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23 Jul 2013

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Harrymatic @ instructables.com writes:

I am in the process of designing a function generator and I needed a frequency counter to check it against. This project uses a minimal number of components for a very economical and compact design. A bare-bones Arduino clone is at the heart of this project and the measured frequency is shown on an LCD display. The maximum frequency that this can measure is about 8 MHz (at a 50% duty cycle). Despite the fact that this counts the frequency on one of the digital pins, I have found that it will quite happily measure sine and triangle waves providing that they have a suitable amplitude.

8MHz Frequency Counter - [Link]

11 Feb 2013

Radmon - inside and outside

sites.google.com/site/diygeigercounter writes:

This project measures the background radiation outside the house, and transmits it to a display station inside the house. The outside sensing unit is solar powered (but it doesn’t have to be), and should have a range of at least 50m. The display station inside the house continuously displays the current background, and logs it to an SD card (along with date / time, temperature and other data). Daily high counts and other information are also displayed.

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station - [Link]

4 Nov 2012

A modular system of laboratory devices Hameg 8000 series is an ideal system for testing workplaces and school laboratories. At the same time it enables a very effective usage of space.

To have all we need on a table and to maintain enough space for a work – it is a stable challenge at a work with electronics. We may say, that for example a generator won´t be on my table today. But as it uses to be, after a while we´ll find we need just that instrument, which is missing on a table. Sometimes a solution is to stock them at each other, but we usually face the problem with a different size of instruments, or eventually also an instability of such a “set”. All this is solved by a Hameg 8000 series modular system.

The system consists of a HM8001-2, main unit, serving as a power supply and at the same time it is a holder – frame for any 2 instruments from the 8000 series (instruments don´t have their own power supply – for their operation they need to be inserted into the HM8001-2 basic module). Up to 5 such mainframes can be stocked at each other, what means up to 10 instruments. That brings a big saving of space and especially a comprendious and safe work. At the same time, it enables a big variability – for example usually a one mainframe + 2 instruments (according to an actual need of a given lesson) are usually sufficient for students in school.

Available modules:

  • HM80124¾-Digit Programmable Multimeter (max value 49999) with 0.05% basic accuracy, max. resolution: 10μV, 0.01dBm, 10nA, 10mΩ, 0.1°C, offset function and a relative value measurement, including an RS232 interface and software
  • HM801825kHz LCR-Meter, measures L, C, R, Θ, Q/D, |Z|, 0.2% basic accuracy, 5 measuring frequencies (100Hz, 120Hz, 1kHz, 10kHz, 25kHz), max resolution: 0.001Ω, 0.001pF, 0.01μH, 2- and 4-wire measurement, parallel and serial mode
  • HM8021-41.6 GHz Universal Counter, measurement range 0Hz…1.6GHz, 10MHz time base with 1ppm stability, 2 inputs – 1MΩ/ 50Ω
  • HM8030-610 MHz Function Generator, frequency range 50mHz…10MHz, output voltage up to 10Vpp (do 50Ω), waveforms: sine wave, triangle, square wave, pulse, DC, distortion <0.5% up to 1MHz, rise and fall time 15ns typically, internal and external sweep, FM (with option HO801), surge- and short-circuit-proof (ideal for testing and educational conditions)
  • HM8040-3Tripple Power Supply Unit 2x 0–20V/0.5A – 1x 5V/1A, 3-digit switchable displays (resolution 0.1V/1mA) , Pushbutton for activating/deactivating all outputs, adjustable current limiting and electronic fuse, low residual ripple and low noise
  • HM800Blank Module intended for customized instrument construction, inner guide for PCB mounting in 4 various levels, plastic front panel for easy mechanical processing, power is supplied by the HM8001-2 mainframe

As can be seen from this description, those are the quality instruments with very decent specification and with an excellent price/ performance ratio. Excellent properties are mainly proven in praxis, in a form of several 100 000 units sold all over the world. Detailed information will provide you datasheets at particular modules, series 8000 overview and the overview of options. In case of interest in any Hameg or Rohde&Schwarz instrument, please contact us at info@soselectronic.com

With the Hameg 8000 series devices you always have on a table all you need - [Link]

14 Feb 2012

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

My goal was to design a simple and user-friendly frequency counter which would be capable to handle radio FM frequencies and have an autonomous power supply. Powering it from batteries benefits to the device portability and makes working with it more convenient by eliminating a mess of power cords in a home lab. I use it just occasionally and a small size is a bonus simplifying its storage in a table drawer.

