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19 Dec 2014

Impressionby elektor.com:

Evaluation samples of STMicroelectronics’ STM32F446 range of MCUs are now available. These devices feature ARM Cortex-M4 based processing units with compact 256 or 512 KB on-chip Flash options and 128KB RAM with built-in memory-extension interfaces, extended connectivity and communication capabilities.

The MCUs use ST’s proprietary ART Accelerator, smart architecture, advanced Flash technology and an embedded ARM Cortex-M4 core to achieve a performance of 225 DMIPS and 608 CoreMark at 180 MHz executing from embedded Flash.

The interface capabilities allow simultaneous communication via multiple interfaces which cater for interactive industrial, scientific, medical, and Internet-of-Things (IoT) applications, while the advanced process technology, together with dynamic voltage scaling, extensive clock gating and flexible sleep modes offer significant power savings.

The STM32F446 from STMicroelectronics - [Link]

24 Nov 2014

apps3

An app note from Atmel, digital sound recorder with AVR and DataFlash (PDF!):

This application note describes how to record, store and play back sound using any AVR microcontroller with A/D converter, the AT45DB161B DataFlash memory and a few extra components.
This application note shows in detail the usage of the A/D Converter for sound recording, the Serial Peripheral Interface – SPI – for accessing the external DataFlash memory and the Pulse Width Modulation – PWM – for playback. Typical applications that would require one or more of these blocks are temperature loggers, telephone answering machines, or digital voice recorders.

[via]

Digital sound recorder with AVR and DataFlash - [Link]

28 May 2014
With a gap of just 90 nanometer on its giant magnetoresistance (GNR) read head IBM has set a new record fitting 154 terabytes on a single cartridge

With a gap of just 90 nanometer on its giant magnetoresistance (GNR) read head IBM has set a new record fitting 154 terabytes on a single cartridge

Mag tape might be old school, but its the only memory technology for Big Data that is keeping up with Moores Law: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

IBM Sets New World Record with Mag Tape - [Link]

2 May 2014

toshibastart

by phys.org:

Toshiba Corporation today announced that it has developed the world’s first 15-nanometer (nm) process technology, which will apply to 2-bit-per-cell 128-gigabit (16 gigabytes) NAND flash memories. Mass production with the new technology will start at the end of April at Fab 5 Yokkaichi Operations, Toshiba’s NAND flash fabrication facility (fab), replacing second generation 19 nm process technology, Toshiba’s previous flagship process. The second stage of Fab 5 is currently under construction, and the new technology will also be deployed there.

Toshiba starts mass production of world’s first 15nm NAND flash memories - [Link]


15 Dec 2012

More-than-Moore-memory-figure-1

Brian Bailey writes:

Moore’s Law may not be running out of steam, but it may be running out of money, as scaling to smaller geometries becomes more cost prohibitive. We also have an insatiable appetite for memory these days, but our tastes are changing from DRAM to nonvolatile memory—a market largely served by flash devices. Whereas DRAM can possibly scale down to 1 nm, we are already encountering floating-gate scaling problems for NAND flash. The answer to the scaling problem appears to be growing devices “up”; the question is how best to do it.

Three-dimensional die stacking uses a silicon interposer and TSVs (through-silicon vias) to connect the stacked dice electrically, allowing the integration of multiple, smaller dice—each processed using an optimal technology—within a package. Many memory manufacturers are already creating 3-D die-stacked chips in production quantities (Figure 1), and the technology’s use for memories paves the way for its use elsewhere.

More-than-Moore memory grows up - [Link]

4 Dec 2012

“Self-healing” NAND flash memory

Taiwan-based Macronix has found a solution for a weakness in flash memory fadeout. A limitation of flash memory is simply that eventually it cannot be used; the more cells in the memory chips are erased, the less useful to store data. The write-erase cycles degrade insulation; eventually the cell fails. “Flash wears out after being programmed and erased about 10,000 times,” said the IEEE Spectrum. Engineers at Macronix have a solution that moves flash memory over to a new life. They propose a “self-healing” NAND flash memory solution that can survive over 100 million cycles.

“Self-healing” NAND flash memory - [Link]

15 Nov 2012

Brian Bailey writes :

Flash memory has very quickly risen from being an obscure memory type to perhaps becoming the dominant memory type for many devices, including music players, cell phones, tablets and now increasingly servers and mainstream PCs. But flash memory does not scale quite as well as the more traditional DRAM that it is replacing. It is thought that DRAM can scale down to 1nm whereas we are already hitting some problems with the scaling of the floating gate in NAND flash. It is not thought that planar NAND can go below 10nm which is only a couple of processes steps away from where we are today.

3D NAND flash is coming - [Link]

15 Oct 2012

Hot off the heels of last month’s Raspberry Pi manufacturing deal with Sony, element14 today announced its continued partnership with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, launching an upgraded 512 MB version of the credit card-sized development board. Featuring double the RAM, the higher performance mini-computer is suited to multimedia, high-memory and mobile applications. The additional memory is also an enabler to allow the Raspberry Pi to run a future version of an Android 4.0 operating system.

The $35 Raspberry PI 512MB board is available now at element14 on a first come first served basis through its brands Newark element14 in North America, Farnell element14 in Europe,  and element14 in Asia Pacific, as well as through subsidiaries CPC in the UK and MCM Electronics in the US.

Members of the element14 Community are invited to join the discussion online and share ideas and plans for the Raspberry Pi on the dedicated Raspberry Pi Group, bolstering more than 7,000 new members from across the globe. Plus, make sure to check out the revolutionary board and accompanying accessories on display at electronica in Munich, Germany on November 13-16, 2012.

The full press release is included below with additional details. Please let me know if you have any questions or would like to speak with an element14 representative about the new Raspberry Pi development board and its impact on the programming revolution.

Element14 launches new Raspberry Pi Board; drives programming revolution forward  - [Link]

24 Nov 2011

If you have a micro-controller based application and you face the problem with insufficient memory space, the micro-drive uSD-G1 may be an ideal solution for you.

The micro-DRIVE uSD-G1 is an extremely compact high performance “Embedded Disk Drive” module that can be easily added to anymicro-controller design that requires a DOS-compatible file and data storage system.

Most micro-controllers have small and limited on-chip memory. For those applications that require large volumes of data, the uSD-G1 with the GOLDELOX-DOS chip is a simple solution in a form of a tiny ‘drop-in- module’. A simple serial interface is all that is required to take away the burden of low level design that would otherwise be required for the host controller. The micro-DRIVE module utilises common microSD memory cards of up to 2GB of capacity as its medium. A handful of straightforward commands provide direct access to the onboard memory card or storing and retrieving any size or type of data. Access to the card can be at (FAT based)

Don´t be limited by a memory space! - [Link]

2 Oct 2011

Researchers at Purdue University (USA) are developing a new type of computer memory that could be faster than the existing memory devices and consume far less power than flash memory. The devices combines silicon nanowires with a ferroelectric polymer, which is a material that switches polarity when an electric field is applied, to make storage cells whose polarity can be read as digital ones and zeros.

The new technology, which according to the researchers is still in a very nascent stage, is called FeTRAM for “ferroelectric transistor random access memory”. FeTRAM devices are nonvolatile, which means that data is retained in the absence of power. They could potentially use only 1% of the power of current flash memory devices, although the current version consume more power because it is not properly scaled. [via]

Radically new memory technology - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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