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21 Jul 2014

obr1384_1

With a height of only 4.5 mm are new terminal blocks able to connect LED modules and LED panels aesthetically and with a maximal reliability.

There are numerous SMT connectors on the market, which are suitable for usage on LED panels but even in other applications. That´s why it´s a logic question – why just Wago 2060?

Firstly it is because of a sophisticated construction of a terminal block with a globally known and million times proven screwless spring clamp CageClampS. This clamp has an optimum pressure on a wire ideally responding to a wire diameter, i.e. the thicker wire, the bigger pressure. Also thanks to this is the max. allowed current up to 9A (!). Further, it´s possible to install solid and ferruled wires even without tools. By a simple pressing to a terminal block (for example by a screwdriver), it´s possible to insert even fine stranded flexible leads and by similar way also to disengage. Features of a clamp don´t get worse neither after multiple disengaging of a connection and they remain stable even after a long period of operation.

From other positives it´s necessary to mention a “balcony” construction of an input portion, which makes installation of wires easier and faster. Sufficiently big flat area ensures a reliable application on assembly machines (pick-n-place). And finally – an aesthetic curved shape and a white/cream color cause, that connectors are inconspicuous and they don´t disturb on a PCB.

Terminal blocks are available in 1,2 and 3-pole version. You needn´t be in doubt that you missed development and you still don´t know a circuit operating on 1 pole :-) – naturally the single-pole version is intended for connecting of several modules into series. A big plus is also availability of interconnecting both-sided pins enabling easy and aesthetic creation of a row (string) of several modules.

Pin spacing is 4mm and there´s also available a version with 8mm pin spacing with operating voltage of up to 600V. Connector casing is made of an advanced material (glass fibre reinforced PPA) with a very wide range of operating temperatures.

Novelty is also a newer version – Wago 2061 with up to 12A max. current. Detailed information will provide you the Wago 2060 brochure.

Wago 2060 terminal blocks don’t overtop LEDs - [Link]

19 Jul 2014

by TheSignalPathBlog:

In this episode Shahriar takes a close look at programming the popular NeoPixel RGB LEDs using a PIC microcontroller and C-language. A close-up of the NeoPixel (WS2812) LED is shown with attention to identifying various semiconductor elements inside the package. The principle operation of the LED is the described along with a detailed explanation of the pins and the one-wire communication protocol.

A simple evaluation board for the PIC18F4550 is used to drive a circular array of 60 NeoPixel LEDs from Adafruit. After presenting the difficulties of providing an accurate pulse-shape using the C-language, the measured waveform is shown on a Tektronix MDO4000B. Finally, the code for a circular color rotating pattern is presented and demoed. The code for the experiment can be downloaded from The Signal Path website.

Tutorial on Programming the NeoPixel (WS2812) RGB LEDs - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

SmartMatrix-Front-600x450

Pup05 shared his SmartMatrix project. He writes:

The panel fits perfectly, just had to shim it with a little bit of folded card stock on each side. There’s plenty of room for the Teensy and SmartMatrix board, wiring, SD card, etc. I cut out a piece of white printer paper to size, and placed it between the panel and the glass for a bit of diffusion. The magnetic feet that came with my panel from Adafruit fit perfectly, and keep the panel pushed against the paper and glass. I cut a notch in the bottom of the back, just big enough for the power cord, USB cable, and IR receiver.
I loaded up Craig’s LightAppliance sketch and made a few minor modifications, loaded up my SD card with the animated GIFs I wanted, and everything works great. Unfortunately, I already had my Teensy soldered on to the SmartMatrix board, and didn’t feel like pulling it off to solder the RTC crystal on to the back. I might do that later, and add the temperature sensor.

SmartMatrix project - [Link]

11 Jul 2014

FDVXCL4HX7P6P7Q.LARGE

Here’s a cool Mini LED volume towers project by Ben Finio. He writes a complete step-by-step instructions here:

The inspiration for this project started when I saw a variety of awesome stereo LED towers on YouTube (also referred to as VU meters). Many of the videos showed the end result, and maybe a slideshow of the assembly process, but lacked complete build details or a circuit diagram. So, I set out to find out how they worked, and build my own “mini” desktop version that would go nicely with computer speakers, instead of a big living room stereo. This Instructable will give you complete directions to assemble the required circuit (even if you have no electronics experience – you can even do it without soldering), build two LED towers, and hook them up to an audio input so you can simultaneously drive them and listen to music.

[via]

Mini LED volume towers (VU meters) - [Link]


9 Jul 2014

PWM_controller

Ondrej Karas of DoItWireless writes:

This is simple illustration how to build easy PWM LED control with IQRF TR module and a few other components.

This device is powered from 12V/6A DC power supply and can power up to 5m of LED strip. This device can be controlled via RF, buttons or potentiometer. RF controlling is compatible with remote control device RC-04 with low battery signalizing – fast 3 time LED blinking.

RF PWM LED control - [Link]

8 Jul 2014

mini-maglite-fig4

Jack Arcade @ jameco.com writes:

Flashlights are always useful especially if you like to camp like me. Out in the woods, when you are away from your iPhone flashlight, a Mini Maglite comes in real handy. Now, what if you hate its yellow color and carrying extra batteries? What if you want a white color for your flashlight and a longer battery life? Sound exciting? Let’s make one.

Convert Your Mini Maglite to LED - [Link]

7 Jul 2014

IMG_2876

by petemills.blogspot.com

An Arduino, some addressable LED’s, a bluetooth module, code and a 3D printer come together to make blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer. blueShift is so named for the Bluetooth protocol used for data communication, and the use of a tachometer to indicate when to shift your car. It may be amusing to note that the driver and passengers traveling in this car would observe Blueshift when peering thru the windscreen, provided their velocity was sufficient.

blueShift – An OpenXC LED Tachometer - [Link]

23 Jun 2014

photo-2

by www.viesurip.fr:

Here is a small personal project to brighten my home made from a cheap IKEA photo frame, and Arduino and a multicolor “NeoPixel” LEDs strip. The goal is simple: to realize a matrix of 12×10 big square pixels able to emit light in any color, and controllable from a smartphone. A simple demo video will explain the principle better (the LED flicker is due to the video and not normally visible)

A decorative LED frame  - [Link]

13 Jun 2014

FD51N05HW8T4M3B.MEDIUM

qubist @ instructables.com writes:

The Ultimate Altimeter is a super-compact, Arduino controlled altimeter capable of measuring the altitude with an accuracy of 0.3 meters, and saving the highest and lowest values it has measured. It is powered by a 40 mAh Lithium Polymer battery, uses a tiny LCD Bubble Display, and measures altitude with a MPL3115A2 Altitude Sensor. It’s very simple and fairly easy to build with just six major components. Additionally, an optional 3D printed case can house the Altimeter.

The Ultimate Altimeter – A compact, Arduino altimeter - [Link]

13 Jun 2014

LED-VU-Meter-2-600x450

xristost has written an article about his latest project LED VU meter with LM3916:

This was finished months ago and just now I had time to finish the article. LM3916 is a dedicated IC for VU LED meter. Unlike LM3915 which have 3dB step between voltage levels, the LM3916 have nonlinear steps: -20, -10, -7, -5, -3, -1, 0, +1, +2, +3db, just like old school analog VU meters. I saw in YouTube an interesting commercial LED VU meter, which imitates the needle movement in analog VU meters and I thought I can make a similar one. All I needed I found in the datasheet of LM3916. The LM3916 can be feed with AC signal without any rectification, but I wanted to implement a precision full wave rectification.

[via]

LED VU Meter with LM3916 - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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