Home Blog  





13 Jul 2014

obr1555_1

Discovering of overheating and joints with a high resistance has never been easier and safer. With the type Flir i3 now moreover price-affordable.

Thermal cameras, i.e. cameras sensitive in infrared range bring a useful information – picture with virtual colors responding to a temperature of a scanned surface. Maybe, at the word “thermal camera” you too get an idea about a well known usage in buildings – inspection of a heat leakage (thermal bridges) = status of a thermal insulation of buildings. But that´s only one of many ways to use these devices. In electronics and power engineering it´s far more interesting for example:

  • searching for faults on a PCB, optimizing of layout in respect to an even heat distribution
  • inspection of distribution boxes with cables, terminal blocks and circuit breakers
  • inspection of motors and transformers
  • inspection of cables interconnections (overheating caused by a high resistance)
  • inspection of cooling efficiency – heatsinks, fans, …
  • inspection of solar panels

…and all this at full operation and under (often high) voltage.

„I have an infrared thermometer, thus I need no camera” – this is a frequent opinion – until the time, you once try working with a camera. The joke is, that one picture from for example camera Flir i3 with resolution of “only” 60×60 pixels equals to 3600 measurements of an IR thermometer. It can be said, that one picture taken by the camera even exceeds 3600 measurements (done by an IR thermometer), because a spatial resolution of the thermal camera is usually better (surface measured by one pixel is smaller) than that of IR thermometers. This way it can happen, that a small source of heat (for example a small overheated component) can´t be discovered by an IR thermometer, while with a camera it will be clearly visible. Naturally, there are many applications where only an IR thermometer is sufficient, but cameras are far better for a professional usage and a maximum work efficiency.

That´s why we decided to incorporate into our offer the world renowned cameras from company FLIR, which is on the edge of development in this segment. As a standard stock item can be found type Flir i3 (3600 px) with resolution of 0.15°C and a viewing angle 12,5°x 12,5°. Big 2,8“ TFT display shows all necessary information and settings. Very advantageous is a possibility to store up to 5000 snapshots into a uSD card (2GB, jpg) and a consequent transfer of files into a PC through a USB. Further detailed information will provide you the Flir i3 datasheet.
Upon order we´re able to supply you any other type from company FLIR in a short leadtime..

Even hidden faults can be found with FLIR thermal cameras - [Link]

21 May 2014

rig_circuit

OK, this isn’t very innovative, but it’s still a fun weekend project. The setup starts with a transfer pipette, with a tiny hole made on top so that any water inside will slowly drip. This is followed by a jury-rigged optointerrupter: a fairly standard IR diode, a matched phototransistor, two 5 mm nylon spacers, top half of a polypropylene beaker, and copious amounts of hot-melt glue. The diode is connected to +5V through a 220 Ω resistor; the phototransistor uses a 10 kΩ one, in the usual topology. That’s good enough to detect the light that gets refracted by a passing drop of water.

Catching Drops of Water  - [Link]

7 May 2014

Marks_Spaces-1024x577-600x338

AnalysIR have shared a simple technique for viewing the data from IR transmission on an oscilloscope:

The idea is to use a standard IR Led mounted into a BNC/RCA plug using a spare channel making an Oscilloscope infrared receiver. So we set about ordering the connectors, which arrived in the post today. Another way of looking at this device is as a ‘poor-mans’ IR receiver, but if you have an Oscilloscope to plug it into then maybe you are not so poor after all. The idea is to shine your IR remote control on to the IR Led while pressing a key which results in a small amount of current passing through the IR LED. This in turn creates a voltage differential across the terminals of the Led. For this to work well, you need to have the emitter of the remote control right up against the IR LED of the receiver.

[via]

‘Silver bullet’ – the Oscilloscope Infrared Receiver - [Link]

28 Apr 2014

IMG_0437

An Attiny85 IR Biped Robot  by coretechrobotics.blogspot.de:

Although wheeled robots would be better for beginners I wanted to build a legged robot. Mostly because there were no continuous motors in reach and my attempt to modify a servo failed miserably.

One of the simplest solutions is a biped robot that moves as it shifts its weight. Two servos are needed for the feet and another two to move the legs to go forward or backwards. It is boring to just make the robot walk until the batteries are dead. So I decided to use infrared to receive commands.

