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28 Jul 2013

FCDFCNGGSILY4BV.LARGE

This is an instructable for making your own PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) flyback driver!

Simple PWM Flyback driver tutorial - [Link]

10 Jul 2013

SCR80

jeelabs.org writes:

The Arduino library has always had an “analogWrite()” function, even though the ATmega doesn’t have any way to generate a varying voltage. So why the name?

Well, what most microcontrollers can do is generate a pulse-width modulated signal, also known as PWM. That’s just a fancy way of saying that the microcontroller periodically generates a pulse, of which the width can be varied under software control.

From PWM to voltage - [Link]

7 Jul 2013

FWWT4XWHINOEEZY.LARGE_-600x326

TechBitar wrote this Instructable detailing his ANDRUINO, the 2-way Android controller for Arduino via bluetooth:

ANDRUINO is a simple tool to help you control your Arduino (or clone) from your Android phone. It’s both an Android app and an Arduino program. Andruino has a simple Android user interface to 1) control Arduino’s digital and PWM pins 2) send text commands to Arduino 3) and receive data from Arduino over Bluetooth using the ever popular HC-05 Bluetooth over serial module or its siblings.

Andruino should work with other Bluetooth modules with some tweaking but I have only tested it with the HC-05. This is an alpha version that’s running fine on my Samsung Galaxy S2 Plus. Please share your experience running Andruino on your phone.

[via]

Andruino: A simple 2-way bluetooth-based Android controller for Arduino - [Link]

16 Jun 2013

Peweem-600x449

here’s another project by Mats the Peweem:

… Peweem – a small unit for to be put on a solderless breadboard to generate 0-100% PWM signals at various frequencies, it can also measure the duty cycle of incoming signals.

Peweem – generating 0-100% PWM signals at various frequencies - [Link]


6 May 2013

AZIZ-LED-Microscope-Illuminator-Project-W600

Here’s an interesting project by Steve of Tangent Audio the AZIZ project, a microcontroller-based LED microscope illuminator:

AZIZ is an LED microscope illuminator that I designed and built from scratch. It is designed around a Texas Instruments TLC59116 constant-current PWM LED driver chip, and an Atmel ATTiny1634 8-bit microcontroller.

[via]

AZIZ: DIY LED microscope illuminator - [Link]

24 Apr 2013

article-2013april-buck-boost-converters-fig2

Publitek European Editors writes:

Many security and motion detector systems rely on small, semi-autonomous nodes that are easy and simple to install. This implies the use of a battery-based power source and low-power operation in order to minimize the number of battery changes during the lifetime of the product.

Over its lifetime, the output voltage of a battery falls, with the biggest decline when the charge is nearing full depletion. A converter type that can accommodate this change in voltage but can still provide relatively high voltages for sensors and RF transmitters is the buck-boost converter – it operates the buck part of the circuit when the battery is fresh, moving to boost operation when the voltage falls below the threshold of the electronic circuitry it powers. A number of vendors have developed integrated buck-boost converters optimized for battery systems

Buck-Boost Converters Help Extend Battery Life for Motion Detection - [Link]

28 Feb 2013

IMG_20120729_1801342

Zak Kemble build an AVR based PWM fan controller. He writes:

So this is a bit of a continuation on my 555 timer based PWM controllers, but now using microcontrollers and MOSFETs instead of 555 ICs and transistors. I made 2 versions, one with switches for speeding up and down and the other with a potentiometer like the previous controllers. I used ATtiny25 controllers running at 31.25KHz (8MHz internal RC / 256 prescaler) with a 3.3V supply, the MOSFETs I used are STP36NF06L with 0.045Rds and 2.5Vgs max, perfect for 3.3V, the MOSFETs only generate ~180mW of heat at 2A ((0.045Rds * (2A * 2)) = 0.18W) so no heatsink needed, you can barely feel them getting warm.

AVR microcontroller based PWM fan controller - [Link]

8 Feb 2013

MBI5030-SOP24_starter-board__front_purple-640x473

Macroblock MBI5030, 16-ch constant current LED driver with PWM, SPI-like interface, requires external e clock.

The problem: you need the chip to figure out if your code actually works. And you also need the LEDs to see what’s going on – if at all. You could use a logic analyzer, but that is overkill. Just looking at the LEDs is a much more suitable way. Your code might have insidious bugs, or the datasheet might simply be crap / outdated / obsolete – of course without your knowledge. BUT you surely don’t want to fight wires, at least not during the coding / debugging phase. All you need is the chip + onboard LEDs as indicators.

MBI5030 – 16ch LED constant current LED driver starter board - [Link]

15 Dec 2012

DSC00050

This is a nice switchmode power supply with the following characteristics:

• Input Voltage 80-275 VAC
• Operating frequency. 47 -63 Hz 47 -63 Hz
• Maximum output power 320W
• Frequency of operation 130 KHz
• Adjustable Output Voltage 0 – 40V
• Output current adjustable from 0 – 20A at 15V
• Over temperature protection with indicator
• Automatic fan control with indicator
• 0-40V voltmeter and ammeter 0-40A LCD programmable USB
• Ammeter without resistive elements with Hall sensor 50A

- PWM module for this PSU

Switchmode Laboratory Power Supply - [Link]

9 Nov 2012

The TPS92510 by Texas Instruments is a 1.5-A constant current DC/DC buck converter with a combo of frequency synchronization, pulse-width modulation (PWM) dimming and thermal foldback firsts. Used with the WEBENCH LED Architect, users rapidly design a power management circuit to drive a string of up to 17 high-brightness LEDs at up to 97% power efficiency in automotive, industrial, and general lighting applications.

The TPS92510 operates with fixed frequency by using its internally generated clock or via synchronization to an external PWM clock source. Thermal foldback ensures light output remains even in an LED over-temperature condition, adding safety.  [via]

Features include:

  • 3.5-V to 60-V input voltage operating range supports a wide variety of DC LED lighting applications, including area and street lighting.
  • Fixed switching frequency range from 100 kHz to 2.5 MHz can be synchronized to optimize for efficiency or solution size.
  • LED thermal foldback with external negative temperature coefficient (NTC) protects LED array from over-temperature while maintaining reduced light output.
  • Dedicated PWM dimming input from 100 Hz to 1 kHz adjusts LED brightness without color shift or perceivable flicker.

Buck converter drives high-brightness LEDs - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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