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7 Dec 2013

DIYpowerSupply

abhishek7xavier @ instructables.com writes:

Power supply is an utmost essential tool for an electronic lab. It comes in handy for powering up various applications and circuits. However a fixed voltage, fixed current power supply is sufficient for basic needs but a variable one is good to have because different circuits and components operate at different voltages and consumes different current. When it comes to an electronic hobbyist’s lab, a good power supply is must to have. Also if the power supply boosts additional features like on board voltage and current display, it comes in handy as one can know the exact voltage at the output terminals and also the current drawn by the load. But in the electronic market, those power supplies are not economic are meant for industrial purpose . Here in this article I present an economical and cost effective yet efficient variable bench power supply that is capable of providing 1.2 to 25 Volt variable supply up to 5 Ampere through one channel while 5 Volt, 1 Ampere and 12 Volt, 1 Ampere supply through other two channels thus having one variable and two fixed supply channels.

[via]

DIY Variable DC Power Supply with Display and PC interface - [Link]

28 Oct 2013

ElectronicLoad200W-600x450

Kerry Wong built a DIY constant current/constant power electronic load. It can sink more than 200W of power:

A while back I built a simple constant current electronic load using an aluminum HDD cooler case as the heatsink. While it was sufficient for a few amps’ load under low voltages, it could not handle load much higher than a few dozen watts at least not for a prolonged period of time. So this time around, I decided to build a much beefier electronic load so it could be used in more demanding situations.
One of the features a lot of commercial electronic loads has in common is the ability to sink constant power. Constant power would come in handy when measuring battery capacities (Wh) or testing power supplies for instance. To accommodate this, I decided to use an Arduino (ATmega328p) microcontroller.

[via]

Building a constant current/constant power electronic load - [Link]

12 Sep 2013

ossia-cota-technology

Wireless power. It’s less sci-fi sounding than it once was, thanks to induction charging like that based on the Qi standard, but that’s still a tech that essentially requires contact, if not incredibly close proximity. Magnetic resonance is another means to achieve wireless power, and perfect for much higher-demand applications, like charging cars. But there’s been very little work done in terms of building a solution that can power your everyday devices in a way that doesn’t require thought or changing the way we use our devices dramatically.

Cota By Ossia Aims To Drive A Wireless Power Revolution And Change How We Think About Charging - [Link]

17 Jul 2013

pro_vs_first_protox600

Steve Taranovich writes:

This is a first in a series of stories called “EEvolution of an idea” showing how a good idea got its start and evolved into a viable product in the electronics industry. I would ask our faithful EDN readers to comment on this series idea and if there is a good positive response which views this as something useful and educational to our readers, then I would like to continue with more interesting and innovative stories like this.

I was recently alerted to an innovative new product called the PortPilot in a comment to an article on EDN.

PortPilot Pro is an inline USB power analyzer, designed by J. Loren Passmore. Passmore describes himself as “an entrepreneur who consults with companies in a variety of industries to envision innovative products and speed their path to market.

Innovative inline USB power analyzer - [Link]


26 Apr 2013

article-2013april-generating-high-dc-output-fig2

by Ashok Bindra:

Whether for driving white LED backlights or powering RF and analog circuits, laptops, tablets and other mobile devices often require voltages that are much higher than the input supply voltage. Consequently, step-up or boost DC/DC converters generate output voltages that are several times the input to serve a variety of circuits and functions in these systems. For instance, in battery powered systems, the input normally is 5 V and below, while voltages as high as 15 and 24 V or more are needed to power RF/analog functions or drive thin-film transistor (TFT) liquid crystal displays (LCDs). Similarly, high voltages also are needed to bias avalanche photodiodes (APDs) found in optical receivers.

Generating High DC Output Voltage from Low Input Supply - [Link]

24 Apr 2013

TI_PMG

TI’s latest Power Management devices, design tools and support resources in the new 2013 Power Management Guide

TI’s Power Management Guide 2013 edition - [Link]

19 Feb 2013

This is a great video of Alan Wolke talking about op-amp power supply options. He explains the differences when using op-amps on a single supply, a split (or bipolar) supply and virtual ground.

This video discusses the power supply considerations for op amps. It talks about split or dual power supply and single supply operation, and why the op amp often doesn’t care which you use! It shows how traditional op amps designed for split supply operation can be used in single supply applications. The most important consideration generally is taking care of where the input and output voltages are with respect to the supply rails. The input voltage and output voltage range specifications are examined in a datasheet. The operation of a op amp in a single supply application is examined on an oscilloscope. This operation is compared to a modern rail-to-rail op amp in the same circuit.

Op Amp Power Supplies: Split, Single, and Virtual Ground Designs - [Link]

3 Dec 2012

The INA230 is a current-shunt and power monitor with an I2C interface that features 16 programmable addresses. The INA230 monitors both shunt voltage drops and bus supply voltage. Programmable calibration value, conversion times, and averaging, combined with an internal multiplier, enable direct readouts of current in amperes and power in watts.

Resources: Datasheet

INA230 – Precision digital/current/voltage/power monitor - [Link]

5 Nov 2012

The LTC2945 is a rail-to-rail system monitor that measures current, voltage, and power. It features an operating range of 2.7V to 80V and includes a shunt regulator for supplies above 80V to allow flexibility in the selection of input supply. The current measurement range of 0V to 80V is independent of the input supply. An onboard 0.75% accurate 12-bit ADC measures load current, input voltage and an auxiliary external voltage. A 24-bit power value is generated by digitally multiplying the measured 12-bit load current and input voltage data.

LTC2945 – Wide Range I2C Power Monitor - [Link]

30 Oct 2012

Carolyn Mathas writes:

The LT3763 by Linear Technology is a synchronous buck LED driver controller that delivers more than 300W of LED power. With an input voltage range of 6V to 60V, it targets such applications as automotive, industrial and architectural lighting. Output voltage from 0V to 55V enables it to driver LEDs in a single string. The driver features input and output current monitors and limiting and accurate input and output voltage regulation.

Buck LED driver delivers 300W of power - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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