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19 Jul 2014

FBDJ9T4HXRWOJ9C.MEDIUM

by JamecoElectronics @ instructables.com:

Build a DIY geiger counter that uses a PIN photodiode as a substitute for an expensive Geiger-Mueller tube. It detects alpha and beta radiation particles. The circuit is soldered onto a small protoboard and everything is placed in an aluminum enclosure. Copper tubing and a piece of aluminum foil is used to help filter out noise and RF interference.

Pocket Photodiode Geiger Counter - [Link]

16 Jul 2014

minispec

By Ben Coxworth @ gizmag.com:

Ever since the Fukushima nuclear reactor disaster, there has understandably been an upsurge in the sale of consumer radiation-detecting devices. Most of these gadgets are variations on the Geiger counter, in that they alert the user to the presence and level of radiation, but not the type of radiation – which is very important to know. Researchers at Oregon State University are hoping to address that situation, with the MiniSpec. Currently in development, the handheld device will additionally tell its users what type of radionuclide is creating the radiation, and whether it poses a risk.

Small, portable and cheap radiation detector is being designed for the public - [Link]

15 Jul 2014

populated1

by Henrik’s Blog @ hforsten.com:

Ionizing radiation is something that almost anyone finds exciting (or scary) and I’ve also been for long wanted to build a Geiger counter. Unfortunately Geiger tubes have usually been too expensive to seriously consider buying them just for a hobby project. But I found out that sovtube sold soviet cold war era Geiger tubes only for a couple dollars. I bought one CI-22BG tube and one CI-3BG tube for total of 16€ including shipping from Ukraine to Finland. The site itself didn’t really convince me payment via Paypal failed because of invalid seller email address and gmail warned me that order confirmation e-mail might not have come from the address it claimed. However, I got both of the tubes and they seemed to be okay.

DIY Geiger counter - [Link]

11 Feb 2013

Radmon - inside and outside

sites.google.com/site/diygeigercounter writes:

This project measures the background radiation outside the house, and transmits it to a display station inside the house. The outside sensing unit is solar powered (but it doesn’t have to be), and should have a range of at least 50m. The display station inside the house continuously displays the current background, and logs it to an SD card (along with date / time, temperature and other data). Daily high counts and other information are also displayed.

Wireless Monitoring Geiger Station - [Link]


19 Jun 2012

Reka Kovacs writes:

We are building an ArduSat (according to the Cubesat standards a satellite 10 cm long at the edges and 1 kg or less), on this satellite we would put up to 5 Arduino’s and plug in 50+ sensors into them as well as 2 optical and 1 IR camera. Once the satellite is on orbit we would then give access to the general public/citizen scientists to the payload ( Arduinos, sensors and camera) to upload their own scientific experiments. We plan to capture the attention of the DIY community, hackers and makers, amateur astronomers and in general those interested in space exploration and the next frontier.

Sensor wise we have so far magnetometers, tachometers, plasma sensor, photometer, thermometer, pressure sensor, space radiation (bitflip) sensor, Geiger counter and 2 optical and 1 IR camera etc.The idea is that people can rent scientific packages for a week, during the week they run their experiment we will send data constantly back to them to analyze. Imagine general public, including teachers having access to experiment platform in space for a couple of hundreds of dollar and they analyze data and engage students, friends etc., it could revolutionize the way people see space. Also we are looking for feedback from people interested in the project. We want to hear their ideas or sensors and experiments!

ArduSat – Your Arduino Experiment in Space - [Link]

12 Jun 2012

John wrote in to show off his GPS/Geiger Counter Data Logger.

The enclosure is from Adafruit - about perfect, although it’s a pretty tight fit. The display is an OLED character display. (It’s a little quirky, and it draws more power than a regular LCD, but it’s really bright and clear.) The EM-406A GPS mounts on the top of the case. I drilled a small hole that shows the LED on the GPS module which lets me know when I have a fix. The IR detector is also on the top, so I can use a TV remote to set the parameters. The bottom has the on/off switch, (and now a piezo switch) and a slot that allows removal of the microSD card.

GPS Geiger Counter Data Logger - [Link]

12 Jun 2012

www.changpuak.ch writes:

This GM-Counter is build on 2 PCB’s. One is a standard high Voltage generating circuit, whilst the second is a Counter based on an ATMega16™ which also handles serial Communication with a host (Environmental Control).

The High Voltage generator is based on a 100 Hz Chopper, which is build around a ’555′ in combination with a standard Transformer and a Cascade to achieve Voltages from 400 to approx 900 V. (adjustable) The Regulation is just on-off (Burst) which will result in approx 1% Drift. This Circuit consumes about 20 mA at a 9 V (Battery). (more when starting up :-)

Homebrew Geiger Müller Counter - [Link]

7 Jun 2012

Sean Bonner writes:

We wanted to do something special for the Kickstarter community, who helped us get Safecast moving in the first place, and thought that a limited edition version of the geiger counter we designed, at a discounted price, would be a cool way to do that.

So here you go: a Kickstarter exclusive Safecast geiger counter. Limited clear plastic casing (like these pics), numbered edition of however many people pre-order them here. The only way ever to get this clear version is from this Kickstarter campaign. Obviously, this edition is a real working geiger counter, 100% functionally identical to the forthcoming retail release version.

Safecast X Kickstarter Geiger Counter - [Link]

30 Mar 2012

Safecast Geiger Counter Reference Design @ bunnie’s blog. [via]

Safecast Geiger Counter Reference Design - [Link]

26 Feb 2012

Sergei Bezrukov writes:

The radiometer is based on СБМ-20 Geiger counter tube which is manufactured in Russia and could be found on E-Bay. The counter is in a thin metal hull, so only beta and gamma rays can snick through it. It’s working voltage is in the range 350 – 450 V, the dead time does not exceed 190 μs, and the sensitivity is about 78 pulses per micro-roentgen. Therefore, maximum frequency of pulses provided by the counter is 106 / 190 = 5263 Hz. Respectively, the maximum radiation level one can register with it is 5263 / 78 = 67.47 μR/s, which is about 243 mR/h. The embedded firmware, however, can work up to 1 R/h.

Radiation dosimeter - Geiger counter - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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