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20 Jan 2015

obr1650_uvod

Only 0.5 mm thick (or thin) SMD LED Kungbright KPHCM-2012 can be placed practically everywhere, without increasing an overall PCB thickness. 

LED production technology currently surprises mainly on the field of white LEDs for lighting (SSL). But also color LEDs are getting still better as for the efficiency or for example in case of series Kingbright KPHCM – in miniature dimensions. Concretely series series KPHCM has standard „0805 SMD“ (2,0×1,25mm) dimensions, but unusual is it height – only 0.4mm. In reality, it appears so, that this LED will certainly be one of the lowest profile components on a PCB, hardly higher than a drop of a solder. This low-profile LED finds its place in all space-critical applications, for backlight of switches, displays and similar.Stock type – KPHCM-2012SECK is the red-orange LED (601 nm) with a relatively high luminiosity of 240 mcd (typ.). Similarly like at majority of standard diodes, maximum continuous current is 20 mA (abs. max. 30 mA). Detailed description will provide you the Kingbright KPHCM datasheet. Should you be interested in even smaller and thinner LED, than the KPG-1005 (1,0×0,5×0,2mm) series will be the right choice for you.


We have for you LED thinner than a solder drop - [Link]

20 Jan 2015

3795

LT3795 – 110V LED Controller with Spread Spectrum Frequency Modulation. by elektor.com:

It’s standard practice to use Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) signals to control electrical energy delivered to a load. Special precautions are however necessary to mitigate the effects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) generated when high-energy loads are regulated in this way. Spectral analyses of the interference generated show strong peaks at the fundamental and harmonics of the PWM frequency. For high-power switch-mode drivers used to control LED car headlights it is important to ensure the interference cannot disrupt radio or GPS reception. EMI filters and gate resistors can be used to slow down switching edges but have the effect of increasing energy losses.

Spread Spectrum LED driver - [Link]

19 Jan 2015

1412644_orig

by Joe @ hobbyelectronics.net:

This project was built to monitor the temperature of one of our computer rooms at work that has rather temperamental air-conditioning. The maximum temperature can be set, and if this is exceeded an alarm is activated.The unit gives a continuous display of current temperature and it’s possible for the constructor to change the device program firmware or display board.

LED display Over Temperature Alarm - [Link]

16 Jan 2015

system_debugging

by Nurgak @ github.com:

To measure my electricity usage I decided to build a small system that would count LED blinks on my power meter which indicate the used Wh. It was pretty straight forward system requiring an Internet connected microcontroller to log the data and some sort of sensor that would detect LED blinks on the power meter which is not my property and thus not accessible or modifiable.

The main reason to do this project is to get a better overview of the electricity usage as the house is heated by a heat pump so basically everything works on electricity or other free (thermal solar collector) and renewable sources (stove).

I had a CC3200 development kit laying around, it’s featuring a chip with Wi-Fi and an ARM Cortex-M4 processor running at 80MHz, it was more than enough to fill all the needs of this project.

Electricity usage monitor - [Link]


9 Jan 2015

F10EK0FHXLMQHWD.MEDIUM

by othermachine @ instructables.com:

Hello! Welcome to another Other Machine project tutorial! I’m Sam DeRose, a former Other Machine Co. Summer Intern. I created The Nerd Watch last summer while working at OMC.

The Nerd Watch displays the time in binary when the button is pushed. The watch shows the hour and minutes by flashing two LEDs in sequence to represent two 4-bit binary numbers (in big-endian format). Here’s a great description of how to read binary numbers.

In this Instructable, I’ll show you how to build a Nerd Watch from scratch with a few electronics components, and an OMC Othermill.

This Instructable presumes you have previous experience working with surface mount electronic components, and that you are no stranger to a multimeter or soldering.

The Nerd Watch - [Link]

8 Jan 2015

article-2015january-silicon-carbide-substrate-fig2

by Steven Keeping @ digikey.com:

The majority of contemporary LEDs are constructed from a combination of Indium gallium nitride (InGaN) and sapphire substrate. The architecture works well and has allowed LED manufacturers to offer products exhibiting efficacies in excess of 150 lm/W. However, the architecture does have some drawbacks which have encouraged chipmakers to seek other options.

