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30 Mar 2015

dream-1

Eco-Inspired 32-bit microcontroller chip for Wearables and the Internet-of-Things.

DREAM-1 is a Next-Generation, Eco-Inspired 32-bit microcontroller chip for Wearables and the Internet-of-Things;
No limitations – powered by Eco-Logic technology: minimal energy, maximum speed, event-driven, instantaneously responsive and energy-performance adaptive;
Fully compatible – DREAM-1 apps can be developed with existing software flows, programming languages and configured wirelessly over Bluetooth;
Exclusive – limited sampling batch only available on Kickstarter to perfect its design.

32-bit Microcontroller Chip – Next-Generation, Eco-Inspired - [Link]

24 Mar 2015

by Dooievriend @ tweakblog.tweakblogs.net:

More than a year ago, a friend of mine asked me to write the software for his 3D Spectrum Analyser (3DSA): a device that takes as input an audio signal, and outputs its visualisation on a 3D matrix of leds. If the above description doesn’t quite ring a bell, simply watch the end result in action.

First things first though, the microprocessor to be programmed was an 80MHz Olimex PIC32, soldered to the PIC32-PINGUINO-OTG development board. (For those who ever tinkered with Arduino boards: it’s the same, only with a faster chip and fewer builtin libraries ) The Algorithm had to sample the input signal at regular time intervals, convert this signal to the frequency domain, and visualize the detected frequencies on a 16x16x5 LED matrix.

3D Spectrum Analyser - [Link]

23 Mar 2015

energy

The circuit shown is a microcontroller based Energy Meter that uses MCP3905A as its main component, which is an energy-metering ICs that supplies average power information through a pulse with direct drive for mechanical counter. It includes a higher-frequency output supplying instantaneous power information for calibration while conforming the IEC 62053 International Metering Standard Specification. The energy meter provides exceptional accuracy in measuring the amount of energy consumed by an electrically powered device. It can significantly read immediate power usage, which may be used to perceive future energy consumption.

Microchip’s MCP3905A energy meter reference design is a standalone, single-phase residential meter for active energy meter design. In addition, MCP3906A can be used in the project. For calibrating the frequency output, a voltage divider calibration circuit was optimized. Each meter must be calibrated using the voltage divider circuit going into Channel 1 of the MCP3905A/06A. The MCP3905A/06A has appropriate bypass capacitors on VDD coming from the DC power supply circuitry and has its input logic pins connected to user-selectable jumpers, with the exception of the HPF pin. For this system, the HPF is turned ON with this pin connected to VDD. Moreover, the DC power supply is created from a half-wave Zener diode limited AC signal feeding a 7805 +5V regulator. The Zener diode D2 however, limits the peak voltage to 15V while the optical isolator is included in the reference design as an additional level of protection for other circuitry.

Energy meter system had been widely used to measure the energy consumption to residents, industries and businesses benefiting the power usage. It is typically calibrated in billing units such as kilowatt-hour and periodic readings of electric meters, which establishes billing cycles and energy used.

Energy Meter based on MCU - [Link]

3 Mar 2015

AD5592R-600x212

by Martin Rowe @ edn.com:

Multifunction data-acquisition systems have been around for a long time as stand-alone instruments, plug-in cards, cabled computer peripherals, and embedded in systems. Such systems are often designed with separate ADCs, DACs, and digital I/O devices. Many microcontrollers include ADCs and DACs, but that locks you into using that device. The AD5592R from Analog Devices combines all of these I/O functions, letting you use one chip to design measurement-and-control functions into systems.

A data-acquisition system on a chip - [Link]


21 Feb 2015

miniscope_v2e_pcb3

by Tomasz Ostrowski @ tomeko.net:

Extremely cheap low-speed PC/USB oscilloscope with STM32 (STM32F042) microcontroller.

Announced in January 2014 Cortex-M0 microcontroller family that features crystal-less USB FS device allows to cut noticeable part of BOM when building oscilloscope/recorder similar to miniscope v2c/v2d. STM32F042F devices are interesting in particular because of small and friendly TSSOP20 package with minimum number or power lines.

