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19 Apr 2014

pwmgen2

This easy-to-build PWM generator project uses the ATtiny45 processor and can be used as a tester for servos. It operates at 5V and can drive maximum PWM load of 1A. [via]

PWM generator and servo tester using ATtiny45 - [Link]

 

26 Feb 2014

photo_2_th

The Arachnoid Mobile Platform is an open source robotics development platform used to make small autonomous moving robots. It can be either configured as a four-legged robot, or as a two wheeled robot. The PCB board holds all the electronics and mechanical components, and also serves as the chassis of the robot.

AMP – Arachnoid Mobile Platform - [Link]

20 Nov 2013

Ray Wang writes:

Hi, I recently built a reflow toaster oven using an Arduino. I know it’s pretty standard stuff, but my version has an automatic oven door opener (using a servo) and circulation fan to speed up the cooling time, and remote notification using an RF transmitter

[via]

Reflow toaster oven using an Arduino - [Link]

1 Aug 2013

F1XDFB6G068M02D.LARGE

Gadget Gangster @ instructables.com writes:

A little bigger than a postage stamp, the Simple Servo Tester lets you control two digital or analog servos without using a transmitter or receiver, just plug in your battery pack to start testing.

Use it to check your servos before installing them into your models or to center your servos when setting up linkages. The Simple Servo Tester can also be tuned to precisely center your servos – Some manufactures consider 1.520 milliseconds to be center while others use 1.500 milliseconds.

Simple Servo Tester - [Link]


19 Jun 2013

servotesterfront-600x427

Trandi made this simple DIY Servo tester based on ATTiny85:

I had to test a RC speed controller that I wanted to use to control an electric car window motor, and for the 100th time I was facing the same dilemma: find 8 batteries for my remote control, dismount the RX part from the quadcopter and use that, OR grab the Arduino and write quickly some code to generate the corresponding signals? Neither of which was actually particularly handy… So I finally decided to build a small stand alone servo tester.

DIY servo tester based on ATTiny85 - [Link]

15 Nov 2012

soldersplash.co.uk folks are creating a 24 channel Servo controller. It’s controllable over SPI or USB and can be stacked on top of our SplashBase board to enable network control. Up to 5 of these can be used to enable control of 120 servos in total.

24 Channel Servo Controller- [Link]

2 Aug 2012

www.adafruit.com writes:

Since we’ve been busy adding quite a few I2C sensors and breakouts lately, I thought this technical overview of the 2-wire “Inter-Integrated Circuit” bus might be handy.  I2C isn’t fast (typically limited to 400kHz in most real-world situations), but it’s convenient since it only requires two pins and more than 120 devices can be connected on the same bus, address space permitting.  For low-pin count devices, it can be a real life-saver since you can hook an OLED display, a DAC, a 7-segment display and 16 servo motors up to your Arduino with a measley two pins and some careful coding!  The full bus specification is available from NXP in UM10204 – the bus was created by Philips, whose semiconductor branch later became NXP — but the more concise information from Embedded Systems Academy might be easier to digest as a starting point.  The FAQ has some very good information in it.

I2C Bus Technical Overview - [Link]

3 Mar 2012

In this project we introduce easy to build, miniature servo controller. This miniature servo controller system is ideal for most of the robotic and mechanical projects. Some of the most notable key features of this project are:

  • Tiny PCB design (35mm × 33mm aprox.) using standard through-hole components.
  • Support for both analog and digital control interfaces.
  • Compatible with most of the servo units.
  • Low cost due to small amount of components.

Mini PIC12F675 Servo Controller - [Link]

2 Feb 2012

Ejberg.dk has developed this project for a simple ATtiny2313 based servo tester – [via]

Ejberg.dk has developed this project for a simple ATtiny2313 based servo tester.

This device lets you test servos by varying the pulse width between limits of 0.8000 ms and 2.2000 ms selectable through the use of four buttons.

While the schematic shows an Atmel AT90S2313, the circuit will work with the popular ATtiny2313 using version 2.05 of the code downloadable from the ejberg site. He also has another version of this tester known as the ServoTester2 which uses the ATmega16P.

ATtiny2313 based servo tester - [Link]

24 Dec 2011

 

Chris @ PyroElectro.com writes:

Searching for a reliable wireless solution for your project can be a real pain if you’re not familiar with current wireless standards, data rates and reliability. The Xbee Modules that we will use in this article are widely available, use a very reliable wireless transmission protocol and have sufficient datarates for most hobby projects.

This article will show you how to build a basic wireless input and output system in the form of a single transmitter and single receiver. Communication will be one way to keep things simple with two xbee modules being used for the wireless link. In the end, a small trimpot will control the movement of a servo motor.

Xbee Wireless Servo Control - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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