One commercially successful alternative is silicon carbide (SiC), and LEDs based on the substrate have been on the market for two years. Now a new generation of the technology has been released that promises to double the luminosity of the current brightest single LEDs and cut lighting fixture costs by 40 percent.

Silicon Carbide Substrate Boosts LED Luminosity - [Link]

6 Jan 2015

by fw.hardijzer.nl:

A few years ago I built a red-only 32 pixels high, 96 pixels wide LED Matrix, and due to all the positive responses I sought out to do it again the year after with a bigger better matrix. I did some research into affordable solutions, and as usual ended up with Chinese vendors. I got my hands on about 10 32×16 RGB LED panels with a 1cm pixel pitch, and a HUB75 connection, quite similar to the ADAFruit 32×16 matrix. ADAFruit had a bunch of information on them, and there are several other places where they’re being used, so I figured I’d give it a shot. I even bought a Digilent Basys 2 FPGA development board, as these boards are apparently best driven by an FPGA, and I was willing to pick that up.

96×48 full-color LED Matrix - [Link]

2 Jan 2015

FCCN9WQI4CMONNQ.MEDIUM

by batkin @ instructables.com:

Get in the mood with some fairly simple ATTiny85 based DIY color shifting lamps!

Color Changing Mood Lamp - [Link]

2 Jan 2015

FOCGKWZI4CMIYAO.MEDIUM

by Jan_Henrik @ instructables.com:

Hi, in this Instructable I want to show you how to create your own diffusor for a LED Matrix. To do this we will use a 3D printer and OpenSCAD. In this tutorial I will use a LOL-Shield by Jimmie ( http://jimmieprodgers.com/kits/lolshield/ ) also I will explain, how to design a diffusor for different matrix sizes and shapes.

As I recently was at the 31C3 in Hamburg i got a LOL-Shield from Jimmie. This shield is holding 126 LED´s which are Charlieplexed. After coding some animations and a game on it I thought that the LED´s where too bright. Because I wanted to keep the greyscale ( dimming ) of the matrix I decided to design and build a diffusor.

How to make a diffusor for your LED Matrix - [Link]

2 Jan 2015

MCP79400

This project embodies the concept of I2C bus standard. It signifies how important to know the I2C devices and how they will be integrated. There are a lot of innovation can be made using the standard and more people are attracted to get involve in the embedded world professionally or just as hobbyist. The number of I2C devices included in this project may develop new ideas and designs.

The design includes 8-Bit Microchip PIC18F14K22 microcontroller which serves as the master of the I2C bus communication principle. The PCA9547D device is an 8-channel I2C-bus multiplexer with reset that communicates with the I2C devices one at a time. The PCA9500 device is an 8-bit I/O expander with an on-board 2-kbit EEPROM that simplifies the connection of LCD to the multiplexer. The MCP9801-M/MS device is a 2-Wire High-Accuracy Temperature Sensor for temperature monitoring. The 24LC025/ST device is a 2.5V, 2 Kbit Addressable Serial EEPROM (Tape and Reel) with no WP pin for firmware application. The MCP3221A0T-I/OT and TC1321EOATR devices are both for data conversion. The MCP3221A0T-I/OT is a Low Power 12-Bit A/D Converter With I2C Interface and the TC1321EOATR device is a 10-Bit Digital-to-Analog Converter with Two-Wire Interface. The MPL115A1 device is Miniature I2C Digital Barometer for pressure sensing applications. The MCP79400-I/MS is a Battery-Backed I2C™ Real-Time Clock/Calendar with SRAM and Protected EEPROM for applications that includes time. The PCA9530D device is a 2-bit I2C-bus LED SMBus I/O expander optimized for dimming LEDs in 256 discrete steps for Red/Green/Blue (RGB) color mixing and backlight applications. The 2X16 LCD is for display and monitoring application.

The design is very versatile since it opens up ideas to innovate. It is an excellent project for embedded system application. There are a lot of student will be attracted to develop their own design.

Interfacing MCU to various I2C Devices XD - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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