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14 Dec 2013

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fowkc published his latest project the mains frequency display:

I wanted to make a display that could show the mains frequency to 3 decimal places. I’d be using the same seven-segment display modules that I used in my UNIX clock, so all I had to do was design the part that would work out the frequency.

[via]

Mains frequency display - [Link]

23 Jul 2013

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Harrymatic @ instructables.com writes:

I am in the process of designing a function generator and I needed a frequency counter to check it against. This project uses a minimal number of components for a very economical and compact design. A bare-bones Arduino clone is at the heart of this project and the measured frequency is shown on an LCD display. The maximum frequency that this can measure is about 8 MHz (at a 50% duty cycle). Despite the fact that this counts the frequency on one of the digital pins, I have found that it will quite happily measure sine and triangle waves providing that they have a suitable amplitude.

8MHz Frequency Counter - [Link]

2 Apr 2013

f-meter-1

This AVR-based Frequency Meter is capable of measuring frequencies from 1Hz to 10MHz with 1 Hz resolution. The hardware of this project consists of seven 7-segment displays, AVR ATtiny2313 uController, and a few transistors and resistors. The AVR counts input pulses for a precise 1 second interval (generated using the built-in Timer) and displays the result on the multiplexed seven segment LED displays. [via]

1Hz to 10MHz frequency meter using ATtiny2313 - [Link]

14 Feb 2012

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

My goal was to design a simple and user-friendly frequency counter which would be capable to handle radio FM frequencies and have an autonomous power supply. Powering it from batteries benefits to the device portability and makes working with it more convenient by eliminating a mess of power cords in a home lab. I use it just occasionally and a small size is a bonus simplifying its storage in a table drawer.

Most of similar devices I have found on the Internet use an LCD module with a built-in controller. Such a device draws pretty much current. Also, many high-speed counters use power-hungry ICs which makes it difficult for a battery operation. Finally, many projects are poorly documented which makes any modification unnecessary difficult. So, I started my own design which uses modern high speed and low-power ICs and can work from a single AA cell.

150MHz PIC Frequency Counter - [Link]

Fast Frequency Counter - [Link]


21 Jan 2012

What’s inside the FE-5680A Rubidium frequency standard? Available on ebay for about $50 or so.

PART 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I55uLRRvLCU

FE-5680A Rubidium Standard Teardown - [Link]

23 Nov 2011

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is 60 MHz frequency meter / counter for measuring frequency from 10 Hz to 60 MHz with 10 Hz resolution.It is a very useful bench test equipment for testing and finding out the frequency of various devices with unknown frequency such as oscillators, radio receivers, transmitters, function generators, crystals, etc. The meter provides very stable readings and has excellent input sensitivity thanks to on board amplifier and TTL converter, so it can even measure weak signals from crystal oscillators. With the addition of prescaller it is possible to measure the frequency of 1GHz and above.

60 Mhz Frequency Meter / counter - [Link]

22 Nov 2011

jumperone.com writes:

Very often when designing some stuff I need a square wave signal generator with variable pulse width and frequency to control power MOSFETS.

You can use such a tool when designing DC-DC converter or switch-mode power supply, you can use it to emulate PWM from microcontroller when developing some new embedded design, or maybe you want to design your own wireless charger… This is only some of the things you can use it for.

PWM Generator Project - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

enide.net writes:

A long time ago I built a radio using a Philips UV616/6456 TV tuner that is capable of receiving radio signals over a large range of frequencies. It ranges from 47MHz up to 860Mhz which gives me the possibility of decoding either Over-the-Air or Cable TV signals.

The problem is that the radio doesn’t have a frequency display, so tuning a particular frequency is always a challenge.

This project is about building a frequency counter, using a 2×16 LCD and a small PIC 18F1320 micro-controller.

VHF/UHF Basic Frequency Counter - [Link]

29 May 2011

microsyl.com writes:

Here is my new Frequency meter who was done with a LCD’s cellular phone!!! This is a simple project. The Frequency is passing through an op-amp to convert it in a square wave. The ouput of the op-amp is feeding the 3*8 bits counter (24 bits) who can accumulate at a maximum of 16777216 count.

Frequency Meter – [Link]

18 May 2011

damirvk writes:

To show that iPhone is not just a fashion accessory, as many like to say, read below how to make it a useful device. It is a frequency generator with solid characteristics. Quality will satisfy the needs of amateur electronics and it will be sufficient for the basic measurements and adjustments in audio technology.

iPhone as a frequency generator – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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