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3 Apr 2014

rcjGE_MEMS_switch_4G

The era of the MEMS switch may finally be here thanks to the research efforts of GE. Its MEMS chip, as small as 50 microns square, swathes as fast as 3 GHz and can handle up to 5-kiloWatts of power, making it a candidate for everything from industrial power control, to turning on light bulbs to switching antennas inside a smartphone.

MEMS Switch from GE claims fastest/highest Power Crown - [Link]

22 Feb 2014

If you have a simple Arduino project that uses only a few pins, you might be able to shrink it down to a single 8-pin ATtiny chip. In this video, Matt Richardson shows you how, based on a tutorial from MIT Media Lab’s High-Low Tech Group. The best part is you can use the same Arduino code and development environment that you’re already used to.

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects - [Link]

20 Feb 2014
medical-imaging1

A single-chip catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels is shown being tested. (Click image for high-resolution version. Credit: Rob Felt)

Researchers have developed the technology for a catheter-based device that would provide forward-looking, real-time, three-dimensional imaging from inside the heart, coronary arteries and peripheral blood vessels. With its volumetric imaging, the new device could better guide surgeons working in the heart, and potentially allow more of patients’ clogged arteries to be cleared without major surgery.

The device integrates ultrasound transducers with processing electronics on a single 1.4 millimeter silicon chip. On-chip processing of signals allows data from more than a hundred elements on the device to be transmitted using just 13 tiny cables, permitting it to easily travel through circuitous blood vessels. The forward-looking images produced by the device would provide significantly more information than existing cross-sectional ultrasound.

Single Chip Device to Provide Real-Time 3-D Images from Inside the Heart and Blood Vessels - [Link]

18 Feb 2014

swimchip

A research team from National Taiwan University, National Taipei University of Technology and Chang Gung University have described how they developed a free-swimming remote-controlled bare die at the IEEE International Solid-State circuits Conference (ISSCC) in San Francisco. The 21.2 mm square die made by TSMC using a 0.35 µm process, is able to travel at 0.3 mm/s submerged in a liquid. A similar device was presented at the ISSCC in 2012, which used Lorentz forces for propulsion. This design however uses electrodes along the four edges of the chip to generate bubbles as a product of electrolysis. [via]

A Free-Swimming Chip - [Link]


7 Feb 2014

IBM

In a paper published in Nature Communications researchers at IBM describe how they have built a silicon-based receiver chip incorporating GFETs or Graphene Field Effect Transistors (the purple structure in the photo) into the circuit. The multi-stage receiver integrated circuit consists of 3 graphene transistors, 4 inductors, 2 capacitors, and 2 resistors.

“This is the first time that someone has shown graphene devices and circuits to perform modern wireless communication functions comparable to silicon technology,”

said Supratik Guha, Director of Physical Sciences at IBM Research. In a test the team successfully used the graphene-based receiver to process a digital transmission on 4.3GHz. The binary sequence received was 01001001 01000010 01001101, which represents ASCII coding of the letters IBM.

IBM Chip uses Graphene FETs - [Link]

5 Feb 2014

Drag Soldering for Surface Mount Chips - [Link]

27 Jan 2014

This video shows the detail process of making of a chip at Philips Factory.

Chip Manufacturing Process – Philips Factory - [Link]

13 Oct 2013

Untitled4

The LTC4120 from Linear Technology is an all-in-one receiver chip for wirelessly charging battery-powered devices. It measures 3 x 3 mm and requires a pick-up coil at its input and a rechargeable battery at its output. A voltage is induced in the coil when it is in close proximity to the transmitter coil of a separate charging unit.

As well as the convenience of just placing your cell phone on a charging pad, this method is also ideal for hand-held devices that can’t use a conventional plug-in charger for reasons of hygiene or harsh/volatile atmospheres.

The battery charging functions allow for both constant current and constant voltage modes and a programmable float voltage level between 3.5 and 11 V accommodates a wide range of cell chemistries. An external resistor sets the charge current up to a maximum of 400 mA. It senses cell voltage and can initiate a low-voltage preconditioning phase if necessary. [via]

LTC4120 – Novel Contactless Battery Charger Chip - [Link]

8 Oct 2013

A look at some equipment and wafers used in the manufacture of silicon chip wafers. 200mm and 300mm wafers, die, dice sawing, lead-frame manufacture, automated testing machine (ATE) probing, clean room bunnie suits, photo plots, BGA chip thermal test sockets, and the worlds smallest active FET probes at 100 nanometers for direct wafer probing!

EEVblog #532 – Silicon Chip Wafer Fab Mailbag - [Link]

5 May 2013

Here’s an amazing new DNA testing chip by Panasonic together with the Belgium-based research institution IMEC. It delivers DNA results within an hour:

This is the chip we’ve actually developed. As you can see, it’s less than half the size of a business card. It contains everything needed for testing DNA. Once a drop of blood is inserted, the chip completes the entire process, up to SNP detection.

New chip delivers DNA results within an hour - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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