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12 Jul 2014

What’s inside a 1991 vintage IBM PS/2 L40SX 80386SX laptop?

EEVblog #639 – IBM L40SX Retro Laptop Teardown - [Link]

4 Jul 2014
Four carbon nanotubes transistor channels are all controlled by the same local back gate.

Four carbon nanotubes transistor channels are all controlled by the same local back gate.

IBM has given itself a deadline of 2020 to perfect the nanotube transistor, for which there are significant technological hurdles: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

IBM Will Produce Nanotube Transistors by 2020 or Give Up - [Link]

3 May 2014

rcjNano_3Dprinter_IBM_NanoFrazor_SwissLitho_AFM

A microscopic 3D printer enables chip designers to quickly prototype new semiconductors structures as well as create light guides for photonics and quantum computers. [via]

IBM Debuts Microscopic 3D Printer - [Link]

7 Feb 2014

IBM

In a paper published in Nature Communications researchers at IBM describe how they have built a silicon-based receiver chip incorporating GFETs or Graphene Field Effect Transistors (the purple structure in the photo) into the circuit. The multi-stage receiver integrated circuit consists of 3 graphene transistors, 4 inductors, 2 capacitors, and 2 resistors.

“This is the first time that someone has shown graphene devices and circuits to perform modern wireless communication functions comparable to silicon technology,”

said Supratik Guha, Director of Physical Sciences at IBM Research. In a test the team successfully used the graphene-based receiver to process a digital transmission on 4.3GHz. The binary sequence received was 01001001 01000010 01001101, which represents ASCII coding of the letters IBM.

IBM Chip uses Graphene FETs - [Link]


17 Jan 2012

IBM Research – Almaden physicist Andreas Heinrich explains the industry-wide need to examine the future of storage at the atomic scale and how he and his teammates started with 1 atom and a scanning tunneling microscope and eventually succeeded in storing one bit of magnetic information reliably in 12 atoms.

IBM researchers store one bit of magnetic information in just 12 atoms - [Link]

20 Sep 2011

3M and IBM announced that the two companies plan to jointly develop the first adhesives that can be used to package semiconductors into densely stacked silicon “towers.” Processors could be tightly packed with memory and networking, for example, into a “brick” of silicon that would create a computer chip 1,000 times faster than today’s fastest microprocessor enabling more powerful smartphones, tablets, computers and gaming devices.

Adhesives for semiconductors - [Link]

15 Jun 2011

Using the Bus Pirate to read the SVP supervisor power on password off an IBM T30 Thinkpad: [via]

A friend of mine recently came upon an old IBM T30 Thinkpad at an auction for $40. Bringing it home, he found that there was a power-on supervisor password. This can’t be reset by removing the battery, as the pswd is stored on an EEPROM on the motherboard….. So it came to me!

I recently purchased a Bus Pirate v3 from Seeedstudio, and decided to give it a quick test run..

IBM Thinkpad T30 Bios password reset with the Bus Pirate - [Link]

15 Jun 2011

As detailed in this report, IBM has announced their first graphene integrated circuit. Graphene’s structure of one-atom-thick planar sheets of sp2-bonded carbon atoms that are densely packed in a honeycomb crystal lattice make it one of the thinnest semiconductor materials.

Further development using graphene should open the door to greater practicality of flexible electronics. While this technology is not expected to begin displacing conventional silicon circuits for a few years, when it does it should lead to bendable, transparent circuit boards revolutionizing the integration of embedded systems into common everyday items. [via]

IBM unveils graphene chip – [Link]

25 Jan 2011

30-minute film by Errol Morris, commissioned by IBM. Music by Philip Glass

IBM Centennial Film – [Link]

20 Nov 2009

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IBM scientists in Zurich have created a one-step point-of-care-diagnostic test, based on an innovative silicon chip that requires less sample volume, is significantly faster, portable, easy to use and can test for many diseases, including one of world’s leading cause of death, cardiovascular disease.

In this photo we see the capillary pump, which has a depth of 180 micrometers and contains an intricate set of microstructures, the job of which is to pump the sample through the device for as long as needed and at a regular flow rate, just like the human heart. This pump makes the test accurate, portable and simple to use. IBM scientists have developed a library of capillary pumps so that tests needing a variety of sample volumes or test times can still be done without having to re-engineer the entire chip. [via]

Biochip enables fast diagnosis of many diseases - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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