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4 Feb 2012

coremelt.net writes:

This is an experiment board based on the new AVR ATxmega 128A1 microcontroller from Atmel. It features some nice gimmicks like an opto coupler, a RGB LED, a microSD card slot, infra red transmitter and receiver, USB, an external SDRAM and EBI extension header as well as a rotary encoder. The board has 6mil structures and hence is not home-producible (at least for the most of us). The board aims to be a general test bed for getting familiar with the new Xmega series. It could also be used as an application board.

It started out as a community project and I am about to spread about 100 pieces of this board into the crowd. We can expect some external contributions mostly in form of example code, which is rare at the moment. Although Atmel announced the MCU well over a year ago it is now that the first models become available in small quantities. This edgy character also establishes itself when it comes to the toolchain and programming tools and costs a lot of effort.

ATxmega128a1 development board – [Link]

3 Feb 2012

This is a development board for the PIC18F2550, I designed this board inspired by the TP-2550 development board by Giovanni Lafebre (site is in Spanish). Main difference between the original and my design is the size, mine is 10×8 cm, so it has less elements. This is because I created this board using the free version of Eagle, so I adjusted to its restrictions. [via]

Eaglefree18f2550 features:

  • 8 LEDs.
  • 4 push buttons with pull-down 220Ω resistors.
  • 2 potentiometers.
  • 1 relay with an active LED indicator. For using the relay, you must provide an external power supply.
  • 1 H bridge.
  • 1 barrel connector for H bridge power supply.
  • The board can be supplied from the USB or from an external supply (jumper selectable).
  • 5V regulator onboard.
  • ICSP port for PIC programming.
  • Jumper for enabling/disabling programmer voltage. This allows for the programmer to be powered from the board supply, so we can have the programmer plugged to the board all the time.

Eaglefree PIC18F2550 development board – [Link]

 

3 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Here is a breakout board for the PIC16F87X microcontrollers. It has a onboard 5V power supply, a 20MHz crystal, and a reset button, while all the IO pins have been broken out into a single row header, so its easy to interface with a breadboard. The UART and ICSP programing header have been broken out on the top of the board.

As  a bonus this board has a RS-232 level translator daughter board for easier interface with a computer serial port. The board can be built with the daughter board attached or without it.

nedoCPU-16: PIC16F87X breakout board – [via]

1 Feb 2012

 

Arup wrote a guest post about his Nokia LCD breakout board:

I designed a simple Nokia LCD Breakout board which allows you to interface any Nokia 6100 compatible display to microcontroller like PIC and AVR. The board itself provides 6.8volts for the backlight by a simple boost converter built up using a common 555 timer IC. There’s a switch to choose whether you want to work with 5V logic, or with 3.3V logic. [via]

Simple Nokia LCD breakout board – [Link]


20 Dec 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Phil made a DIY breakout board for the PIC16F883 microcontroller. The board uses a surface-mount single-layer design, and the parts are nicely spaced.  It’s an easy board to make at home using the DIY toner-transfer method of PCB etching. You can download the source files and other design data from his site.

DIY PIC16F883 breakout board – [Link]

28 Nov 2011

Brian was on our show and tell so we asked him to send along a follow upteho Labs. He writes – [via]

While Arduino gets the lions share of attention in the hobby community there are some limitations to 8-bit microcontrollers which have been recognized by the Arduino project with their recent announcement of plans to make ARM based development boards, as well at the Maple project (STM32 based). ARM microprocessors often offer significantly more RAM/Flash and peripherals at similar prices to traditional 8-bit microcontrollers, however they have a reputation for being harder to use.

In the maker community LPC and STM32 ARM based boards seem the norm, however in my experience LM3S (LM = Luminary Micro which is now owned by Ti) chips are far easier to work with. This is largely due to StellarisWare, which makes peripheral configuration uniform across devices. (See my comparison of UART configuration on many platforms here).

When I realized there were no inexpensive LM3S based boards available (now there are few on eBay as well) I decided to make some. I made a simple breakout style board called Cygni that was as inexpensive as possible so that people could try out ARM and find out that it wasn’t scary after all. And I made two more advanced boards one that could be a USB host (called Eridani) and one that was suitable for tasks requiring a lot of memory, internet access, USB hosting or all of the above (called Procyon).

teho Labs – inexpensive LM3S based boards – [Link]

22 Nov 2011

jumperone.com writes:

Few month ago I wanted to try to write software for Microchip PIC16F883 microcontroller and I couldn’t find simple development board for it. And so I made my own.

It took me a couple of hours to design the board in Eagle and a couple more hours to make it with toner transfer method and solder it.

This development board is as simple as it gets. Just PIC16F883 controller in SO28W package, linear regulator with two selectable voltages 3.3V and 5V. Bunch of pinheaders connected straight to the MCU I/O pins, pinheaders for VCC and GND, and programming port.

PIC16F883 Development Board – [Link]

10 Nov 2011

Basic kludges: 5 minute SOIC-DIP adapter @ Evil Mad Scientist Laboratories – [via]

So, you’re almost done building the new circuit board when suddenly… Doh! We’ve got the right chip handy, but only in the wrong package

5 minute SOIC-DIP adapter – [Link]

16 Jun 2011

An embedded development board for Altera FPGAs: [via]

CoreCommander development board is unique in the industry. It features the Altera Cyclone III FPGA that provides more than enough room for almost any embedded design.

This flexible board comes with a suite of SLS IP Cores, drivers, and application software. Delivered as a complete package, the board and soft content ensures quick and easy implementation of industry leading cores with reduced risk AND at a very low cost.

CoreCommander development board – [Link]

16 Jun 2011

Homemade QFP50 dangerous proto board test CNC precision:

I’m using the QFP50 dangerous proto board as a reference design to test the precision of a proxxon mf-70 retrofitted micro CNC. I’m quite happy with the results!

Homemade QFP50 dangerous proto board – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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