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12 Mar 2012

electronicsblog.net writes:

This is a very basic Atmega328 development kit It includes:

  • Atmega 328 8 bit microcontroller with 20 MHz crystal resonator
  • PCB board with place for external components
  • Power circuit that allows powering Atmega directly(2.7-5.5 V), or through a L7805 voltage regulator(8-35 V). L7805 circuit includes a thermal fuse.
  • 10 pin ISP connection for programming.

Atmega328 Development Kit Guide - [Link]

9 Feb 2012

Pete made a nice tutorial on the fist steps of designing projects with AVR microcontrollers. He covers choosing the right uC for your project, finding datasheets, getting a programmer/debugger, and setting up the AVRStudio 5.1 for developing and debugging. [via]

In the wee hours of the night, I’ve been continuing to learn how to develop for the various AVR family chips from Atmel. I also do a lot with NETMF, Netduino, and the .NET Gadgeteer, but sometimes (despite the pain!) it feels good to code right on the metal.

Introductory/getting started information for the AVR family is not always the easiest to find, so this post covers a few other important details I think you’ll find helpful.

First steps in designing projects with AVR microcontrollers - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

We’ve seen some pretty cool projects that use blinking lights on a PC monitor to transfer data to a microcontroller. We did a little research, and here are some example projects we’ve found.

This project uses two photo transistors to read a bar code from the monitor. One handles the clock, while the other has the data. The data is read as the clock changes from black to white.

Here is the same project with a different variation of the transmission system. Instead of bar codes, two small rectangles flash to give the data and clock signals.

A more advanced setup is used by SparkFun’s bracelet kit, and the Blinky POV. Here only one flashing square is used to blink out the data, while the timing is handled onboard the uC.

You can find the blinking transfer software for the Blinky POV here, and for the bracelet kit here.

Cheap light-based PC to microcontroller communication - [Link]

21 Jan 2012

Visualizing the logistic map with a microcontroller. utku writes – [via]

The logistic map is one of the simplest nonlinear dynamical systems that clearly exhibit the route to chaos. In this paper, we explored the evolution of the logistic map using an open-source microcontroller connected to an array of light emitting diodes (LEDs). We divided the one dimensional interval [0, 1] into ten equal parts, and associated and LED to each segment. Every time an iteration took place a corresponding LED turned on indicating the value returned by the logistic map. By changing some initial conditions of the system, we observed the transition from order to chaos exhibited by the map.

Visualizing the logistic map with a microcontroller- [Link]


14 Dec 2011


dangerousprototypes.com writes:

After our recent post about the commercial semi-conductor tester we started a discussion about building a similar open source project. What came up is this AVR based transistor tester (machine translation) by Markus.

It’s built around an ATmega8 IC that interfaces with a standard HD44780 16×2 character LCD. The circuit that does the testing is simplicity itself. Three pairs of resistors are connected to 6 pins of the microcontroller, and each pair is connected on the other end to one of the transistor pins.

The theory of operation is also relatively simple. The microcontroller cycles through different patterns on its output pins until a recognizable pattern is read on its input pins. It supports a very large range of devices:

Arup and Fcobcn have already built one for themselves. Join the discussion and add your input to our development of an open source part tester.

AVR-based transitor tester - [Link]

5 Dec 2011

scienceprog.com writes:

High density line of STM32 microcontrollers have quite a bunch on features that can be used in user programs. The more features you add to source the more complicated program becomes and this way it starts to be difficult to keep up with all things. Using only main loop and interrupts becomes time consuming task to manage. If you don’t want to struggle in tuning things up manually you can use one of many real time operating systems (RTOS). They are great when you need lots of separate functions to run in parallel so no task would be missed. RTOS scheduler takes care of giving each task a decent time to perform. There are lots of great RTOS systems around. Many of them are free and opensource.

FreeRTOS on STM32 - [Link]

30 Nov 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

Last week I was browsing my old backup hard drive and I found a source code for a very simple PIC based digital timer that I made a couple of years ago. The actual hardware of the project isn’t with me anymore. I might have lost it when I moved from my old apartment into my new home. However, I thought this might be a good practice project for beginners and so I am sharing it here. I am not going to build it from scratch again; I will rather demonstrate it using my DIY PIC16F628A breadboard module and I/O board. The complete circuit diagram along with the firmware developed using mikroC Pro for PIC compiler is provided in the article.

00 to 99 minute timer using PIC16F628A microcontroller - [Link]

29 Nov 2011

Graphic solutions from 4D Systems are the proof, that a powerful graphic interface doesn´t have to mean big expenses and a long development time. So, give your applications the 4-th dimension!

Australian company 4D Systems, whose products we added into our offer, specialises in graphic solutions, which are very user-friendly and require a relatively small developing effort in order to reach very decent results.

Basis of 4D Systems graphic solutions represent two powerful chips – Goldelox and Picaso. Chips contain graphic processor, memory and interface for common LCD and OLED displays, and – depending on the type – also a support for a touch panel. Graphic chips and modules with these chips represent a powerful and user friendly platform for creation of graphic interface to a wide range of devices.
A common feature of both chips is, that they can be reconfigured into a slave graphic chip mode with a serial interface – SGC (slave graphics controller) – – for a work with the host microcontroller, or into a stand-alone graphic processor mode – GFX (stand alone host graphics controller). It is possible to change these chip features anytime by a simple reloading of free configuration file.

Goldelox – is a low cost chip supporting a powerful graphics, text, pictures, animations, macros and other. It can be used with a simple serial interface for a work with a microcontroller (SGC version) or as a stand-alone graphic processor (GFX version). It can work with many usual series „80“ LCD and OLED displays, with 8 bit interface. Chip can generate a sound, supports SD cards through SPI interface and many other. Read the rest of this entry »

24 Nov 2011

ColorNode » DigitalMisery.com – [via]

ColorNode is a wireless Arduino-compatible microcontroller board designed to replace the stock controller board on GE Color Effects light strings.

ColorNode was inspired by the original controller protocol reverse-engineering effort featured here: Hacking Christmas Lights. That work enabled simple control of each individual bulb of these light strings using just one pin on a microcontroller. The stock controller works nice and the patterns are good, however being able to have full control of the color and brightness of each bulb unlocks the potential for awesome holiday light displays. Hacking these lights is also relatively inexpensive, compared to using other addressable strings or light sequencers on the market.

ColorNode – OSHW LED string controllers - [Link]

 

23 Nov 2011

circuitvalley.com writes:

Displaying content on a normal alphanumeric display is very limited ,we have to be limited with the font size and we can’t draw any graphics also. but convention Graphics lcd are really very expensive so here is the solution, you can use Nokia 3315 monochrome LCD to display your large font text and graphics . the reason behind using this LCD is ,it is really very cheap and can be powered with 3 volts supply. so it is really good for battery powered application.

Nokia 3315 LCD interfacing with Microcontroller - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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