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4 Jan 2013

ti-rtos_config-tools

Texas Instruments has developed a new, free real-time operating system (RTOS) based on a pre-emptive multithreading kernel, which will run on the full portfolio of TI microcontrollers, including dual core devices. TI-RTOS includes a deterministic, real-time multitasking kernel (SYS/BIOS) with a TCP/IP stack, including network applications, USB, EMAC, MMC/SD host and device stacks and class drivers, FAT-compatible file system fully integrated with C RTS file I/O functions and Ethernet, USB, UART, I²C and SD device drivers. It also supports low overhead core-to-core communication mechanism for dual-core devices. [via]

TI Launches RTOS for Microcontrollers - [Link]

4 Dec 2012

MIcrocontroller design course. ECE 4760 deals with microcontrollers as components in electronic design and embedded control. There is a large final project. See also: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEB09A7C8641987A8

Lectures: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD7F7ED1F3505D8D5&feature=plcp

Projects: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLEB09A7C8641987A8&feature=plcp

Full course materials and project documentationare available at: http://people.ece.cornell.edu/land/courses/ece4760/

Lectures from Cornell, Spring 2012 ECE4760 “designing with microcontrollers” - [Link]

23 Nov 2012

embedds.com point us to :

In many microcontroller projects you need to read and write data. It can be reading data from peripheral unit like ADC and writing values to RAM. In other case maybe you need send chunks of data using SPI. Again you need to read it from RAM and constantly write to SPI data register and so on. When you do this using processor – you loose a significant amount of processing time. In order to avoid occupying CPU most advanced microcontrollers have Direct memory Access (DMA) unit. As its name says – DMA does data transfers between memory locations without need of CPU.

Using Direct Memory Access (DMA) in STM23 projects - [Link]

31 Oct 2012

SC-CPU SolderCore Main Board is a complete development platform consisting of an Arduino form-factor microcontroller “CPU” board with a new and exciting software development environment called CoreBASIC. The SC-CPU SolderCore Main Board features a TI LM359D92 Cortex-M3 processor capable of running at clock speeds of up to 80MHz and provides a compact, flexible solution for rapid product development. SolderCore is compatible with a large range of third party plug-in PCBs to expand its capabilities.

Specifications:

  • 80MHz ARM Cortex-M3 processor
  • 512kB of flash
  • 96kB of RAM
  • 20 user-programmable I/O pins + 6 power pins; can be programmed to perform alternative functions including
    I2C, SPI, UART, PWM, CCP, ADC, QEI, and CAN
  • 10/100Mbit Ethernet port
  • Micro-AB USB On-The-Go connector
  • Spring-loaded microSD card holder
  • 2.2mm barrel jack for power supply, 6 – 9V; reverse polarity protected
  • Standard Cortex 10-pin JTAG connector
  • Two power indicator LEDs
  • Five user programmable LEDs
  • Reset button

SolderCore CPU with Interactive and Internet-enabled CoreBASIC Interpreter - [Link]


29 Oct 2012

Michael Holachek writes:

The Arduino is a great platform for rapid prototyping because it’s so easy to use, well supported, and has a huge online community. However, sometimes you might want to make a smaller, cheaper, and more minimalistic circuit that can be put into permanent projects. Or, maybe you are wondering how the Arduino works. In any case, you’ll just want the brain of the Arduino: the AVR microcontroller. This chip contains the program that runs the Arduino.

Once you have just the AVR, you might be wondering how to program it. Since you no longer have a USB connection, how do you upload code? It turns out that the Arduino can program AVR chips! Let’s get started.

Programming an AVR with Arduino - [Link]

22 Oct 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Ray reports he’s just finished working on a new open source wearable electronics controller board called SquareWear. It’s small (1.6″x1.6″) and has built-in USB port (used for programming the microcontroller, USB serial communication, and charging battery). It also has 4 on-board MOSFETs for switching high-current load (up to 500mA). The board is based on Microchip’s PIC18F14k50, and includes a SquareWear library to make it as easy to use as Arduino. Check out RaysHobby website for the source code and programming guide.

SquareWear open source controller board - [Link]

 

15 Oct 2012

The 12F series of PIC microcontrollers are handy little 8-pin devices designed for small embedded applications that do not require too many I/O resources, and where small size is advantageous. These applications include a wide range of everyday products such as hair dryers, electric toothbrushes, rice cookers, vacuum cleaners, coffee makers, and blenders. Despite their small size, the PIC12F series microcontrollers offer interesting features including wide operating voltage, internal programmable oscillator, 4 channels of 10-bit ADC, on-board EEPROM memory, on-chip voltage reference, multiple communication peripherals (UART, SPI, and I2C), PWM, and more. The following project board is designed for fast and easy development of standalone applications using PIC12F microcontrollers. It features an on-board regulated +5V power supply, header connectors to access I/O pins, an ICSP header for programming, a reset circuit, and a small prototyping area for placing additional components.

Mini project board for PIC12F series microcontrollers - [Link]

9 Oct 2012

DUE ARM-powered Arduino – [via]

Far removed from the legions of 3D printers featured at this year’s Maker Faire in New York was a much smaller, but far more impressive announcement: The ARM-powered Arduino DUE is going to be released later this month.

Instead of the 8-bit AVR microcontrollers usually found in Arduinos, the DUE is powered by an ATSAM3X8E microcontroller, itself based on the ARM Cortex-M3 platform. There are a few very neat features in the DUE, namely a USB On The Go port to allow makers and tinkerers to connect keyboards, mice, smartphones (hey, someone should port IOIO firmware to this thing), and maybe even standard desktop inkjet or laser printers.

ARM-powered Arduino - [Link]

6 Oct 2012

MIcrocontroller design course. ECE 4760 deals with microcontrollers as components in electronic design and embedded control.

ECE4760 microcontroller lectures 2012 on Youtube - [Link]

28 Sep 2012

Research laboratory Imec has announced that it has integrated an ultra-thin, flexible chip with bendable and stretchable interconnects into a package that adapts dynamically to curving and bending surfaces. The resulting circuitry can be embedded in medical and lifestyle applications where user comfort and unobtrusiveness is key, such as wearable health monitors or smart clothing.

For the demonstration, the researchers thinned a commercially available microcontroller down to 30µm, preserving the electrical performance and functionality. This die was then embedded in a slim polyimide package (40-50µm thick). Next, this ultrathin chip was integrated with stretchable electrical wiring. These were realized by patterning polyimide-supported meandering horseshoe-shaped wires, a technology developed and optimized at the lab. Last, the package is embedded in an elastomeric substrate, e.g. polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In this substrate, the conductors behave as two dimensional springs, enabling greater flexibility while preserving conductivity. [via]

Electronics that Flex and Stretch like Skin - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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