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11 Feb 2013

PIC_Breakout_Breadboard

This mini breakout board is designed to simplify prototyping and experimentation work with the popular 18-pin PIC16F series microcontrollers. It is small in size (1.95″ X 0.75″) and is breadboard friendly. It supports PIC16F84A, PIC16F628A, PIC16F88, PIC16F648A, PIC16F1827, PIC16F1847, and other 18-pin microcontrollers in the same series.

Mini breakout board for 18-pin PIC16F series microcontrollers - [Link]

26 Dec 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

Because of their compact size, ease of use and many built-in peripherals, the 18-pin PIC16F series processors (PIC16F628A, PIC16F88, and now PIC16F1827/47) have always been my favorite microcontrollers. Many of my projects and tutorials written in this blog also use PIC16F628A and PIC16F1827 microcontrollers. As I will be using them more in the future too, I thought of making some PCB versions of my breadboard module for PIC16F628A with some modifications. I used Iteadstudio’s PCB prototyping service for this, and I would say the PCBs turned out really well for the price I paid. I used their 2 layer 5cm x 5cm service and got 10 PCBs for less than $15, including shipping to the United States.

Breadboard module for 18-pin PIC16F microcontrollers - [Link]

5 Sep 2011

embedded-lab.com writes:

Matrix keypads are very common input devices in embedded systems. They have simple architecture and are easy to interface. One good thing about them is that they allow you to interface a large number of input keys to a microcontroller with minimum usage of I/O resources. This tutorial describes two different approaches of reading input data from a 4×4 (16 keys) matrix keypad interfaced to a PIC microcontroller. The pressed key information is displayed on a character LCD. The microcontroller used in this experiment is PIC16F1827.

Matrix keypad interfacing - [Link]

4 Jul 2011

The reference voltage plays a very important role in any A/D conversion. A stable reference voltage is required for accurate and repeatable A/D conversion. While this can be achieved externally by using precision voltage regulators or zener diodes, the enhanced mid-range 8-bit PIC microcontrollers facilitate this feature internally through the FVR module, thus avoiding the use of any external components. Embedded Lab just posted a new experimental tutorial on how to use the FVR module inside the PIC16F1827 microcontroller to provide an accurate and stable reference voltage for A/D conversion.

Enhanced mid-range PIC microcontrollers provide internally generated fixed voltage references for A/D conversion – [Link]


30 Aug 2010

The system is contructed of 16 custom built PCBs, each containing a PIC16F1827 microcontroller which receives data via I2C from a master board and controls 3 MAX6964 LED Drivers via I2C – one each for red, green and blue components. Each board then runs two ribbon cables of 8 RGB LEDs. The master board is running on a PIC18F26J50, a very powerful little PIC with an awful lot of I/O capability. Its reading the animations from an SD Card formatted with FAT32 using an SPI interface, it then chunks this data up, and sends it via the main I2C bus to the slave boards. [via]

Illuminatrix LED Project – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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