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30 Jun 2012

Compact RFID modules ID12 and ID20 can be marked by right as simple to use and reliable RFID components working with 125 kHz frequency.

Both types contain an internal antenna, thus eliminating the need of its design, production and tuning of a resonant circuit. Further, modules ID12 and ID20 contain all necessary circuitry, that´s why to produce a working RFID device, it is only necessary to connect these modules to a control unit – most often to a microcontroller. It can be said, that ID12 and ID20 represent a ready-to-use solution for a very affordable price.

If you take a look at the ID12/ID20 application circuit, you´ll find it extremely simple and also the same for both types. The main difference for both types is the range – ID12 has a 12+cm range and ID20 has 16+ cm. Corresponding to their range, has ID12 smaller dimensions and a lower power consumption than ID20.

In case, that you prefer an external antenna, you can use the ID2, module delivered with a wire-wound antenna, which only needs to be suitably placed and connected to the module. For some applications also the version of ID12 with an USB interface can be convenient – ID2-ID12USB, which can be connected directly to a PC. In case, you prefer Mifare RFID (13,56 MHz), you can use the ID20MFIA module.

Detailed information will provide you the ID2-ID20, ID12USB and ID20MFIA datasheets.

RFID all inclusive – implement RFID quickly and simply - [Link]

27 Jun 2012

The Simplecortex is a microcontroller dev board with an ARM Cortex M3 from NXP.

The Simplecortex is a microcontroller development board that is shield compatible with the Arduino. The Simplecortex has a fast microcontroller, the LPC1769 from NXP. This is a ARM Cortex M3 microcontroller with 512KB flash, 64KB RAM and it runs at 120Mhz. To make sure that the Simplecortex is easy to use we made tutorials for almost every peripheral on the chip and examples to get you started. There are tutorials for simple stuff like IO control up to more advanced tutorials for MicroSD cards. If you have ideas for a new tutorial or made a tutorial yourself, feel free to drop an email or post it in the forum. The Simplecortex also has an onboard debugger. It can also be used to program external devices like a self made PCB for your own project. No more microcontrollers with pre-programmed bootloader needed.

Simplecortex – 125MHz dev board with an ARM Cortex M3 - [Link]

27 Jun 2012

The following display features eight 7-segment displays arranged in two rows of four digits. The on-board MAX7219 driver enables you to easily add eight 7-segment LED displays to your project using only 3 I/O pins of microcontroller. The major advantage of using this board is the time-division multiplexing operations required for continuous refreshing of the display digits are performed by the MAX7219 chip, thereby keeping the microcontroller free for doing other pressing tasks. It is suitable for displaying two variable values simultaneously in a project, such as displaying temperature and humidity, or current and voltage, etc.

8-digit seven segment LED display with SPI interface – [Link]

25 Jun 2012

The Kinetis L Microcontroller board from Freescale. The board features a Cortex-M0+ ARM processor, a suspiciously familiar minty-fresh board silhouette, and headers that remind me of summers in Ivrea. From EDA360: [via]

There are two major reasons for reading this blog post:
A 32-bit microcontroller that sells for as little as $0.49 in 10K quantities and consumes 50µA/MHz
A $12.95 development board to be available late in September

These are two of the salient attributes of the Freescale Kinetis L microcontroller, previewed at Design West in San Jose back in March and now announced at the Freescale Technology Forum in San Antonia with alpha samples shipping. The target for this product is the vast sea of products and applications that currently incorporate 8- and 16-bit microcontrollers—mainly for reasons of legacy code, legacy familiarity, and cost. It will take a compelling product to hurdle these barriers and the low prices for the Kinetis L silicon and development board will help to jump those hurdles.

Freescale Announces $13 ARM Cortex-M0+ Microcontroller Board - [Link]


24 Jun 2012

Rajendra Bhatta writes:

The 12F series of PIC microcontrollers are handy little 8-pin devices designed for small embedded applications that do not require too many I/O resources, and where small size is advantageous. These applications include a wide range of everyday products such as hair dryers, electric toothbrushes, rice cookers, vacuum cleaners, coffee makers, and blenders. Despite their small size, the PIC12F series microcontrollers offer interesting features including wide operating voltage, internal programmable oscillator, 4 channels of 10-bit ADC, on-board EEPROM memory, on-chip voltage reference, multiple communication peripherals (UART, SPI, and I2C), PWM, and more. The following project board is designed for fast and easy development of standalone applications using PIC12F microcontrollers. It features on-board regulated +5V power supply, header connectors to access I/O pins, ICSP header for programming, a reset circuit, and small prototyping area for placing additional components.

