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6 Sep 2014

USBtinny84-Header-600x200

Rupert Hirst writes:

My through hole, home etch friendly version of the surface mount FabISP, which is based around the USBtinyISP AVR ISP Programmer. The new USBtinyISP drivers also support for Windows 8
This design uses the ATtiny84 microcontroller instead of the larger ATtiny2313 of the USBtiny.

[via]

ATtiny84 USBtiny AVR ISP programmer - [Link]

16 Jun 2014

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Neven Boyanov @ open-electronics.org writes:

The Tinusaur is a small board with a ATtiny85 micro-controller on it. The board has the minimum required components for the micro-controller to work properly. It also has few headers to connect external components and connector for ISP programmer. The board could work with any of those DIP-8 chips such as ATtiny25/ATtiny45/ATtiny85, ATtiny13 as well as their variations.

The goal of the Tinusaur project is to have a simple, cheap and quick-start platform for everyone interested in learning and creating things.

The Tinusaur Project - [Link]

4 Jun 2014

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Here’s an update on Kevin Rye’s LCD clock . Source files are available here, for direct download LCD-Clock-V2-Source.zip:

Once all the components and headers were soldered in, I attached my Arduino and configured it as an ISP. I then burned the bootloader for an Arduino Uno.
I then connected my FTDI programmer and uploaded the blink sketch.Success!

Wow, that LED is super bright! It’s actually blinding and kind of hard to look at. With that, I swapped out the resistor for a 1K one in order to bring the brightness down.
Knowing that the Atmega worked, it was time to solder in the rest of the components, except for the display. Again, I don’t want to come this far and then waste a $15 LCD.

[via]

LCD clock version 2 - [Link]

20 Apr 2014

FRII89LHOHYDNQ9.MEDIUM

Here is how to make your own usbtinyisp

DIY $5 USBTinyISP - [Link]


14 Apr 2014

ISPnub is a simple to use stand alone programmer intended for flashing AVR controllers in the field directly in the target system or during production. The module has only one button and two leds as user interface.

Features

– No external power supply needed. Uses voltage provided by target (1.8V to 5.5V).
– Programming counter. Limit possible programming cycles. After allowed cycles, no further programming is possible (module has to be erased/reprogrammed).
– One-button-programming: connect – push button – wait for red led off.
– Simple LED schema:
– green on = ok
– green blink = counter expired
– red on = programming
– red blink = error
– Define programming with simple script. Script converter generates HEX file for module.
– Load module with any ISP programmer which supports ATmega1284p
– 120kB memory space for programming data

ISPnub – Stand-alone AVR In-System-Programmer Module - [Link]

1 Apr 2014

AVR

Evilthingamabober @ instructables.com writes:

Microcontrollers are, without a doubt, amazing little things. They are versatile, powerful, and extremely tiny. Unfortunately, the latter trait is also shared by both my wallet and my programming skills. My understanding of C is poor, and I can hardly afford to buy something like an Arduino or a decent ISP. And in any case, the Arduino would be overkill for many of my projects, which only need simple IC’s.

But as many of you know, DIY always finds a way. This tutorial is meant for those among us with no budgets or programming experience who want to start using these little machines. It is not based around the ATmega328 (the Arduino Uno chip), but rather the Attiny line of chips (the Atiny85 and Attiny2313, to be specific). The total cost of this project can go as lower than $15 if you know where to buy from, and you can still use the original Arduino IDE and language to program your projects in the end. Keep in mind that you will need some soldering skills to get this project done.

The Idiot’s Guide to Programming AVR’s on the Cheap - [Link]

30 Jan 2014

FUOL56FHQVLDPCB.MEDIUM

In this article read about how to build an AVR ISP Shield for Arduino. phenoptix writes:

This Instructable is for the build instructions for our new AVR ISP Shield Kit for Arduino. Its development owes a great deal to Instructables and our own community (particularly Nick!) and I hope to explain some of that along the way.

Let me start by saying to program an AVR chip with an Arduino you don’t need a shield or even a crystal if you’re programming Arduino bootloaders. But if you plan on doing it more than once a shield is going to save you some headaches as setting up a breadboard each time and then worrying about debugging is a pain…

Building an ISP Shield for Arduino - [Link]

22 Nov 2013

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Jie Qi from the MIT Media Lab and Bunnie from Studio Kosagi are hoping to crowdfund their idea for a new method of circuit building called Circuit Stickers.

A crossover between high tech and arts and craft, Circuit Stickers are not a serious prototyping tool but aim to find new uses for easily configurable electronics circuits so that they can be incorporated into other media such as books (basic science or fiction) or even wearable electronics.

Interconnect and power tracks made from sticky copper tape (or other conducting material) are laid out on any non conducting surface such as paper, material or flexible fabric. The individual components come ready-mounted and connect to the copper tracks via pads with sticky anisotropic (Z) tape. These can be peeled off later for reuse. There are two kits available containing a sketchbook to take you through the basics, colored LEDs, sound, light and trigger sensors and a tiny microcontroller with an ISP programming connector. That old Tee shirt looking a bit tired? Spruce it up with a running light display. [via]

Circuit Stickers: Cut and Paste Circuitry - [Link]

13 Aug 2013

fabisp570

The FabISP is an in-system programmer for AVR microcontrollers, designed for production within a FabLab. That is, it allows you to program the microcontrollers on other boards you make, using nothing but a USB cable and 6-pin IDC to 6-pin IDC cable. It’s based on the USBtiny and V-USB firmwares, which allow the ATtiny44 to perform USB communication in software. Programming can be done through avrdude

FabISP, a fab-able in-system programmer - [Link]

11 Aug 2013

FWVAUYCHET1ER69.LARGE

AntzyP @ instructables.com writes:

What’s with mint boxes and electronics? Beats me, but they are somehow made for each other. I had built ladyada’s USBtinyISP v1.0 circuit on a breadboard which I used every other day. It worked sporadically(and never at hour of need), used up half of my breadboard and looked ugly. So I decided to try my hand at home PCB fabrication and build it in, of course, a tiny tic-tac box. Since I was a beginner, the circuit is easy and single-sided and uses crystal instead of ceramic oscillator.

Tic-Tac USBtinyISP Programmer - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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