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28 May 2014

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Dynamic Near Field Communication tag, a new wireless technology that connects phones with MCU after wifi and Bluetooth, is your optimized NFC solution.

We are proud to bring about the Dynamic Near Field Communication tag (DNFC tag), an invention that who especially tech nerds and DIY lovers have been expected for long. It greatly outstands among traditional read-only NFC tags because it’s readable and rewritable and it can communicate with various platforms, to name several most popular: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Leaf Maple stm32 and some more. It owns a high level of dexterity, thus making it efficient, easy to execute and user-friendly.

The clue is in the name: Near Field Communication. It allows NFC portable devices to establish peer-to-peer radio communications, delivering data from one to another by touching them or putting them very close together. Basically, when you get your phone (if it has NFC as a feature) close to something equipped with NFC – like a tag – it invokes an action on your device.

DNFC Tag: the Pre-Eminent NFC Tag that Interacts with MCU - [Link]

8 May 2014

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Raj @ embedded-lab.com build a programmable digital timer. He writes:

Digital timer switches are used to control the operation of electrical devices based on a programmed schedule. This project describes a programmable digital timer based on the PIC16F628A microcontroller that can be programmed to schedule the on and off operation of an electrical appliance. The appliance is controlled through a relay switch. This timer switch allows you to set both on and off time. That means, you can program when do you want to turn the device on and for how long you want it to be remained on. The maximum time interval that you can set for on and off operation is 99 hours and 59 minutes. The project provides an interactive user interface using a 16×2 character LCD along with 4 push buttons.

Programmable digital timer switch using a PIC Microcontroller - [Link]

7 May 2014

compilers_campaign_news

MikroElektronika today announced that May 6, 2014 marks the 10th anniversary since it started developing compilers for Embedded programming – mikroC, mikroPascal and mikroBasic. The company will celebrate the occasion with a month long campaign that will include exclusive content, discounts and weekly full compiler license giveaways.

The successful release of mikroPascal for PIC in 2004 spawned an extensive product line that today has 18 compilers for six popular MCU architectures (ARM, PIC, dsPIC/PIC32, 8051 and AVR) that had a significant impact on the embedded electronics industry.

MikroElektronika celebrates a decade of compiler development - [Link]

1 May 2014

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Ioannis Kedros writes:

I just finish the assembly process of my latest super mini project! It’s nothing amazing… but its a very handy sensor module!
On board there are three commonly used sensors: SHT10, BMP085 and MPU6050. I was constantly using those ones over my last projects and I thought it will be a good idea to make a simple module with all of those. They are communicating over I2C and the module can accept voltages from 3V to 6V.

Sensor Stick - [Link]


22 Apr 2014
Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Are you encountering any issues with developing a full-speed USB application on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers? This application note from NXP highlights some of the important issues that you need to be aware of for a typical full-speed USB application. [via]

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers - [Link]

18 Apr 2014

AVRISP_mkII

By ScienceProg:

Once you start building something with microcontrollers, one thing you need to take in to account is programming adapter. This is a device which allows to upload compiled code in to chip. I don’t know if this is still a fun to build your own DIY programming adapter which is not guaranteed to support all chips nor it will be safe and reliable. AVR microcontroller niche is one of most interesting when talking about programmers. If you take a look at AVRDUDE configuration file you will find that there is about 50 of them. Many of them are DIY while other are official.

Choosing right programmer for AVR microcontrollers - [Link]

11 Apr 2014

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This project turns the Arduino UNO into a computer running the BASIC programming. languagedan14 @ instructable.com writes:

Hi all, this is my first instructable documenting the creation of my project, the Arduino UNO BASIC shield which turns the Arduino UNO into a computer running the BASIC programming language.

As microcontrollers are essentially low performance computers on a chip (they have a processor, RAM and ROM) they can be used to create small computer systems. The aim of this project was to use AVR microcontrollers to create a computer capable of running the BASIC programming language.

Arduino BASIC Shield - [Link]

10 Apr 2014

hardwarehank @ instructables.com writes:

The Atmel ATTiny85 chip is an 8-pin MCU that is totally awesome. If you’ve been programming with the bigger boys (the ATMega series), these are a nice adventure – you’re rather limited in the number of output pins, but a creative design gives us a lot of flexibility in a very small package.

You’ve seen them – those “Apple computers.” Probably in the hands of some Hipster in Portland, while riding his fixie and wearing those thick framed glasses. That pulsating light when Apple laptops are asleep is so … sooooothing. You just want to go to sleep watching it. You know you do.

Today, we’re going to replicate that using our ATTiny85. It’s really easy, and most of it can be implemented in hardware instead of code (!!!).

Apple-style LED pulsing using a $1.30 MCU - [Link]

9 Apr 2014

FNZY3D2HPN4LEJ0.MEDIUMby ICStation.com:

To satisfy electronic DIY hobbyists, ICStation has developed MAX7219 Dot Matrix Module. It uses the Max7219 chip which do a great job on saving of MCU I/O. It can not only control each point individually, but also can be extended without limitation to meet your requirements on LED Sign, Team Logo and so on.

What’s more, it’s controlled by the STM8S003F3 MCU with 1K data storge space which is low cost, low power consumption, very powerful.

DIY LED Sign with MAX7219 Dot Matrix Module - [Link]

9 Apr 2014

DI5450f1

by Claude Haridge:

Microcontroller-based products sometimes require rotary switches. As many microcontrollers have an onboard ADC, it is easy to replace the rotary switch with a low cost potentiometer, when a rotary switch is too expensive or unavailable.

Although digitizing a potentiometer setting to act like a switch requires only a few instructions, an immediate problem is that instabilities in value occur at the switching threshold between one value and the next due to electrical or mechanical noise. The solution is to introduce upper and lower hysteresis thresholds about each transition so that the potentiometer needs to move beyond a threshold before another switch state is validated. For every updated switch state, another pair of thresholds replaces the previous. In this manner, the hysteresis provides clean switching between states.

Replace a rotary switch with a potentiometer - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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