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18 May 2011

astroboy907 writes:

This project would be about medium level for a novice, but *hopefully* still provide somewhat of a challenge for more experienced users, as they get into the code and work on improving this. “This” that I have mentioned multiple times, is an Arduino clock, based off of a 4 digit display. I have named this project the “TimeDuino” (but if you have a better name, do not hesitate to add it in the comments!). Its a simple 4 digit clock, driven with Arduino and transistors. Well, enough boring you with the introduction, lets get to the project!

TimeDuino- Arduino based clock using 7 segment displays – [Link]

12 May 2011

adafruit.com writes:

1.8″ TFT Display tutorial! This tutorial is for our 1.8″ diagonal TFT display & microSD breakout board. This breakout is the best way to add a small, colorful and bright display to any project. Since the display uses 4-wire SPI to communicate and has its own pixel-addressable frame buffer, it can be used with every kind of microcontroller. Even a very small one with low memory and few pins available!

TUTORIAL – 1.8″ diagonal TFT display & microSD breakout board - [Link]

29 Apr 2011

This tutorial describes in very detail about the basic structure of a monochrome LED dot matrix and how static characters and special symbols are displayed on it with a microcontroller.

Basics of LED dot matrix display – [Link]

 

21 Mar 2011

At Interaction 2011, a research group from Osaka University exhibited a fog display that enables multi-viewpoint observation. [via]

“Ordinary fog displays use a single projector with fog on a flat surface, but this display uses three projectors, each showing a different picture. So when the observer moves around the fog, they get a three-dimensional view.”

3D Volumetric Fog Display – [Link]


11 Mar 2011

Using the Arduino development platform you will learn how to display numbers and letters on a single 7-segment LED display. There are many ways to drive 7-segment displays — this is a fairly simple method.

Arduino – Hooking up a 7-Segment LED Display – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

konstant.in writes:

The 4×4 LED Display was my first project with a two-layer circuitboard layout. The alignment was not 100% optimal, but sufficent. I wanted to make the board as small as possible, so the parts had to be stacked at some places. The square LED’s were painted black on the sides to keep the pixels sharp.

The rows and columns are both controlled by a 4094 Shift&Store-register. The upper four bits control the coloumns and the lower four the rows. So for each frame 4 bytes have to be shifted in.

4×4 LED Display – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

konstant.in writes:

I recently obtained a very old mobile phone from a friend. The battery was dead, so I dismantled it and to my surprise found a display with soldered contacts. In other mobile phones the display was connected via a conducting polymerpad, which was extremly difficult to use on selfmade circuitboards.

LPH7319 LCD display – [Link]

15 Feb 2011

lincomatic writes:

Yes, I know this has been done before, but I wanted to build my own, using as few parts as possible. I built this as a table top or wall mount model, but it can be scaled up to make a coffee table. I built it as a study for a more ambitious project, which will be an 8×8 RGB coffee table. In designing this project, I wanted to keep the part count and cost as low as possible, and also to design the software for speed and minimal memory usage.

Yet Another Daft Punk Coffee Table/Display – [Link]

14 Feb 2011

rsdio presents: 1-Wire network via an SPI-compatible display controller.

To produce the 3-wire SPI™ interface required by a MAX7221 display controller (active-low CS, DIN, and CLK), this 1-Wire network serially addresses three 1-Wire switches (DS2413). The first switch creates Chip Select directly (active-low CS), the second creates the serial-data line directly (DIN), and the third switch—with the help of three exclusive-OR gates—creates the serial clock (CLK).

App note: One-wire control of SPI peripherals – [Link]

13 Feb 2011

The fine hackers at Cincinnati, OH hackerspace Hive 13 recently finished up their glass block display LED sign, which is mounted in an outside window at their space. [via]

Glass block LED display at Hive 13 – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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