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17 Oct 2012

This document covers a few of the applications where lasers can be used during the fabrication of crystalline silicon
(c-Si) solar cells.

Manufacturing c-Si Solar Cells with Lasers - [Link]

27 Sep 2011

As renewable energy is becoming integrated into our everyday lives, new terms such as solar panel, photovoltaic and solar cell are more common and new devices, such as outdoor LED lighting are using this technology. The sun emits many forms of radiation. The best way to describe this is that there are ‘waves’ of energy that radiate from the sun at different frequencies.

This is only partially the truth as there is both a wave and particle nature to light.

The light spectrum is divided into different sections. It begins with the highest, gamma rays and ends with the lowest, long wave radio. Only a small portion of this is visible, called the visible spectrum and this occurs towards the middle of the range which lies between Ultraviolet and Infrared frequencies. Ultraviolet radiation is what burns the skin and can cause skin cancer. It is blocked by most types of glass and is partially reduced by the atmosphere especially the ozone layer. Infrared radiation is what provides the earth with heat and it is that which is trapped by green house gasses, carbon dioxide mainly and is causing global warming.

Infrared radiation is targeted by solar panels. This basically uses the energy generated by the radiation to heat water in pipes that flows and generates electricity. This can be used to charge a battery which could then power said LED lighting. As mentioned previously there is a dual nature to light. It consists of both a particle and a wave. It might help to think of the particles moving in a wave like pattern but the reality is more complex than that. The important thing to remember is that the light particle, the photon, is what is targeted by a solar cell. Read the rest of this entry »

15 Jul 2011

 

The sheet of paper looks like any other document that might have just come spitting out of an office printer, with an array of colored rectangles printed over much of its surface. But then a researcher picks it up, clips a couple of wires to one end, and shines a light on the paper. Instantly an LCD clock display at the other end of the wires starts to display the time.

Almost as cheaply and easily as printing a photo on your inkjet, an inexpensive, simple solar cell has been created on that flimsy sheet, formed from special “inks” deposited on the paper. You can even fold it up to slip into a pocket, then unfold it and watch it generating electricity again in the sunlight. [via]

Foldable array of solar cells printed on a sheet of paper - [Link]

4 Jul 2011

Traditional solar cell production techniques are usually time consuming and require expensive vacuum systems or toxic chemicals. Depositing chemical compounds such as CIGS on a substrate using vapor phase deposition also wastes most of the expensive material in the process. For the first time, engineers at Oregon State University (OSU) have now developed a process to create “CIGS” solar cells with inkjet printing technology that allows for precise patterning to reduce raw material waste by 90 percent and significantly lower the cost of producing solar cells with promising, yet expensive compounds.

Researchers cut waste and lower cost of ‘CIGS’ solar cells using inkjet printing technology - [Link]


19 Mar 2008

multi-purpose-charger.jpg

Mark: To keep the lights on and the camera going I have a multi-purpose battery charger. This contains around 24Wh of energy storage in eleven NiMh AA cells and circuitry to charge my laptop, satellite phone, mobile phone, camera battery and a PP3 for Ju’s Dog Dazer. It can also power a white LED tent light that sheds just about enough light to cook by. A cunning design means that some of the AA cells can be removed from the internal battery stack and exchanged with flat ones from a torch or whatever. [via]

Multi-purpose charger - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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