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1 May 2014

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Ioannis Kedros writes:

I just finish the assembly process of my latest super mini project! It’s nothing amazing… but its a very handy sensor module!
On board there are three commonly used sensors: SHT10, BMP085 and MPU6050. I was constantly using those ones over my last projects and I thought it will be a good idea to make a simple module with all of those. They are communicating over I2C and the module can accept voltages from 3V to 6V.

Sensor Stick - [Link]

26 Apr 2014

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Here’s a simple cure for your posture and the back pain blues, a posture sensor by Wingman:

The simplest distance sensors are ultrasonic or infrared sensors. I went with a SR-HC04 because it is cheap and sufficiently precise. There are no special requirements to the controller so I am using an Attiny85. A small piezo speaker provides acoustic feedback to the user. The only thing left is the power supply for which 5V are needed because of the ultrasonic sensor. You could easily use an USB port but I did not want to rely on a computer, 3 button cells deliver around 4,5V and should work for a few days.

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A simple posture sensor - [Link]

22 Apr 2014

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Raj @ embedded-lab.com writes:

A light meter is used to measure the intensity of illumination in a given area. It is widely used in schools, warehouses, factories, hospitals, office buildings, museums, art-galleries, parking garages, stadiums, and many more, to measure and maintain proper lighting levels. The intensity of illumination is usually expressed in Lux or foot-candles. As the 4th project in our chipKIT tutorial series, today we are going to build a digital light meter using the chipKIT Uno32 board and the BH1750 digital light sensor. This project uses Digilent’s chipKIT Basic I/O shield for displaying the measured light intensity in Lux, foot-candles, and Watts/m^2 units.

chipKIT Project 4: Digital light meter - [Link]

22 Apr 2014
Cross-section of piezo button assembly

Cross-section of piezo button assembly

by Francesc Casanellas:

This design was done to get a sealed keypad for very wet environments (in my particular case, showers for swimming pools). The keypad needed to be able to detect slight pressure on a stainless steel plate 0.4mm thick. Apart from water protection, the solution offers an esthetical finish, as the user side is absolutely flat, with nothing visible other than the silkscreened print. Another advantage of this type of keypad is that it is vandal-proof. The core of the sensor is a piezoelectric disc, the type normally used as a buzzer. I chose the Murata 7BB-35-3. With 35mm of external diameter, it allows a sensitive area of about 20mm diameter.

Water & vandal-proof keypad uses piezoelectric disc as sensor and buzzer - [Link]


19 Apr 2014

Low Voltage Metal Sensor directly compatible with Arduino type computers for Robotics, Hobbyists, & Engineers without using magnets.

The Low Power Non Magnetic Inductive Proximity Sensor is a Great way for Engineers, Makers, and DIYs to easily detect low permeability (non iron) metals such as aluminum. Why aluminum? Aluminum is widely available, inexpensive, very thin, and easy to apply. With a small piece of aluminum attached by tape or glue to almost anything, it can be detected by this Low Power Non Magnetic Inductive Proximity Sensor. Other low permeability metals such as copper can also be easily detected. This sensor is not to be confused with low cost magnetic sensors which obviously need magnets to operate.

Low Voltage Metal Sensor for use with Arduino type board - [Link]

16 Apr 2014

What’s inside a Dräger Multiwarn II gas detection warning system used in mining, oil, chemical, and emergency services etc to detect hazardous or explosive atmospheres.
Intrinsic safety design and how both catalytic bead and infrared IR gas detectors work, and pellistors. And a teardown of a Hydrogen Sulfide (H2S) sensor.

EEVblog #603 – Gas Sensor Teardown – Dräger Multiwarn II - [Link]

15 Apr 2014

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This instructable explains how to make a simple smoke detector using and Arduino and a Carbon Monoxide Sensor. The sensor is one of the MQ series gas sensors. Check out the demo here.

Arduino Smoke ‘Detector’ using MQ-7 sensor - [Link]

12 Apr 2014

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The MAX31730 temperature sensor monitors its own temperature and the temperatures of three external diode-connected transistors. The operating supply voltage is from 3.0V to 3.6V. Resistance cancellation compensates for high series resistance in circuit-board traces and the external thermal diode, while beta compensation corrects for temperature-measurement errors due to low-beta sensing transistors.

MAX31730 – 3-Channel Remote Temperature Sensor - [Link]

23 Mar 2014

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The “EasyPlug Shield” for Arduino makes it super easy to connect sensors to your Arduino. The EasyPlug shield provides an incredibly simple, clean, and quick way to connect sensors to your Arduino board. They have sensors for just about anything.

All of our sensors are designed to be easy to use, right out of the box. Plug in a cable (provided) and the sensor is ready to go. We’ve picked the most useful and fun sensors for you. But we’re adding more all the time, so you should be able to find a sensor to fit your needs.

EasyPlug: The Sensor Shield for Arduinos - [Link]

18 Dec 2013

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ricardouvina @ instructables.com writes:

Hello guys! In this instructable I’ll teach you how to make a very simple proximity sensor using infrared LEDs and Arduino.

Simple IR proximity sensor with Arduino - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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