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14 Oct 2014

DI5470f1

by Jordan Dimitrov @ edn.com:

While most carbon dioxide sensors use IR technology, electrochemical sensors are a serious competitor because of their high sensitivity, wide measurement range, and low price. As a rule, electrochemical sensors connect to a microcontroller through a buffer amplifier with an extremely low bias current (<1pA). The micro is needed to linearize the logarithmic response of the sensor. A good example of this approach is the SEN-000007 module from Sandbox Electronics, which uses an MG-811 CO2 sensor from Hanwei Electronics. Reference 1 reveals the circuits and the code, but does not specify accuracy.

Antilog converter linearizes carbon dioxide sensor - [Link]

17 Sep 2014

DI5455f2

by Martin Jagelka , Martin Daricek & Martin Donoval :

Continuous monitoring of heart activity permits measurement of heart rate variability (HRV), a basic parameter of heart health and other diseases.

This Design Idea is a new design of pulse oximetry that excels in its simplicity and functionality. Due to its capabilities, it can be used as a standalone device, able to monitor heart rate and oxygen saturation.

The core of the system is composed of the ultra-bright red LED (KA-3528SURC), infrared LED (VSMB3940X01-GS08), and a photodiode (VBP104SR) sensitive to both wavelengths of light at the same level.

Simple pulse oximetry for wearable monitor - [Link]

13 Sep 2014

20140901_171702

by Jose Daniel Herrera:

Here I present another project based on a addressable LEDs strip, based on WS2812b leds.

It consists of an ‘electronic’ candle, which lets you select set colors, adjust the intensity, and have different effects like rainbow, fade and fire. The project arose from the purchase of an IKEA lantern model BORBY … the idea was to replace a candle of considerable size, for something more … modern.

Candle with remote control and Arduino Pro Mini - [Link]

8 Sep 2014

IMG_0209

by Vadim Panov:

Back when I was only starting to dabble in electronics, I needed a project that would meet the following requirements:
simple to make;
original (i.e. done entirely by myself from scratch);
containing a microcontroller;
and maybe the most important of all, useful. I’ve had enough devices I assembled just to dismantle the whole thing a month later.
The thing I came up with at the time was a light swich for my room controlled over an IR remote from TV. Remote that I had used RC-5 protocol, hence the firmware is suited for any RC-5 compatible remote.
Everyone is familiar to the everliving problem with switching the lights off in your room before going to bed and stumbling back across the room. The IR switch I describe here solves that problem, and I can definitely tell that this project was a success – I am still using it with no regret.

Infrared remote controlled light switch with ATTiny2313 - [Link]


2 Sep 2014

SmartOutlet

by embedded-lab.com

Infrared remote control for home appliances is a popular project among hobbyists and students. Smart Outlet is a similar project that provides an infrared controlled AC outlet to connect any electric appliance and has an integrated timer in it. The appliance can be turned on and off from several feet away using an IR remote. The device is Arduino-controlled and has a LCD display to provide a menu based interface to the user for its operation and settings.

Infra-red controlled smart AC outlet - [Link]

25 Aug 2014

FDXBRBHHZ2IW5T8

Here’s a proximity-sensing LEDs project by Will_W_76. He writes a complete step-by-step instructions:

So how does this all work? What makes it proximity-sensing? Remember in the explanation above that the photo-transistor acts like a switch. So when the photo-transistor is off, no current is flowing across it to our blue LED and the LED is off as well. Now look at the other side of our circuit. That’s where the IR LED is connected, and it is connected such that it is always on and emitting 880nm infrared waves. Remember that I also mentioned the photo-transistor is set to respond best to wavelengths of 880nm? That’s how the proximity-sensing works! When an object (such as your hand) goes over this little “cluster”, IR light of 880nm is emitted from the IR LED. This light reflects off of your hand and back to the circuit. When the photo-transistor picks it up, it turns on allowing current to flow through from the source to our blue LED lighting it up!

[via]

Proximity sensing LEDs - [Link]

13 Jul 2014

obr1555_1

Discovering of overheating and joints with a high resistance has never been easier and safer. With the type Flir i3 now moreover price-affordable.