PIC12F microcontroller project board - [Link]

29 May 2012

Modkit Micro is a graphical programming environment for microcontrollers.  Microcontrollers allow programmers and engineers to add behaviors to everyday objects and electronic gadgets.  We created Modkit Micro to bring the world of microcontroller programming to the masses.

Modkit Micro helps almost anyone to make almost anything smarter through a simple, yet powerful visual programming interface.  Modkit Micro is based on years of research at the MIT Media Lab including the popular Scratch project, so it will look familiar to the over 1 million kids and novice programmers who have already been introduced to Scratch.

Modkit Micro: The Easiest Way to Program Microcontrollers - [Link]

9 May 2012

The PIC24F “KL” family is Microchip’s lowest cost 16‑bit PIC® microcontroller (MCU) family. It combines the advantages of low cost, eXtreme low power and low pin count for the most cost sensitive applications. These devices feature the 16-bit performance of Microchip’s PIC24 core architecture and a cost effective peripheral set and memory mix.

These devices are designed to execute code with as little current consumption as possible. They are ideal for applications on a strict power budget, including battery powered applications. Microchip’s nanoWatt XLP technology allows the PIC24F “KL” family to achieve typical sleep currents of 30 nA at 25ºC, and typical run mode current consumption of 150 μA/MHz at 1.8V.

BUDGET µC WITH XLP – PIC24F “KL” Microcontroller Family - [Link]

9 May 2012

embedded-lab.com writes:

Seven segment LED displays are a very popular mean of displaying numerical information and finds application in front panel display boards of microwave ovens, washers and dryers, digital clocks, frequency counters, and many other gadgets. Compared to the LCD displays, the seven segment LED displays are brighter and provide a far viewing distance and a wide viewing angle. However, the downside is they are resource-hungry. It requires at least 12 I/O pins of a microcontroller to drive a standard 4-digit seven segment LED module. Consequently, their use with low pin-count microcontrollers (such as PIC12F series) is not practically feasible. Here’s a solution for that. The following 4-digit seven segment LED module features a serial interface that requires only 3 I/O pins of a microcontroller and provides full control of all digits and decimal points .

Serial four digit 7-segment LED display module - [Link]

3 May 2012

techarts writes:

They say you are only as good as your tools. This is a statement I can vouch for, as better tools can make the difference between a sleek and well designed prototype and a rats nest covered breadboard. Unfortunately as an electronic hobbyist you don’t always have the budget of a big tech company at your disposal. But hey, that’s what DIY projects are for!

Starting off as a hobbyist or even small tech company designing and building electronics you will soon learn that most of the fun IC or MCU chips are either cheaper in, or only available in, surface mount form, and fancy reflow ovens are expensive.  But a soldering oven isn’t much different from a toaster oven–  the only difference is the accuracy and temperature settings.

That is why I’m going to show you how to build your very own Soldering Reflow Oven for under $100 from an old/new standard toaster oven, thermocouple and a microcontroller.

DIY Soldering Reflow Oven - [Link]

24 Apr 2012

Solutions Cubed, LLC writes:

In a generic electronic system there are some inputs that are controlled by the end user. These inputs are read by electronics and acted upon by using outputs. The inputs can come from a myriad of sources: buttons, switches, sensors, relays, and communication devices, to name a few. In certain environments and situations, these input signals can pose a threat to the electronics reading them – especially if those electronics are designed without thought of protection. One such environment is the world of industrial electronics.

An important aspect of designs for this environment is interfacing sensitive electronics with inputs coming from the harsh conditions of a factory floor. Usually, inputs are read by some sort of intelligent processor such as a microcontroller, FPGA, or state machine. In cases like these, it is imperative to protect the processor from the inputs, while still providing a usable signal for the processor to read.

Protecting Inputs in Digital Electronics - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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