Most of similar devices I have found on the Internet use an LCD module with a built-in controller. Such a device draws pretty much current. Also, many high-speed counters use power-hungry ICs which makes it difficult for a battery operation. Finally, many projects are poorly documented which makes any modification unnecessary difficult. So, I started my own design which uses modern high speed and low-power ICs and can work from a single AA cell.

150MHz PIC Frequency Counter - [Link]

Fast Frequency Counter - [Link]


23 Nov 2011

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is 60 MHz frequency meter / counter for measuring frequency from 10 Hz to 60 MHz with 10 Hz resolution.It is a very useful bench test equipment for testing and finding out the frequency of various devices with unknown frequency such as oscillators, radio receivers, transmitters, function generators, crystals, etc. The meter provides very stable readings and has excellent input sensitivity thanks to on board amplifier and TTL converter, so it can even measure weak signals from crystal oscillators. With the addition of prescaller it is possible to measure the frequency of 1GHz and above.

60 Mhz Frequency Meter / counter - [Link]

27 Oct 2011

redferret.net writes:

For most of us, the threat of radiation poisoning is not something we often think of. However, there is always the possibility that some catastrophic incident will put some of us in danger. Now, I don’t know about you, but I can’t recall the last time I’ve seen my Geiger counter. So how do you tell if the area is unsafe? As it turns out, you can use your iPhone.

Don’t get me wrong, you really shouldn’t trust your phone as a completely reliable source of information regarding radiation levels. However, in a pinch, it can tell you enough to let you know if there is a danger. You see, the CMOS sensor doesn’t just record the light visible to your own eye, it can also capture Gamma and X waves emitted by radioactive sources. With the WikiSensor Dosimeter, you just cover the iPhone’s front camera with black tape, and run the program. The black tape prevents any light from traditional sources from being captured, yet still lets though the waves mentioned above. If these waves are recorded, then the software will let you know, and give you an idea of the risk. If you live in an area where you might be exposed to radiation at some point, this might be worth the $.99 price.

WikiSensor turns your iPhone into a Geiger counter - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Detect particles and/or make a cool random number generator with this handsome Geiger counter kit. This easy-to-make pack of parts turns a simple Geiger-Muller tube (included) into a portable blink, beeping radiation detector. You can also connect an FTDI friend to the header, to get serial output for datalogging on your computer.

Geiger Counter Kit – Radiation Sensor - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

enide.net writes:

A long time ago I built a radio using a Philips UV616/6456 TV tuner that is capable of receiving radio signals over a large range of frequencies. It ranges from 47MHz up to 860Mhz which gives me the possibility of decoding either Over-the-Air or Cable TV signals.

The problem is that the radio doesn’t have a frequency display, so tuning a particular frequency is always a challenge.

This project is about building a frequency counter, using a 2×16 LCD and a small PIC 18F1320 micro-controller.

VHF/UHF Basic Frequency Counter - [Link]

26 Jun 2011

Last June, I started with a LND712 Geiger Muller tube and a personal drive to create the most functional home-made Geiger counter on the web. I am now finished and here to write the story. One thing that I’m intrigued about is how these devices are currently a hot topic as the Japanese nuclear disaster has sparked an interest among many people.

A Geiger counter is actually a relatively old device so my goal was to create a modernized version of it. I have also implemented additional features such as a random number generator (RNG) and serial communication to PC.

Home-made Geiger Counter with RNG – [Link]

24 May 2011

bidouille.org writes: [via]

The Kvarts DRSB-01 (Кварц ДРСБ-01) is a simple consumer Geiger counter. It does not feature a display of any kind like most modern Geiger counters do, but instead each particle detected by the tube make a very characteristic “click”. It was manufactured in the early 1990′s and is not made any more, but you can still find it commonly on places like eBay. I got mine for about 15€ a few years ago, but unfortunately prices have skyrocketed recently after the events in Fukushima brought back the reality that is radioactivity into everyone’s minds.

Geiger Counter USB Hack – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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