, it supplies the remaining nodes and motors on the bus

It does not matter on which node the camera is connected, it all work “Camera” jacks simultaneously.

The bus connection is established via a standard network cable (patch cord).

CamDrive – an open source multi-axis control for time-lapse photography – [Link]

16 Jan 2015

Bob Alexander of Galactic Studios made this bluetooth serial monitor for embedded microcontroller projects, the Blueprintf:

One way of debugging microcontroller-based projects is to send messages out the UART serial port. Then, a UART-to-USB interface can feed the messages into your PC for display. But I wanted a small, portable device for viewing serial data without a PC, and I wanted it to use my cell phone or tablet for its display.
There are a few advantages to this. First, I don’t always have my PC nearby; maybe the project worked fine on my workbench, but doesn’t work “in the field” where I don’t have a PC handy. Second, the UART-to-USB interface sometimes hangs, especially if there are glitches from the system under test (SUT). Finally, sometimes I just don’t want to string the wires from the embedded system to my PC

Blueprintf – a bluetooth serial monitor – [Link]

7 Jan 2015

e890211c1753acfc8e4768a62ec575e7_large

Control your Bluetooth enabled devices with this open-source button that is only slightly larger than a micro SD card.

Tog can remotely control Bluetooth enabled devices such as smart phones, laptops, lights, locks and much more. When you press Tog it will wake up and communicate with your phone to execute pre-assigned actions. Tog ships with the ability to activate Siri/Google or take a picture on your smart phone with no apps required. Additionally, you may configure it to control or mute your music. The Tog design is open source so it can be modified to do whatever fits you.

TOG: The Ultra-Small Bluetooth Enabled Button – [Link]

26 Dec 2014

hc-05-breadboard-600x339

Phillipe Cantin writes:

So you want to two HC-05 modules to automatically connect together, as soon as they’re powered up and with zero code? Well this is your lucky day since this can be done using the AT+BIND command.
Let’s do this thing!
For this, you will need:
1 Arduino (I’m using UNO)
2 HC-05 modules
1 breadboard
Wires
Arduino IDE (I’m using version 1.0.5-r2)

[via]

HC-05 Bluetooth link with zero code – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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