Home Blog  





20 May 2012

Jordan Bunker writes:

Conductive inks have a myriad of different interesting applications. As a quick, additive construction method for electronic circuits, they are especially intriguing. Unfortunately, for a long time they have been just out of reach of the hobby market. They are too expensive to buy in decent quantities, too complicated to make, too resistive to be practical, or require high annealing temperatures (which would ruin many of the materials you’d want to put traces on).

Now, though, thanks to some brilliant minds at the UIUC Materials Research Laboratory, you can make your own decent conductive ink!

Make your own Conductive Ink - [Link]

30 Mar 2012

Project: Conductive Ink by Jordan Bunker – [via]

Conductive inks have a myriad of different interesting applications. As a quick, additive construction method for electronic circuits, they are especially intriguing. Unfortunately, for a long time they have been just out of reach of the hobby market. They are too expensive to buy in decent quantities, too complicated to make, too resistive to be practical, or require high annealing temperatures (which would ruin many of the materials you’d want to put traces on).

Now, though, thanks to some brilliant minds at the UIUC Materials Research Laboratory, you can make your own decent conductive ink!
This ink seems to address many of the problems that other inks have. It’s particle free (won’t clog print heads!), is easy to make, and anneals to the conductivity of bulk silver at only 90 degrees Centigrade (194 degrees Fahrenheit).

After I stumbled upon this paper last month, I decided that I absolutely had to make some.

I am not a chemist, nor have I done any chemistry since high school, so I ended up having to buy both the glassware as well as the chemicals. Even after buying everything that I needed (and some stuff that I probably didn’t), I only spent around $150.

Conductive Ink - [Link]

28 Mar 2012

The paperless office clearly is an illusion as people continue to print and photocopy incredible amounts of emails, memos and other useless documents that end up in the bin. So if we cannot get rid of paper in the office, maybe we can remove the ink from it and then use the paper again?

An engineering team at the University of Cambridge in the UK has figured out how to erase pages by vaporizing common toners using a laser-based technique that doesn’t damage the underlying paper. The key idea was to find a laser energy level that is high enough to vaporize the toner without destroying the paper on which it is fixed. After many experiments it was found that 4-ns pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm (green light) worked best. [via]

Unprinter removes Ink from Documents - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

Silver Ink Solution For Cheaper, Faster Flexible Circuits – [via]

A silver ink for printing high-performance electrical circuits on flexible substrates has been developed by a team at the University of Illinois. Electronics printed on flexible substrates are gaining popularity with the rising desire for thinner electronic gadgets, wearable devices, and the nascent market for flexible screens.

The team was led by Jennifer Lewis, Hans Thurnauer professor of materials science and engineering, and Jennifer Bernhard, a professor of electrical and computer engineering. Lewis and graduate team member Brett Walker have published the work in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Silver Ink Solution For Cheaper, Faster Flexible Circuits - [Link]


2 Nov 2011

Conductive Silver Ink Pen – Micro Tip – [via]

Experiment with paper electronics with this silver conductive ink pen that will let you draw traces! We like the make of this pen, it has a nice liquid silver ink that flows easily, and it works great. In just 3 minutes from opening the packaging, we made the image above, a coin cell holder with an LED.

Conductive Silver Ink Pen - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

Conductive Silver Ink from a Ballpoint Pen via BB… [via]

Materials researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign have developed a highly conductive silver ink. In this video, Analisa Russo, a graduate student in the research group of Professor Jennifer Lewis shows exactly how to make this amazing ink, which could be used for a wide variety of hobby projects and in advanced electronics hardware.

Conductive Silver Ink from a Ballpoint Pen - [Link]

20 Sep 2011

Cool Tools: Cobra Ink System. Kevin writes – [via]

After much research and trial and error I found that the easiest cheapest method of printing is a continuous ink supply built into a printer. Once you are set up you can buy ink inexpensively by the pint, quart or gallon. A pint bottle of ink will cost no more than one of those itty bitty 1 oz. cartridges and will last hundreds of times as long.

A continuous ink system runs tubes from the refillable ink containers into the moving ink head in the printer. The printer operates normally. You simply refill the outside container with bulk ink and keep printing on the same originally installed cartridges. There are a number of outfits that will sell you a kit to do this yourself. I’ve heard of occasional satisfaction with this method. But installing this gear can get really messy and hairy. You are on your own if it does not work correctly. And some printer models are easier to retrofit than others.

Continuous ink supply printer mod… – [Link]

28 Jun 2011

(PhysOrg.com) — Two professors from the University of Illinois; one specializing in materials science, the other in electrical engineering, have combined their talents to take the idea of printing circuits onto non-standard materials one step further by developing a conductive ink that can be used in a traditional rollerball ink pen to draw circuits by hand onto paper and other porous materials. In their paper published in Advanced Materials, team leads Jennifer Lewis, Jennifer Bernhard and colleagues describe how they were able to make a type of ink from silver nanoparticles that would remain a liquid while in the pen, but would dry like regular ink once applied. The pen could was then used to draw a functioning LCD display and an antenna.

Researchers create rollerball-pen ink to draw circuits – [Link]

8 Jun 2011

erdabyz has been experimenting with soldermask on homemade PCB’s: [via]

I found it like a year ago, and I thought I had to give it a try. Bought a syringe and… my life has changed since then. Once you know how to use this stuff properly, your homemade PCB’s will never look the same.

Soldermask ink for homemade PCB’s – [Link]

3 Feb 2011

smartie_on_computer writes: [via]

For the past two years, I’ve been planning to build myself a 3D printer from some old Inkjet printers I had collected over the years. But not until two weeks ago had I actually started to work on it.

The 3D printer I want to made uses a ink jets to print a chemical onto a building platform. The building platform has a goes down as a new layer of power is spread onto it and the chemical sprayed from the print head will cause powder to bind.

Emulating ink cartridges – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits