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31 Oct 2014

beatingbatte

by Rob Matheson @ phys.org:

Stream video on your smartphone, or use its GPS for an hour or two, and you’ll probably see the battery drain significantly. As data rates climb and smartphones adopt more power-hungry features, battery life has become a concern. Now a technology developed by MIT spinout Eta Devices could help a phone’s battery last perhaps twice as long, and help to conserve energy in cell towers.

Beating battery drain: Power-conserving chip may increase smartphone battery life - [Link]

10 Sep 2014
IBM's neurosynaptic processor puts 1 million artificial neurons and 256 million memory synapses on a single CMOS chip.

IBM’s neurosynaptic processor puts 1 million artificial neurons and 256 million memory synapses on a single CMOS chip.

One thing IBM emphasizes about its neurosynaptic chip is that it works like the “right” brain, which means intuition and jumping to conclusions, whereas the “left” brain works more like a traditional computer: R. Colin Johnson

IBM Builds World’s Biggest Brain-Chip - [Link]

9 Sep 2014

ltc3807_2

by elektor.com:

Adding to their ever growing family of power supply regulators Linear Technology have introduced the LTC3807 step-down switching regulator DC/DC controller driving an all N-channel external synchronous power MOSFET stage. The chip uses a constant frequency current mode architecture allowing a phase-lockable frequency of up to 750 kHz.

The chip draws just 50 μA no-load quiescent current and an OPTI-LOOP compensation allows the transient response to be optimized over a wide range of output capacitance and ESR values. The LTC3807 features a precision 0.8 V reference and power-good output indicator.

Low-loss Step-down Regulator - [Link]

2 Jul 2014

integrated-circuit-christies

David Szondy @ gizmag.com writes:

If it weren’t for the microchip, your smartphone would be size of a building and need its own power plant to work. Thanks to the integrated circuit and its modern incarnation in the microchip, electronics are a bit easier to carry around than that, and this week, Christie’s put one of the very first integrated circuits up for auction. Designed and constructed in 1958 by Texas Instruments, it’s one of the three earliest “chips” ever made and went on the block with an estimated value of up to US$2 million.

One of the world’s first integrated circuits goes up for auction - [Link]


16 Jun 2014

88-researchersd

by Matt Mcgowan @ phys.org:

Engineering researchers at the University of Arkansas have designed integrated circuits that can survive at temperatures greater than 350 degrees Celsius – or roughly 660 degrees Fahrenheit. Their work, funded by the National Science Foundation, will improve the functioning of processors, drivers, controllers and other analog and digital circuits used in power electronics, automobiles and aerospace equipment – all of which must perform at high and often extreme temperatures.

“This ruggedness allows these circuits to be placed in locations where standard silicon-based parts can’t survive,” said Alan Mantooth, Distinguished Professor. “The circuit blocks we designed contributed to superior performance of signal processing, controllers and driver circuitry. We are extremely excited about the results so far.”

Circuits capable of functioning at temperatures greater than 650 degrees fahrenheit - [Link]

28 May 2014
Interferometric TFT image

Interferometric TFT printed above an oxide covered (blue) metallization layer of a CMOS chip.

Stacking memory is just most obvious application of this ultra-cheap method of stacking 3D circuitry within the metallization layers of standard CMOS chips, but I’m sure that when designers put on their thinking cap they’ll find many more useful applications.: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

Chips On-the-Cheap Funded by SRC – [Link]

23 Apr 2014

Instructions for Soldering and Desoldering SMDs featuring up-close shots of fine-pitch soldering.

Surface Mount Soldering 101 - [Link]

3 Apr 2014

rcjGE_MEMS_switch_4G

The era of the MEMS switch may finally be here thanks to the research efforts of GE. Its MEMS chip, as small as 50 microns square, swathes as fast as 3 GHz and can handle up to 5-kiloWatts of power, making it a candidate for everything from industrial power control, to turning on light bulbs to switching antennas inside a smartphone.

MEMS Switch from GE claims fastest/highest Power Crown - [Link]

22 Feb 2014

If you have a simple Arduino project that uses only a few pins, you might be able to shrink it down to a single 8-pin ATtiny chip. In this video, Matt Richardson shows you how, based on a tutorial from MIT Media Lab’s High-Low Tech Group. The best part is you can use the same Arduino code and development environment that you’re already used to.

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects - [Link]

20 Feb 2014
medical-imaging1

A single-chip catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels is shown being tested. (Click image for high-resolution version. Credit: Rob Felt)

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart, and potentially allow more of patients’ clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery.

The device integrates ultrasound transducers with processing electronics on a single 1.4 millimeter silicon chip. On-chip processing of signals allows data from more than a hundred elements on the device to be transmitted using just 13 tiny cables, permitting it to easily travel through circuitous blood vessels. The forward-looking images produced by the device would provide significantly more information than existing cross-sectional ultrasound.

Single Chip Device to Provide Real-Time 3-D Images from Inside the Heart and Blood Vessels - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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