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3 Jul 2014

obr1552_1

Switch-mode regulator Traco TSR 0.5 will give you as much as you need. If you have an application, where 0.5A is sufficient, then the new series of DC/DC modules is ideal for you.

Maybe, it´s worth to ask a question, whether it makes sense to use a switch-mode regulator for such a low current? For sure yes, at least because of two reasons. If we need to create 3.3V from for example 12V, then at a current of 0.5A a power loss of 4.35W appears at a classic linear regulator. That´s already a quite considerable power, able to heat up a device – especially at smaller enclosures and a dense population on a PCB.

Another reason is energy saving – especially at battery powered devices. Switch mode power supplies (SMPS) have a “genial” feature, that thanks to their high efficiency we use practically whole power drawn from a source, i.e. if we need say 5V/0.5A from a 15V source – we won´t take from it 0.5A but only approx. 0,17-0,18A.

Novelty of company Traco Electronic – series TSR 0.5 is by its function very similar to well known, proven DC/DC regulators TSR1 or TSRN1. The main difference is in a smaller allowed current and a feelingly lower price . That ´s why this series is very suitable for any application, where a current of 0.5A will be sufficient. A big advantage can be a wide operating temperatures range from -40 to +90°C (power derating 5%/K at temperature above 80°C). Maximum input voltage of 32V enables a usage even at power supplying from various alternative energy sources with a big input voltage fluctuations.

This novelty is so far available in a version with 5V output voltage (TSR 0.5-2450) and soon there will be another.

Why to pay for the current, which you won’ t use? - [Link]

1 Jul 2014

article-2014june-capacitor-selection-is-key-fig4

By Steven Keeping @ digikey.com:

Modular DC-DC switching voltage converters (or voltage regulators) are fully integrated devices that take away most of the complexity of power supply design — but not all. One of the key areas that are still left to the design engineer’s discretion is the choice of components for, and layout of, the energy storage and filtering circuits. In principle, these look like simple circuits comprising a few resistors, capacitors, and the energy-storage element, usually an inductor.

Capacitor Selection is Key to Good Voltage Regulator Design - [Link]

16 Jun 2014

ap_WE_inductor_8_design_tips

A practical guide for the selection of power inductors for DC/DC converters from Würth Elektronik. [via]

App note: Power inductors 8-design tips - [Link]

8 Jun 2014

article-2014may-dcdc-converter-topologies-fig4

by Ashok Bindra:

Whether it is used for biasing avalanche photodiodes (APDs) found in optical receivers, driving photoflash tubes in flash cameras, or charging high-voltage capacitors, the need for high-voltage sources continues to grow. Consequently, in battery-powered units where the input supply voltage is low, step-up or boost DC/DC converters are required to generate voltages that can be several times the input. To address these requirements, suppliers such as Analog Devices, Linear Technology, Maxim Integrated, and Micrel Inc., among others, have produced boost converters with output voltages at 70 V and above.

This article examines such solutions and discusses the topologies and techniques used by each to boost output voltages by ratios of 10:1 or better in order to generate high-DC voltages from very-low DC inputs.

DC/DC Converter Topologies and Techniques to Obtain High Boost Ratios - [Link]


5 Jun 2014

article-2014june-using-spread-spectrum-fig4

By Bill Saltzstein:

Switching DC/DC power supplies and regulators, regardless of whether IC, module, or chassis, are generally preferred over linear supplies, and with good reason. In general, they are much more efficient, resulting in reduced power use and cost, longer run time, and less heat to dissipate. (Note: There are cases where the linear supply may be more efficient, especially when the input/output voltage differential is small.¹)

However, there is a problem with switching supplies which affects many designs. Due to their inherent internal switching action, they generate more noise than linear supplies. The noise frequency is a function of the underlying switching frequency, which typically is between 100 kHz and several MHz, depending on design and application, and includes several harmonics.

Using Spread-Spectrum Techniques to Manage Switching Power Supply EMI - [Link]

5 Jun 2014

8365

The MAX20002/MAX20003 are small, synchronous buck converters with integrated high-side and low-side MOSFETs. Each device is designed to deliver up to 2A/3A with input voltages from 3.5V to 36V, while using only 15µA quiescent current at no load. Voltage quality can be monitored by observing the PGOOD signal. The devices can operate in dropout by running at 98% duty cycle, making them ideal for automotive applications.

