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25 Nov 2014

picture

This project provides some lighting effect by the blinking pattern of the bulbs connected at its output. Up to 8 Bulbs can be connected in between connector CN2 to CN9 and AC power to control them should be connected at Connector CN10. DC Power should be applied at Connector CN11 in accordance with the polarity marked on this connector. Care should be taken while using this it as it contains Main Power on the board.

Microcontroller based running light controller - [Link]

24 Nov 2014

FZLXPGWI2Q1H6GS.MEDIUM

by FabricateIO @ instructables.com:

Smart lightbulbs cost your firstborn child. Which is a shame, because smart lights unlock tremendous potential for home automation, energy savings, and all sorts of cool projects.

If only there was a way to control your lights without breaking the bank…

And now there is! For $19 on Amazon, you can get a 4-lightbulb kit from China that ordinarily is limited to 4 channels from a single remote…but with some creative hacking, can be used to control an unlimited number of channels using an arduino and a very simple RF module!

Cheap Arduino Controlled Light Sockets - [Link]

20 Nov 2014

IMG_1791-splash

 

Wireless. Easier. Safer. Longer Lasting Christmas lights. by Chris Higgins & Hardeep Johar:

The first ever wirelessly powered Christmas lights
Smartphone controlled energy efficient LED lights
Outshines any of the average Christmas lights by 20 years

AURA: The first ever, wirelessly powered Christmas lights - [Link]

6 Nov 2014

new controller

by jptds.blogspot.co.uk:

It’s not often that I finish the various small projects I undertake. Tesla coils, mass spectrometers, automated tomato plant watering systems, homebrew heaters have all been conceived and sometimes parts bought and assembled with some even making it as far as working. This project however made it all the way to finished.

Bike Light Controller Re-Design - [Link]


22 Oct 2014

ultra-low-power-light

by Dario Borghino @ gizmag.com:

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have developed a new low-cost flat panel light source that could pioneer a new generation of brighter, cheaper and greener lighting devices to rival LEDs. The device uses arrays of highly conductive carbon nanotubes to deliver evenly-distributed illumination with high efficiency and a power consumption as low as 0.1 Watts – about 100 times lower than that of light-emitting diodes.

Cheap, ultra low-power light source runs on just 0.1 Watts - [Link]

2 Oct 2014

blackoutbuddyh2o

by By Ben Coxworth @ gizmag.com:

It’s the big paradox of emergency-use flashlights … by the time you eventually need to use them, their batteries have died. Eton’s new Blackout Buddy H2O, however, will reportedly still work after sitting for up to 10 years. And to turn it on, you just add water.

This latest member of the Blackout Buddy line has a magnesium-oxide battery, which starts delivering power to the light’s three LEDs when exposed to H2O. To initially fire it up, you dip it into a small cup of water, or pour water into its battery compartment. After that, it will keep going continuously for up to 72 hours – if it starts to dim within that time, you simply add more water.

Blackout Buddy H2O runs on water to provide emergency lighting - [Link]

25 Sep 2014

bh1750_spark-600x450

Davide Gironi writes:

A Spark.io library for the BH1750FVI IC.
The BH1750 IC is a light intensity sensor module with built-in a 16 bit AD converter generating digital signal. With the BH1750 Light Sensor intensity can be directly measured by the luxmeter, without needing to make calculations. This library provides function to measure lux through I2C on a Spark Core.

[via]

Measure brightness in Lux using BH1750 sensor on Spark core - [Link]

8 Sep 2014

IMG_0209

by Vadim Panov:

Back when I was only starting to dabble in electronics, I needed a project that would meet the following requirements:
simple to make;
original (i.e. done entirely by myself from scratch);
containing a microcontroller;
and maybe the most important of all, useful. I’ve had enough devices I assembled just to dismantle the whole thing a month later.
The thing I came up with at the time was a light swich for my room controlled over an IR remote from TV. Remote that I had used RC-5 protocol, hence the firmware is suited for any RC-5 compatible remote.
Everyone is familiar to the everliving problem with switching the lights off in your room before going to bed and stumbling back across the room. The IR switch I describe here solves that problem, and I can definitely tell that this project was a success – I am still using it with no regret.

Infrared remote controlled light switch with ATTiny2313 - [Link]

31 Aug 2014

IMGP10016-600x450

madworm writes:

Just wanting to share one of my latest projects, made possible by DirtyPCBs. I got a lot of good boards (actually 2 designs) and saved 25$ using this service. Very nice.
It’s a simple thing, just a micro (ATmega168) + a bunch of WS2812B LEDs. Main purpose: more colours :-)
It’s meant to fit nicely into IKEA Samtid lamps, runs with 5V DC and takes up to 2.75A. The control module is removable, so one doesn’t have to rip the lamp apart every time you change code. I used microMaTch connectors, as they’re somewhat low profile, at least compared to standard headers, and provide quite good mechanical support.

[via]

IKEA Samtid mood-light upgrade - [Link]

29 Aug 2014

obr1576_1

Pulse-controlled dimmers of lighting – Finder series 15 offer an elegant solution of lighting dimming controlled by a single switch.

Possibility to control level of lighting is beneficial at least from two reasons – saving of energy and naturally – we don´t need always a full intensity of lighting. At watching of media-projector presentation, TV, illumination of corridors, … it´s often desirable only to reach only a minimum level of illumination (but not a total darkness). Light dimmers are for a long period used for these purposes, usually based on a phase regulation.

Solution from company Finder is exceptional in a fact, that it´s usable with almost every light source – for example incandescent bulbs, 230V halogen bulbs powered by a toroidal or EI transformer, dimmable CFL lamps, as well as LED bulbs. The essence of Finder 15 series dimmers versatility is in the possibility to choose a method of a phase regulation – on the beginning of the sinusoid, or on its end (leading/ trailing edge – the difference is illustrated on the attached picture). The first method is generally suitable for electronic transformers for halogen bulbs and LEDs, the second method is better for classic transformers for low voltage bulbs, for 230V CFL and for 230V LED lamps.

As it uses to be, control of such dimmers is maximally simple – by a short push of a control button (switch) the relay (output) will switch on or switch-off. By a longer holding the button presses, we can change the light intensity from minimum to maximum and vice versa. Finder 15 series dimmers also enable to work in a mode with a switched on memory (after a repeated switch on, the last used level of intensity will be set) or without a memory (after switching on, the maximum intensity will be set). An above standard benefit is a possibility to adjust a minimum light intensity by a potentiometer, what´s important mainly at electronic transformers to avoid a possible blinking at very low intensities and it´s also at classic incandescent bulbs, as their efficiency drops down rapidly at very low intensities (duty cycles).  

All 3 produced types are available directly from our stock:
15.51.8.230.0404 – assembly to installation boxes, linear dimming (also available types with dimming in 10 incremental steps)
15.81.8.230.0500 – assembly to boxes or on a panel, linear dimming
15.91.8.230.0000 – DIN rail assembly, linear dimming

Available are various versions, detailed information and a comprehensive table about possibilities of usage of particular types will give you the Finder 15 datasheet.

One impulse is able to set intensity of luminance - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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