Thermal cameras, i.e. cameras sensitive in infrared range bring a useful information – picture with virtual colors responding to a temperature of a scanned surface. Maybe, at the word “thermal camera” you too get an idea about a well known usage in buildings – inspection of a heat leakage (thermal bridges) = status of a thermal insulation of buildings. But that´s only one of many ways to use these devices. In electronics and power engineering it´s far more interesting for example:

  • searching for faults on a PCB, optimizing of layout in respect to an even heat distribution
  • inspection of distribution boxes with cables, terminal blocks and circuit breakers
  • inspection of motors and transformers
  • inspection of cables interconnections (overheating caused by a high resistance)
  • inspection of cooling efficiency – heatsinks, fans, …
  • inspection of solar panels

…and all this at full operation and under (often high) voltage.

„I have an infrared thermometer, thus I need no camera” – this is a frequent opinion – until the time, you once try working with a camera. The joke is, that one picture from for example camera Flir i3 with resolution of “only” 60×60 pixels equals to 3600 measurements of an IR thermometer. It can be said, that one picture taken by the camera even exceeds 3600 measurements (done by an IR thermometer), because a spatial resolution of the thermal camera is usually better (surface measured by one pixel is smaller) than that of IR thermometers. This way it can happen, that a small source of heat (for example a small overheated component) can´t be discovered by an IR thermometer, while with a camera it will be clearly visible. Naturally, there are many applications where only an IR thermometer is sufficient, but cameras are far better for a professional usage and a maximum work efficiency.

That´s why we decided to incorporate into our offer the world renowned cameras from company FLIR, which is on the edge of development in this segment. As a standard stock item can be found type Flir i3 (3600 px) with resolution of 0.15°C and a viewing angle 12,5°x 12,5°. Big 2,8“ TFT display shows all necessary information and settings. Very advantageous is a possibility to store up to 5000 snapshots into a uSD card (2GB, jpg) and a consequent transfer of files into a PC through a USB. Further detailed information will provide you the Flir i3 datasheet.
Upon order we´re able to supply you any other type from company FLIR in a short leadtime..

Even hidden faults can be found with FLIR thermal cameras - [Link]

21 May 2014

rig_circuit

OK, this isn’t very innovative, but it’s still a fun weekend project. The setup starts with a transfer pipette, with a tiny hole made on top so that any water inside will slowly drip. This is followed by a jury-rigged optointerrupter: a fairly standard IR diode, a matched phototransistor, two 5 mm nylon spacers, top half of a polypropylene beaker, and copious amounts of hot-melt glue. The diode is connected to +5V through a 220 Ω resistor; the phototransistor uses a 10 kΩ one, in the usual topology. That’s good enough to detect the light that gets refracted by a passing drop of water.

Catching Drops of Water  - [Link]

7 May 2014

Marks_Spaces-1024x577-600x338

AnalysIR have shared a simple technique for viewing the data from IR transmission on an oscilloscope:

The idea is to use a standard IR Led mounted into a BNC/RCA plug using a spare channel making an Oscilloscope infrared receiver. So we set about ordering the connectors, which arrived in the post today. Another way of looking at this device is as a ‘poor-mans’ IR receiver, but if you have an Oscilloscope to plug it into then maybe you are not so poor after all. The idea is to shine your IR remote control on to the IR Led while pressing a key which results in a small amount of current passing through the IR LED. This in turn creates a voltage differential across the terminals of the Led. For this to work well, you need to have the emitter of the remote control right up against the IR LED of the receiver.

[via]

‘Silver bullet’ – the Oscilloscope Infrared Receiver - [Link]

28 Apr 2014

IMG_0437

An Attiny85 IR Biped Robot  by coretechrobotics.blogspot.de:

Although wheeled robots would be better for beginners I wanted to build a legged robot. Mostly because there were no continuous motors in reach and my attempt to modify a servo failed miserably.

One of the simplest solutions is a biped robot that moves as it shifts its weight. Two servos are needed for the feet and another two to move the legs to go forward or backwards. It is boring to just make the robot walk until the batteries are dead. So I decided to use infrared to receive commands.

An Attiny85 IR Biped Robot - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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