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10 Jun 2011

TDK Corporation has started mass production of a new translucent passive matrix organic electroluminescent display with QVGA resolution. The UEL476 display is fabricated using thin-film technology with an organic material that emits light in response to an electric current. It features high brightness, a wide viewing angle and other characteristics that make it very easy on the eye. [via]

TDK rolls translucent organic electroluminescent display – [Link]

31 May 2011

Fabien wrote a great tutorial on using the Adafruit TFT display with a Netduino. He writes: [via]

AdaFruit recently released a sweet little TFT display that I was dying to hook up to a netduino: the display features a resolution of 128*160 pixels, is capable of showing 18-bit colors and has a microSD card reader on the back of the breakout board. As usual, Limor wrote a nicely detailed Arduino tutorial showing how to connect the display and how to write sketches to drive it.

The Arduino driver relies on the ability of the Atmega168/368 to toggle digital lines extremely fast, which does not work well on the netduino due to the latency introduced by the .Net Micro Framework: even when configured to use hardware SPI, the Arduino driver constantly toggles a data/command output line, rspin below, which would be unbearably slow on the netduino if the same method were applied.

The netduino has one advantage over the Arduino: it has plenty of RAM. So, instead of toggling I/O lines slowly all the time and using next to zero RAM, the netduino driver allocates a 40K buffer corresponding to the resolution of the display in 12-bit depth colors (16 bits per pixel) and leaves the ST7735 in ‘data’ mode upon initialization.

Drawing always happens on the internal buffer first. Then, whenever the actual display needs refreshing, the display I/O operations are performed using hardware SPI, blasting the entire 40K buffer. It may sound crazy but using this method on the netduino is faster than refreshing a single pixel while toggling an I/O line!

Driving an Adafruit TFT Display with a Netduino – [Link]

18 May 2011

astroboy907 writes:

This project would be about medium level for a novice, but *hopefully* still provide somewhat of a challenge for more experienced users, as they get into the code and work on improving this. “This” that I have mentioned multiple times, is an Arduino clock, based off of a 4 digit display. I have named this project the “TimeDuino” (but if you have a better name, do not hesitate to add it in the comments!). Its a simple 4 digit clock, driven with Arduino and transistors. Well, enough boring you with the introduction, lets get to the project!

TimeDuino- Arduino based clock using 7 segment displays – [Link]

12 May 2011

adafruit.com writes:

1.8″ TFT Display tutorial! This tutorial is for our 1.8″ diagonal TFT display & microSD breakout board. This breakout is the best way to add a small, colorful and bright display to any project. Since the display uses 4-wire SPI to communicate and has its own pixel-addressable frame buffer, it can be used with every kind of microcontroller. Even a very small one with low memory and few pins available!

TUTORIAL – 1.8″ diagonal TFT display & microSD breakout board - [Link]


29 Apr 2011

This tutorial describes in very detail about the basic structure of a monochrome LED dot matrix and how static characters and special symbols are displayed on it with a microcontroller.

Basics of LED dot matrix display – [Link]

 

21 Mar 2011

At Interaction 2011, a research group from Osaka University exhibited a fog display that enables multi-viewpoint observation. [via]

“Ordinary fog displays use a single projector with fog on a flat surface, but this display uses three projectors, each showing a different picture. So when the observer moves around the fog, they get a three-dimensional view.”

3D Volumetric Fog Display – [Link]

11 Mar 2011

Using the Arduino development platform you will learn how to display numbers and letters on a single 7-segment LED display. There are many ways to drive 7-segment displays — this is a fairly simple method.

Arduino – Hooking up a 7-Segment LED Display – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

konstant.in writes:

The 4×4 LED Display was my first project with a two-layer circuitboard layout. The alignment was not 100% optimal, but sufficent. I wanted to make the board as small as possible, so the parts had to be stacked at some places. The square LED’s were painted black on the sides to keep the pixels sharp.

The rows and columns are both controlled by a 4094 Shift&Store-register. The upper four bits control the coloumns and the lower four the rows. So for each frame 4 bytes have to be shifted in.

4×4 LED Display – [Link]

2 Mar 2011

konstant.in writes:

I recently obtained a very old mobile phone from a friend. The battery was dead, so I dismantled it and to my surprise found a display with soldered contacts. In other mobile phones the display was connected via a conducting polymerpad, which was extremly difficult to use on selfmade circuitboards.

LPH7319 LCD display – [Link]

15 Feb 2011

lincomatic writes:

Yes, I know this has been done before, but I wanted to build my own, using as few parts as possible. I built this as a table top or wall mount model, but it can be scaled up to make a coffee table. I built it as a study for a more ambitious project, which will be an 8×8 RGB coffee table. In designing this project, I wanted to keep the part count and cost as low as possible, and also to design the software for speed and minimal memory usage.

Yet Another Daft Punk Coffee Table/Display – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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