Home Blog  





21 Oct 2014

regency_transistor_radio

by Suzanne Deffree @ edn.com:

Texas Instruments announced plans for the Regency TR-1, the first transistor radio to be commercially sold, on October 18, 1954.

The move was a major one in tech history that would help propel transistors into mainstream use and also give new definition to portable electronics.

TI was producing germanium transistors at the time, but the market had been slow to respond, comfortable with vacuum tubes.

However, the use of transistors instead of vacuum tubes as the amplifier elements meant that the device was much smaller, required less power to operate, and was more shock-resistant. Transistor use also allowed “instant-on” operation because there were no filaments to heat up.

TI announces 1st transistor radio, October 18, 1954 - [Link]

13 Oct 2014

webradio_pic2

Arduino WebRadio player is an inexpensive WebRadio player that can plays internet audio streams up to 64-kbps and is based on mp3, aac and wma audio formats.

The main components are:

  • Arduino Pro mini board
  • ENC28J60 ethernet module
  • VS1053B mp3, aac, wma decoder
  • 84×48 dot matrix LCD module (Nokia 5110)

Arduino WebRadio player - [Link]

6 Oct 2014

rasrad-arm

RaspWristRadio – Wearable Personal FM Radio Station - [Link]

10 Sep 2014

Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-sized radios.

A Stanford engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant, a device so energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.

Designed to compute, execute and relay commands, this tiny wireless chip costs pennies to fabricate – making it cheap enough to become the missing link between the Internet as we know it and the linked-together smart gadgets envisioned in the “Internet of Things.”

Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-sized radios - [Link]


7 Nov 2013

WK1600_DSC_0005_video

Raffael @ code-bude.net build a webradio by himself. It’s made from an Arduino, an hacked TP-Link WR703N router and some interface parts.

Today I want to present you one of my larger craft projects. This time it is not just about software, but also about the associated hardware. What is it? A web radio!

I like to listen to internet radio stations, but I didn’t want to run my pc only for listening to webradios. Connecting my phone to my stereo either wasn’t a solution, since I’d rather wear this with me, because I don’t want to run for each SMS / Whatsapp message to the music system. And because I always like to tinker, it was obvious to build a web radio as a standalone device myself.

RadioduinoWRT – a do it yourself webradio - [Link]

31 Jul 2013

radio

Making an FM using TEA5767 module:

I’ve started to build a little FM radio with one of this cheap modules with a Phillip chip, the TEA5767. I will control it with a MSP430, probably I’ll use some kind of encoder to change stations and a potentiometer for the volume.

The TEA5767 is a single-chip electronically tuned FM stereo radio for low-voltage applications with fully integrated Intermediate Frequency (IF) selectivity and demodulation. Most of the information of this devices is from the datasheet and this app note.

Making an FM radio-Part 1; the TEA5767 - [Link]

7 Sep 2012

The wireless modem you’ve been waiting for. Works with Arduino & other micros. Open source mesh networking base. FCC Certified. Cheap. Eric Gnoske writes:

So who’s behind RadioBlocks? A group of engineers who have worked on many aspects of low-power radio devices. A group of engineers who time & time again saw customers coming to us with similar requests, but with no way for us to easily fill them. So we created RadioBlocks to allow people to easily drop a radio link into their project, hence “RadioBlocks” – A simple to use radio building block.

Sure there are lots of radio boards out there. Most have two modes: super-simple serial-port replacement mode, and complex full network mode. Neither of those are useful – most people want to send some data between some devices. They need more than serial-port replacement, but the full network mode is too much hassle. Then many of those radio devices are just too expensive – are you really going to drop $30 or $40 on a single radio node, then buy extra hardware so you can attach sensors? Good luck with that!

RadioBlock: Simple Radio for Arduino or any Embedded System - [Link]

14 Mar 2012

 

The excellent book on transmitters that offer contains 467 pages of information in English about transmitters. Radio Transmitters was published in 1961 by engineers at the laboratory of ITT radio transmission.

Here’s a whole book dedicated to transmitters! Targeted at professional engineers rather than hams, this covers it all from oscillators through power amps, modulators, power supplies, and antenna matching.

Radio Transmitters – Tube power RF Circuits - [Link]

4 Sep 2011

Radio Arduino – uses Adafruit WaveShield!… [via]

What it is really doing is playing 24 music tracks that I preloaded onto an SD card in WAV format. There are also 10 tuning noises tracks that get played when the tuner is turned.

Because this is the first time I did this I had a lot of help. Firstly the chaps and chapesses at Hackspace have been very supportive in teaching me how to use and Arduino, particularly Adrian McEwan and Oomlout. Also Jingle Joe who supervised my soldering of the Wave Shield, Brox who helped me decipher the ancient mysteries of FAT16 and Esme who helped dismantle the original radio… PS I did do some of it myself!

Radio Arduino – uses Adafruit WaveShield! - [Link]

 

22 Aug 2011

Free license study guides

Dan KB6NU writes:

Currently, I offer study guides for the first two license classes, the Technician Class and the General Class, and I’ll be publishing a study guide for the Extra Class license next year.

I call them “no nonsense” license study guides because all I cover are the questions that might appear on the test. The philosophy behind this is that the quicker someone gets a license, the sooner they’ll really be able to learn about the hobby, whether that’s electronics or antennas or propagation or whatever.

The study guides are available in three different formats:

  1. FREE! There’s a free PDF download available from my website.
  2. E-book. There are Kindle and Nook e-book versions available from the Amazon and Barnes&Noble websites. The cost for the e-book version is $7.99.
  3. Print. Yes, a dead tree version is available if you really want one. These cost $12, shipped, and are also available from my website.

Amateur Radio No-Nonsense Study Guides - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits