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13 Aug 2011

PIC microcontrollers’ Sleep feature is an extremely useful mechanism to minimize power consumption in battery-powered applications. This experimental tutorial from Embedded Lab describes how to put a PIC microcontroller into Sleep mode and then compares the PIC current consumption during Sleep mode and the normal operation mode.

Sleep and Wake PIC microcontrollers - [Link]

6 Jun 2011

A microcontroller comes with a limited number of input/output lines. If you need an additional 8-bit port in your project without replacing the microcontroller, MCO23008 might be a good choice. It is an I2C compatible port expander and provide eight bidirectional I/O lines for I2C bus. The following tutorial describes the functioning of MCP23008 and its interface with a 8-pin microcontroller like PIC12F683.

Expand the I/O capability of your microcontroller with MCP23008 – [Link]

24 May 2011

ashishrd.blogspot.com writes:

For a long time, I have been trying to find the cheapest and easiest way to control electronic devices wirelessly using a computer. It can open up a lot of possibilities. For example, you could build a radio controlled relay board, and control it from your computer. You could even control the board with a “small” computer such as an Arduino (or any microcontroller for that matter). If your Arduino has an Ethernet shield, you could use it as a Web server and control your relay board from anywhere in the world (as long as you have access to the Internet of course). There are many things that you could do without creating a mess with wires. I am mainly interested in this because I need a computer controlled wireless robot. A little background -

Computer Controlled Wireless Robot Build – [Link]

11 May 2011

The spring 2011 batch of Cornell University ECE 4760 Designing with Microcontrollers Final Projects are out. Be prepared to spend a few hours browsing through the details of these cool projects. [via]

Cornell University ECE 4760 Microcontroller Designing Final Projects – [Link]


4 May 2011

Turn off the Heater behind Me… [via]

Ed Nauman had a bad habit of leaving his workshop at night without turning off the heater. His wife would get up in the morning and find – to her consternation – the workshop was plenty toasty. In the interest of keeping peace in his household, Ed decided to create a gadget that would save the energy spent through forgetfulness. He knew he could buy an off-the-shelf solution, but as he says, “Where’s the fun in that?” Instead, Ed turned to the world of thermostats and microcontrollers.

Turn off the Heater behind Me – [Link]

8 Apr 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

It is a very simple data logger project based on PIC12F683 microcontroller. The microcontroller reads temperature values from a temperature sensor on a regular interval basis and stores them into its internal EEPROM memory. The recorded temperatures can be later transferred to a PC through serial interface. I originally published this project on electronics-lab.com last summer. I thought this could be a very good learning project for beginners, and so I am posting it here for Embedded Lab’s readers too.

A Beginner’s data logger project using PIC12F683 microcontroller – [Link]

29 Mar 2011

Microchip has announced an expansion of its 8-bit segmented LCD microcontroller (MCU) family with five new devices—the PIC16LF1902/3/4/6/7 (PIC16LF190X) MCUs. The PIC16LF190X family supports many general-purpose applications and enables the implementation of LCD into low-power and cost-sensitive designs, such as security tokens, smart cards, medical devices, home appliances, key fobs or any application involving a segmented LCD. [via]

Microchip introduces PIC16LF190X 8-bit PIC® MCUs with integrated LCD control – [Link]

28 Mar 2011

MOSFET transistors are excellent choice for driving high current devices such as motors or high power RGB LEDs. They offer very low switching resistance and very small heat dissipation compared to bipolar transistors. This guide is designed to explain how to drive P-Channel MOSFETs with a microcontroller such as PIC or ATMEGA.

Driving P-Channel MOSFETs with a Microcontroller – [Link]

18 Mar 2011

Texas Instruments has launched a floating-point microcontroller (MCU) for operation under extreme temperature conditions from -55 °C to 210 °C, which it says is an industry first and exceeds the traditional 150 °C limit for high-temperature semiconductors devices.

Floating-point MCU operates at up to 210 C - [Link]

9 Mar 2011

Riley Porter shows you how easy it is to replace a blown Atmel chip (the microcontroller heart of the Arduino) and to flash the Arduino software onto the new chip. For a few bucks and about 15 minutes of work, you can have your Arduino board back in business. [via]

Arduino – Replace and Re-Flash a Blown Microcontroller Chip – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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