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2 Nov 2011

How-To: Variable DC Power Supply @ MAKE – [via]

Hobbyist electronics projects need robust, reliable power supplies for prototyping and testing. I learned how to build this circuit from the Basic Analog Circuits class at ITP taught by Eric Rosenthal, but took it several steps further in building a solid enclosure and integrating a voltage meter. Now it lives on my desk, ready to power most small projects I’m working on, ranging from 0 – 24 volts and up to two amps. You can learn all about how to make one yourself using this Make: Projects tutorial.

The mini volt meter from Adafruit is what brought this project to the next level. All of the components on this three-digit, seven-segment display are packaged into a small size. All you need to do to integrate it into any project is attach a positive and negative lead to whatever you wish to measure.

Make a variable DC power supply - [Link]

13 Oct 2011


Aktakom offers essential laboratory package complete with oscilloscope, signal generator, power supply and 6 in 1 digital multimeter.  

       Miami Fl., October 11, 2011, 2011 – T&M Atlantic, distributor of the test and measurement equipment today announced a package deal that combines all the basic equipment necessary for assembling a new electronics laboratory. The laboratory package includes: Aktakom ADS-2061M (60MHz; 500MS/s; 2ch) Digital Storage Oscilloscope, Aktakom AWG-4105 (5MHz; 125 MS/s; Wave length: 16 K pts.; 2ch) Function / Arbitrary Waveform Generator, Aktakom APS-3205 ( 30V:5A; 2ch) Power Supply and    Aktakom AMM-1062 6 in 1 Professional Digital Multimeter with Environment Measurements (Light Meter, Sound Meter, Humidity Meter, Temperature Meter & Non-contact AC voltage detector). This laboratory package is not just functional and economical it is also portable and with optional VGA output for an oscilloscope could be used for presentations, demonstrations and brainstorm sessions.

        First introduced at the NCSL International Show in Washington DC, ADS Oscilloscopes and AWG Generators attracted interest from many leading laboratories including: MIT, John Hopkins University, UMASS, UPENN and UCA Berkley.

More information is available at www.tmatlantic.com

Introductory Prices start from $999.00 Plus Free Shipping and Free Oscilloscope Carry Bag

Aktakom electronics laboratory under $1000 - [Link]  

31 Aug 2011

This is a a regulated power power supply that is sized to plug right into the power bus strips of common solderless breadboards.

The board is assembled except for the headers which you must provide separately and solder in place.

Breadboard Power Supply Stick 5V/3.3V - [Link]

29 May 2011

www.microsyl.com writes:

This project is like the one that all of you must have done in electronics. I took the idea from Circuit Cellar. The original power supply provides an output of 2.5-15V at 500mA. This circuit will provide 0-25V at 0 to 5A. You will see there is a lot of modification to achieve this.

Bench Power Supply 0-25v @ 0-5amp – [Link]


16 May 2011

Lewis02 writes:

Hello there. You’ve probably found this Instructable to gather ideas about making a portable solar power supply yourself. I’ve always been interested in electronics with this project being my latest idea to come wandering out of my head, why not make a portable box on wheels, that I can plug basically anything into, thats powered by the sun? So therefore I thought I’d share this Instructable with the rest of the world.

Portable Solar Power Supply – [Link]

16 May 2011

JeriEllsworth writes:

As I promised in my video “EL Wire Made at Home” .www.youtube.com/watch?v=AcXHx5ikjM4 I came up with a few circuits for building your own power supply for electroluminescent wire. The first one is very similar to the “tickler” style 1908 Ford Model T spark coil http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ignition_system#Switchable_systems

Build your own EL wire power supply – [Link]

12 May 2011

blog.makezine.com writes:

Don’t let the sexy name fool you, the Extech 382213 is all business — the business of powering your awesome hacking projects!

The 382213 plays the desktop power supply role — it gives you carefully measured voltages to play with when working on a project, reducing the number of batteries you might waste, as well as preventing you from ‘letting the smoke out’ by blasting your components with too much juice. The 382213 is about 6×9 inches and weights 11 pounds.

Extech 382213 Desktop Power Supply Review – [Link]

14 Apr 2011

A LM1117 based power supply.

Auxiliary power supply – [Link]

 

14 Apr 2011

stephenhobley.com writes:

If you use opamps like the TL082/84 you’ll be in need of a “split” power supply. That is a power supply that has a positive voltage, ground, and the equivalent negative voltage (eg +5v, 0v, -5v). Since most audio signals are AC you need the opamp to operate in this range to be able to process them.

Creating a negative voltage from a positive one - [Link]

12 Apr 2011

newtonn2 writes:

This instructable will show you how to make a very good bench power supply using mainly recycled parts. This is the really the “mark II”, you can see “mark I” here.

Make a bench power supply mostly from recycled parts – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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