MAX20003 – 36V, 220kHz to 2.2MHz, 2A/3A Fully Integrated Step-Down Converter - [Link]

5 Jun 2014

3D_PCB_first

This project is a 8-12Vdc to +48Vdc DC-DC converter based on MC34063 switching regulator. It’s a simple project of a DC-DC converter to make a phantom power supply for professional microphones. It can deliver 15-20mA at 48VDC. It ‘s based on MC34063 DC-DC step-up, step-down and boost converter. Input is between 8-12V DC and the output +48VDC/10-20mA.

9V to 48V DC-DC Converter - [Link]

22 May 2014

article-2014may-dcdc-converter-topologies-fig1

By Ashok Bindra:

Whether it is used for biasing avalanche photodiodes (APDs) found in optical receivers, driving photoflash tubes in flash cameras, or charging high-voltage capacitors, the need for high-voltage sources continues to grow. Consequently, in battery-powered units where the input supply voltage is low, step-up or boost DC/DC converters are required to generate voltages that can be several times the input. To address these requirements, suppliers such as Analog Devices, Linear Technology, Maxim Integrated, and Micrel Inc., among others, have produced boost converters with output voltages at 70 V and above.

DC/DC Converter Topologies and Techniques to Obtain High Boost Ratios - [Link]

17 May 2014

obr1523_uvod

DC/DC switch mode regulators TRACO will save the most precious substance – energy. And now they´re even more affordable thanks to a lower price and better stock.

Maybe, switch-mode regulators are familiar to you from your own praxis or at least from our articles New switch-mode stabilisers Traco TSRN-1 for positive and negative output or Try the effective replacement for standard 78xx regulators and many other.
Fortunately even in this segment it´s true, that thanks to a still bigger popularity of these regulators their price drops down. Moreover, thanks to our close cooperation with the producer – Traco Electronic AG and still bigger stocks we gain a better purchase price and that´s why a better sale price for you as a result. It´s the most obvious in the most popular versions like for example TSR1-2450 and TSR1-24120 with output voltage of 5V or 12V.And the main difference between series TSR1 and TMA? TSR is a so called POL (point of load, non-isolated) regulator, thus it works as “almost lossless load” (buck converter) regulating output power similarly like classic regulators (7805, 7812), only naturally with a substantially higher efficiency. Similarly excellent is also an output voltage stability at a load variation ( typ. 0,4% / 10-100% load). Series TSRxx has the same max. output current for all output voltages, i.e. for example 5V/1A or 12V/1A. In many applications it can be beneficial that TSR operates with up to 36V input voltage.

On the other hand, series TMA is an isolation DC-DC module with an output transformer operating at high frequency (tens to hundreds of kHz). Advantage of the TMA series is a complete galvanic isolation of an output voltage (so called floating voltage) and that´s why it´s suitable even for power supplying of various measuring probes, AD converters and other devices requiring isolated power supply or elimination of ground loops. Despite a significant advantage in a form of an isolated output this type of DC-DC modules has somewhat worse output voltage stability at a load change (max +-10%/20-100% záťaž). Max. output power is constant for a given series (TMA-1W, TMR-2, TEN3-3W, …) i.e. versions with a higher output voltage provide a lower current.

The most comprehensive overview of available DC-DC and AC-DC modules will provide you the short-form Traco catalogue and datasheets at particular types.

Traco TSR, TMA – when every Watt is precious - [Link]

14 May 2014

DCstepUp

Raj @ embedded-lab.com writes:

This 12V DC booster circuit uses the MC34063A device which contains all the primary functions required for DC−to−DC converters. It has a built-in temperature compensated reference, comparator, controlled duty cycle oscillator with an active current limit circuit, driver and high current output switch. It operates from 3.0 to 40.0V DC and can supply output current up to 1.5A. This booster can thus power your 12V load with a 3.7V Li-Ion battery.

DC booster for your 12V load - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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