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2 Jul 2014

IMG_00861

Diogoc shared his Hakko T12 soldering controller in the project log forum:

I finally finished my Hakko T12 soldering controller.
Thanks to sparkybg and arhi for all help and sugestions.
Some features of the controller:
- 3310 graphic display
- rotary encoder for easy and fast temperature selection
- sleep mode when the iron is in the stand
- turn off when a long time in sleep mode
- audible indications
- intuitive menu navegation
- percentage visualization of output power
- powered by a compact and lightweight 24V dc laptop power supply
- ambient temperature sensor for a better cold junction compensation
- lcd backlight control
- alarm for very high temperature, turning off immediately the heater
- indication of tip removed to allow hot swapping the tips
- bootloader for easy firmware upgrade via integrated usb port
- usb port and c# software to monitoring all parameters and help to adjust the pid parameters

The controller still need a little adjust in the PID parameters but for me it is almost perfect.

Hakko T12 soldering controller - [Link]

18 Jun 2014

CycleWithOverflow

0xPIT @ github.com writes:

This Reflow Oven Controller relies on an Arduino Pro Micro, which is similar to the Leonardo and easily obtainable on eb*y for less than $10, plus my custom shield, which is actually more like a motherboard.

As I believe it is not wise to have a mess of wiring and tiny breakout-boards for operating mains powered equipment, I’ve decided to design custom board with easily obtainable components.

The hardware can be found in the folder hardware, including the Eagle schematics and PCB layout files. It should fit the freemium version of Eagle

Reflow Oven Controller with graphics TFT - [Link]

21 May 2014

DSC_0072-Finished_web-600x362

Carlazar posted pictures of his simple soldering iron driver (SSID) with Arduino PID control. [via]

Main features are:
- Any thermocouple type irons.
- Additional control mode: On-Off controller (besides PID PWM).
- External power supply: Some standard Notebook power supply DC 19V, 4.74A.
- Small dimensions: It fits into 90mm x 110mm x 45mm (WxDxH) box.
- Easy to assemble.
- Simple design: only a few components (besides Arduino).
The HQ soldering iron HQ20/HQ30 (24V, 48W) was used. It has the E-type thermocouple built in (68uV/degC) but you can change that value in software according to the soldering iron that is used (for example K-type is 41uV/degC).

Simple soldering iron driver (SSID) with Arduino PID control - [Link]

27 Jan 2014

stripboard-pid-resized

Tom posted his Arduino PID controller shield in the dangerous prototypes project log forum:

Program a temperature profile to mash beer or reflow solder. Here’s how.

This full featured open source PID controller uses a DIY stripboard shield for Arduino Uno and compatible boards. Firmware based on osPID massively revamped and extended, blood was sweated over new auto tune routines. Standalone or remote operation over UART using Java GUI. All documented on Github with BOM, schematics, code, pictures etc. Parts cost about $15, external SSR module and Arduino required.

I spun this project as a kit for Tayda, with the idea that all the components could be cheaply ordered in one place.

Open source PID controller (DIY Arduino shield) - [Link]


3 Aug 2012

Controlling temperature has been a prime objective in various applications including refrigerators, air conditioners, air coolers, heaters, industrial temperature conditioning and so on. Temperature controllers vary in their complexities and algorithms. Some of these use simple control techniques like simple on-off control while others use complex Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) or fuzzy logic algorithms. In this project Shawon Shahryiar discusses about a simple control algorithm and utilize it intelligently unlike analogue controllers. Here are the features of this controller:

  • Audio-visual setup for setting temperature limits.
  • Fault detection and evasive action.
  • Temperature monitoring and display.
  • Audio-visual warning.
  • System status.
  • Settable time frame.
  • Data retention with internal EEPROM memory.

Intelligent temperature monitoring and control system using AVR microcontroller - [Link]

23 Apr 2012

Hercules Trapierakis writes:

This is a copy paste tool of George’s Homemade Soldering Station  but with some improvements and not with a PIC but with an AVR ATMEGA8 uC. I have changed the way that the information is displayed also you can adjust the P I D values  and it has a safe mode option – that it will turn off the soldering iron if it is not used for a certain amount of time.

Here is an implementation of Pantelis

Homemade Soldering Station - [Link]

3 Feb 2012

PID is implemented when a precise way is needed to drive an external device that provides feedback. Heaters with temperature sensors, and servo motors are examples where PID is used.

This app note by Microchip gives instructions how to implement PID control in PIC18 projects. Basic terms are explained inside the document as well as algorithm flow charts to understand how PID is implemented. Microchip has also provided assembler source code to go with this app note. [via]

App note: Implementing PID on PIC18 microcontrollers - [Link]

23 Jan 2012

Giorgos Lazaridis writes:

If you have work with some kind of industrial or marine automation, then most probably you’ve heard before the term PID. PID controllers are very common in closed-loop systems today. Here is how this system can calculate and minimize the error with great precision. 

The whole story began as a marine application, when people were trying to find ways to make reliable and accurate ship steering systems. But the problem was that, if the automation turns the rudder let’s say left, the ship will not turn instantaneously, instead it needs a long course, for ships do not steer like like cars, instead they have a big hysteresis. Another problem is also that when the ship finally turns to the right direction and the automation turns the rudder straight, the ship keeps turning left due to inertia and many other parameters like waves, wind, speed etc.

At first, proportional systems were developed to do this. A proportional systems reads the feedback (electronic compass) and turns the rudder according to the angle that the ship needs to turn. If for example the ship had to turn 45 degrees left, the rudder would turn 20 degrees, and as the ship slowly turns to this direction, the rudder decreases its angle proportionally. But this system has a great disadvantage: Either the rudder will oscillate left and right because the ship will never stay on course precisely due to external disturbances, or the system will stabilize with a small constant error in angle.

PID Theory - [Link]

22 Jan 2012

ospid.com writes:

We’ve been working hard over the last several months to build a fully-featured, open source PID controller that’s every bit as capable as its closed brethren.

There’s a bunch of information on this site regarding technical details, purchasing information, and even a quick PID primer.  Take a look around, and let us know what you think!

(If you’re so inclined, there’s also a post on my personal blog with some introductory videos)

osPID – Open Source PID Controller - [Link]

 

27 Sep 2011

Line follower simulator. [via]

A model of differential driven wheeled robot is implemented. The width of the line sensor, the line sensor position and the wheel gauge (distance between the two wheels) can be adjusted.

Apart from the geometry settings, there is also a possibility to adjust the motor behavior. The “acceleration” scrollbar sets how quickly the robot chassis reacts to commands form the PID regulator.

Line follower simulator - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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