An Attiny85 IR Biped Robot - [Link]


22 Jan 2014

This article describes how to use infra-red (IR) sensor with Arduino or with a simple OPAMP comparator. Lee Zhi Xian writes:

What is infra-red (IR)? Infra-red is an electromagnetic wave who wavelength is between 0.75 microns to 1000 microns (1 micron = 1µm). Since infra-red is out of visible light range, we can’t really see IR with naked eye. However, there is a method to “see” IR which will be shown later on. Some of the infra-red applications includes night vision, hyperspectral imaging, and communications. We also use IR daily in our TV remote or any device remote.

IR transmitter and receiver can be obtained at low price. Their shape is looks exactly the same as LED. To distinguish between transmitter and receiver, the transmitter always come in clear LED while receiver is black in colour. Other than that, there is also receiver that is used to pick up specific frequency IR, 38kHz. For your information, 38kHz frequency IR is commonly used in remote control.

How to use infra-red (IR) sensor with Arduino - [Link]

18 Dec 2013

FBCTV8JH7UR801K.LARGE

ricardouvina @ instructables.com writes:

Hello guys! In this instructable I’ll teach you how to make a very simple proximity sensor using infrared LEDs and Arduino.

Simple IR proximity sensor with Arduino - [Link]

8 Dec 2013

Application:

An IR detector that sounds a buzzer when an IR beam is broken, meaning the IR signal is lost.  A pulsed IR signal generator is necessary, but not included in this post.  This project would be ideal for doorwaLM311ys or hallways to alert when someone enters or exits an area.

Description:

The IR sensor responds to pulsed IR, not ambient or continuous IR.  This means that another transmitter project is necessary in order to complete this one!  Note though that some forms of lighting like fluorescent lighting may interfere with the sensor.  For convenience,  the the buzzer is internally driven so that a only Vdc is needed to make a sound.  In this case, the IR sensor senses 38kHz pulsed infrared light.

Pin 3 of the IR sensor is actually low (0V) while receiving a signal.  When the sensor is blocked from receiving the IR signal, the sensor outputs a high signal to the comparator, which then allows current through the LED/Buzzer circuit, and alerting you that the beam is broken. In the Scheme-It drawing the LM311 IC is a grouping of three components, in a functional block diagram style, to show how it functions in the circuit beyond what the pinouts would show normally.

IR Beam Breaker Alarm Circuit - [Link]

3 Oct 2013

NEC-Infrared-Remote-600x369

Gaurav Chaudhary writes:

This little project will demonstrate how you can build NEC protocol based Infrared Remote Control to use with various NEC Protocol IR receivers. actually there are lots of projects out there to accomplish this task but i have to write my own code because of too many requests on this IR(infrared) Remote Control Relay Board with PIC 12F675 Microcontroller people keep asking “Where is the Transmitter for this” although you can use any NEC protocol based remote ,but i just wanted to build one by my self. so here it is.

[via]

NEC Protocol Infrared remote control with a microcontroller - [Link]

20 Aug 2013

Imagex600

International Rectifier introduced the IR3823 SupIRBuck integrated voltage regulator designed for space-constrained, energy efficient netcom, server and storage applications. Steve Taranovich writes:

The IC delivers up to 3A a 3.5×3.5mm package. Efficiencies in excess of 97.5% are obtainable for designs converting power from a 6V input to a 4.8V output. The extremely high initial efficiency allows switching at up to 1.5MHz from a 12V supply to enable a complete 3A power supply solution in less than 130mm2. Featuring constant frequency and virtually jitter-free operation with synchronization capability, the new device is well suited to noise-sensitive applications, while the higher bandwidth reduces component count to shrink PCB footprint. A tri-level selectable soft-start feature is also offered for ease of sequencing.

IR’s integrated voltage regulator with 97.5% efficiency in a 3.5×3.5mm package - [Link]

31 Jul 2013

receiver

IR Communications for Atmel Mega644/1284 microcontrollers.

Infrared (IR) can be used for line-of-sight communications over low to moderate range. IR is nice because of the lack of interference (except for sun and compact fluroscent lights) and freedom from FCC regulation. The web site http://tthheessiiss.wordpress.com/2009/08/05/dirt-cheap-wireless/ (Jacob Sikker Remin, 2009) shows how to use a IR remote control receiver and IR LED to send ASCII serial data in a simple, but unreliable, fashion with no error control, packetizing, or other overhead. The transmitter drive uses a clever method to modulate and invert the serial output from the USART transmitter. The circuit is shown below.

Infrared Communications for Atmel Mega644/1284 microcontrollers - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits | Electronics Projects