STM32F042F4 devices feature USB bootloader (DFU), single 1MSps ADC (so single channel sampling would be preferred to avoid crosstalk issues), 16 kB FLASH memory (~2 times more than needed) and 6 kB RAM.

Miniscope v2e – STM32F042 Oscilloscope - [Link]

10 Feb 2015

F5C1IYZI5THVVXT.MEDIUM

by Rusivan @ instructables.com:

In this article I will try to tell you about the gift I made for my girlfriend!

The basis of the scheme is a microcontroller Atmega8, 1K resistor, selected in such a way as not to overload the microcontroller ports. SMD resistors and diodes, size 1206.

On the reverse side of the board, there are two batteries CR2032, two capacitors, voltage regulator LM7805, and the power button with latching.

DIY SMD LED heart - [Link]

10 Feb 2015

tinybt

The Zero Tiny BLE is a small low cost and low powered embeddable board with an AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller and a Bluetooth 4.0 (Bluetooth Low Energy or BLE) radio.
AVR ATTiny85 microcontroller running at 8MHz internal clock and 3.3V. ATTiny85 Datasheet.

HM-10 Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy module. HM-10 Datasheet.
Powered by single cell 3.7V Lithium Polymer battery (LiPo) or USB B mini port.
LiPo battery recharge capabilities via the USB B mini port.
Standard UART communication over Bluetooth 4.0.
Easy prototyping via breadboard.
Use either Arduino or AVR-GCC development environments.
Small form factor of 20mm x 47mm (0.79” x 1.85”)
You can purchase a complete board at zeroengineering.io
You can order unpopulated boards from OSH Park

Zero Tiny BLE – low cost and low powered embeddable board - [Link]

10 Feb 2015

DSC04477-624x468

by Jesus Echavarria :

Hi all! With a bit of delay, here’s my last work, a PICnano breadboard based on the PIC18F2550 microcontroller. I have in mind a new project and I want to use an small board, like the Arduino Nano board. This new project is battery powered (3,7V Li-Ion battery). After checking the schematics of the Arduino Nano, I see that the microcontroler is powered at 5V. Of course, I can unmount the linear regulator (U3) that is on the board, and bypass the VIN to the microcontroller power supply. But I think it’s funny try to develop a new module when you’ve access to the microcontroller power supply! Also, I want to work with PIC microcontrollers after many years, so here’s what I design!

PICnano breadboard based on PIC18F2550 - [Link]

7 Feb 2015

The design is small scale mobile robot. The robot has two wheels that optimizes direction control and rotation. It is simple and low cost compared to other robotic designs. It is accurate and reliable with three sensors, which accuracy can still be increased with additional sensor pair.

The circuit is comprised of an Arduino Uno microcontroller, which serves as the main board of the system. It handles the complete integration of the system. The distance sensors serves as the eyes of the robot, which are three pairs for accuracy and faster obstacle sensing. The motors drives the two wheels independently, each has its own wheel to drive. The transistors that is connected to the motor are used as a switch of the motor as the microcontroller releases the signal.

This simple design of mobile robot is helpful in order to developed our own version of mobile robot. It is an efficient and helpful concept in developing a robot that can roam around especially without the need of human control. It is suitable to different applications like gathering data, search and rescue, safety measures, and other related stuffs that needs support at a very rigid situation.

Basic Mobile Robot with Autotravel Configuration - [Link]

6 Feb 2015

ee5fe36e-a105-11e4-9ca0-8aaffabbccef

Oscar Gonzalez writes:

The MicroGame is an experiment of making a custom portable platform for gamming compatible with Arduino. It’s based on a small monochrome 128×64 pixels OLED from Adafruit and a ATmega32U4 8-bits microcontroller running at 8MHz. All hardware design and game source code is writed from scratch by me and you can find all the files in my Github repository if you want to build your own. You can modify, share and make improvements as you like but do not forget to shoot me and email and show me your work!

MicroGame – Custom Arduino Compatible Gamming Platform - [Link]

 



 
 
 

 

 

 

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