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17 Dec 2014

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Lukas of Soldernerd built a DIY Arduino-based inductance meter:

I’ve just finished a little Arduino project. It’s a shield for the Arduino Uno that lets you measure inductance. This is a functionality that I found missing in just about any digital multi meter. Yes, there are specialized LCR meters that let you measure inductance but they typically won’t measure voltages or currents. So I had to build my inductance meter myself.

[via]

Arduino-based inductance meter - [Link]

17 Jul 2014

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by BasinStreetDesign @ instructables.com:

I had a bunch of random inductors in some random drawers and I wanted to know what values they were. These values are quite often not obvious by looking at the device. Colour codes for old ones were not standardized and some of the coloured rings on inductors can be faded or discoloured so that its impossible to tell what they are. Others may be unmarked and any that are hand-wound are just guess work without a meter. So I decided to make an inductance and capacitance meter which would be fairly accurate and work over several decades of value from a few nano-Henries to a few milli-Henries and also from a few pico-farads to about a micro-farad (hopefully). Sounded easy – what could go wrong?

Inductance/Capacitance Meter Saga - [Link]

10 May 2014

by Paul Watson:

This beehive weight scale uses a TI LDC1000EVM inductance processor circuit to measure the weight of a Beehive, by detecting the the change in resonance due to a change in inductance, as the change in weight on the scale occurs. The processor sensed and measured differences; outputs are sent to a collocated laptop computer via a USB port and displayed by the TI software GUI on the screen. For this design concept, it was decided to design for a maximum of 160 lbs. The detailed PDF available below shows a range scale of desired performance, however the LDC1000 was not well understood by me at first, so this concept was a design to fit the unknown performance of the LDC1000, but adjusted to make it work.

Beehive scale uses inductive sensing - [Link]

21 Feb 2014

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Inductive Loop Detector is detecting the inductance change of a buried wire coil and thus it can be used to detect metal objects. by elektronika.ba:

Inductive Loop Detector works by detecting an inductance change in wire loop (coil) that is buried in road. It does that by measuring the frequency of the internal oscillator which powers the mentioned coil. When a metallic object moves over the coil it changes its inductance and that in turn changes the oscillator frequency which is measured by the microcontroller.

It is used for vehicle access control at door and barrier controls, for monitoring the occupancy and for vehicle counting in parking garages, traffic light installations and traffic controllers, direction and speed detection of vehicle traffic (if dual channel version is used), in car-wash plants, etc.

Inductive Loop Detector - [Link]


19 Sep 2013

Axialsensex600by Steve Taranovich:

Texas Instruments designers have developed an entirely new data converter with the LDC1000 inductance-to-digital converter (LDC) designed specifically for inductive sensing applications.

The LDC uniquely combines all of the external circuitry on chip that is normally required to simultaneously measure the impedance and resonant frequency of an LC resonator. It then regulates the oscillation amplitude in a closed loop to a constant level, while it monitors the dissipated energy of the resonator. This leads the accurate measurement of inductance of the front-end LC circuit, which enables precise measurement of linear/angular position, displacement, motion, compression, vibration, metal composition and new applications which will be conceived by designers. All of this can be done in the presence of oil, dust, dirt and moisture unlike most other solutions.

LDC1000 – Texas Instruments inductance to digital converter (LDC) - [Link]

25 Dec 2012

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Raju Baddi writes:

Bipolar junction transistors transfer a current from a lower-resistance emitter to a higher-resistance collector. You can use this property to measure inductance by connecting a series inductance/resistance circuit in the emitter and biasing on the transistor long enough for the current to reach a maximum value that is at least five LR time constants. When the transistor’s off time is equal to its on time but is still biased by a silicon diode, the LR current decays exponentially toward 0A. Using the transistor’s current-source property, you can measure this current without hindering the decay process in the LR circuit.

Use a transistor and an ammeter to measure inductance - [Link]

9 Mar 2012

embedded-lab.com writes:

An LCR meter is an extremely useful device for measuring three basic impedance elements, namely, Inductance (L), Capacitance (C), and Resistance (R). Recently, I got a TENMA 72-8155 digital LCR meter from Newark for review. I was very excited to receive it as I didn’t have a dedicated LCR meter in my home lab. Here’s my quick review of this product.

TENMA 72-8155 digital LCR meter - [Link]

29 Jan 2012

Moser from ReiBot has developed a simple project for using an Arduino along with an LM399 and several discrete components to measure inductance. He says: [via]

So you need to make or measure an inductor, but you don’t have an oscilloscope or signal generator? Measuring inductance with a handful of cheap common parts is certainly possible. I’ve verified this method is accurate with a scope from 80uH to 30,000uH, but it should work for inductors a bit smaller or much larger.

Easily measure inductance using Arduino - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

adafruit.com writes:

Hang around any electrical engineer long enough, and you’re bound to hear the word inductance tossed around. Or perhaps if you’re hanging around people dealing with high-speed signals, an ugly little thing called “cross talk” might get mentionned a lot (hint: it has nothing to do with speaking in an angry voice to your troublesome PCB, or any uncomfortable attempt to proselytize it and save it from eternal damnation in a lake of molten solder). If you’ve ever wondered what either of these terms mean (and how they’re related), you might find it worthwhile reading this relatively accessible ‘app note’ of sorts explaining what inductance is and why it matters: What Really is Inductance? (by Dr. Eric Bogatin)

What Really is Inductance? - [Link]

23 Nov 2011

circuitvalley.com writes:

This is very accurate home made LC inductance/capacitance meter built with very common components which are very easy to find all around . The range of this LC Meter is extremely good at measuring very low value of capacitance and inductance.

LC Meter’s Inductance Measurement Ranges:

  • 10nH – 1000nH
  • 1uH – 1000uH
  • 1mH – 100mH

LC Meter’s Capacitance Measurement Ranges:

  • 0.1pF – 1000pF
  • 1nF – 900nF

Very Accurate LC inductance / Capacitance Meter - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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