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30 Aug 2013

comp

Boris Landoni present us an overview of todays microcomputer boards able to run Linux. He writes:

Today we present an overview of today’s market offering regarding ARM RISC microcomputer able to run a GNU/Linux distribution. And once again, this is just the beginning.While the growth of such a device segment was predictable, it wasn’t easy to predict such an explosion. In fact we now have an heterogeneous set of options, with different characteristics, requiring a different approaches to for the optimization of the GNU / Linux operating system. In this post we’ll try to present, on the one hand, the unifying elements of different devices and, secondly, to classify each device based on its best use cases.Let’s begin to point out a first list of devices to analyze, new ones appear every day but we’ll deal with them later.The ones we feature on this post are the following:

  • RaspberryPi
  • PcDuino
  • BeagleboneBlack
  • CubieBoard
  • MK802III
  • MK802IIIS
  • ODROID-U2

A Comprehensive Comparison of Linux Development Boards - [Link]

12 Dec 2011

Veronica @ blondihacks, we are loving her site! – [via]

Now for something a little different. I was first exposed to computers back in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Suffice it to say, placing my hands on the keyboard of an Apple //+ was a watershed moment which pretty much set the course of my life from that point on. The heart of the Apple // was the 6502 microprocessor. I learned to program on that chip, along with millions of other people. It was the chip that brought computers and video games to hundreds of millions of homes and schools, and I think it’s safe to say that it sparked a revolution. The world was ready for personal computers, but all the contemporary CPU offerings (notably from Intel, AMD, and TI) were very expensive. The 6502 offered all the power of the others, for 1/10th of the price. You could find 6502s in the entire Apple // line (except the GS), the Commodore 64, the Vic-20, the Atari computers (except the ST), the BBC Micro & Acorn, the Atari 2600, the Nintendo Entertainment System, and many others. If you used a personal computer or played a videogame in the 1970s, 1980s, or early 1990s, there’s a very good chance it had a 6502 in it. It was arguably the first RISC chip, and the first to do pipelining. It has a clean, elegant instruction set and gets much more done with a clock cycle than anything else of the era.

Veronica @ blondihacks - [Link]

5 Nov 2011

If you like the AVR ATmega microprocessors, then the AVR XMEGA offer you even more reasons why to use them in your appliances.

Single-chip microprocessors AVR ATmega have gained a huge popularity all over the world. Because an excellent can also be even better, Atmel Corporation came to the market with the innovated series of these processors under marking XMEGA.

Generally known excellent properties of 8 bit RISC processors AVR Atmega, were further improved by developers in Atmel Corporation in this new line of 8/16 bit AVR XMEGA processors. That they succeeded, testifies this concise overview of innovations:

  • fast precise 12 bit AD converter (ADC)
  • fast 12 bit DA converter (DAC)
  • DMA controller for CPU independent data transfer
  • event system, most of peripherials and the DMA controller can use it, what significantly offloads CPU
  • ultra low power consumption – picoPOWER technology for a minimal consumption of 100nA in the Power down mode
  • EBI bus for RAM extension, peripherials (LCD) or memory-mapped devices
  • free Qtouch library for operation with capacitive touch panels
  • full speed USB connectivity without external crystal (at some models)
  • free AVR Software Framework including all common USB device classes
  • LCD display driver for a direct connection of LCD to processor
  • true 1.6V operation and speeds up to 32 MHz
  • AES, DES crypting protocols
  • 3-level interrupt controller (priority is freely user definable)
  • CRC modul (cyclic redundancy check) for data integrity check
  • RTC (real time clock) with optional battery backup system
  • analog comparators with adjustable hysteresis and propagation delay
  • external oscillator failure detection – in case of failure, CPU will start operation with the internal 2MHz oscillator
  • supply voltage 1.6 to 3.6V

Atmel AVR XMEGA will provide you eXtra more - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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