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17 Oct 2012

This document covers a few of the applications where lasers can be used during the fabrication of crystalline silicon
(c-Si) solar cells.

Manufacturing c-Si Solar Cells with Lasers - [Link]

25 Sep 2012

tinkerlog writes:

We all know, we should use more renewable energy. Here is my contribution. Use solar power if you want to cut 20mm wooden rods. And plan ahead because it may take a while.

The Almost Useless Machine - [Link]

17 Aug 2012

Chris Glaser writes:

Many solar-panel-powered applications need only pulses of power to operate. Systems for data collection or measurement sampling frequently need to turn on, perform a measurement or some other task, transmit the processed or measured data, and return to sleep. In many cases, wirelessly transmitting the data consumes the largest portion of output power. These required power pulses, either for the system itself or for transmitting data, typically are difficult to support with a power-limited supply such as a solar panel. By operating at the solar panel’s maximum power point (MPP) and by intelligently drawing the power from the panel, energy can be successfully harnessed to power a pulsed load. This article presents a simple and costeffective solution for maximum-power-point tracking (MPPT) for use in such pulsed-load systems.

Easy solar-panel maximum-power-point tracking for pulsed-load applications - [Link]

2 Aug 2012

Brian Dorey.com | Raspberry Pi Solar Data Logger – [via]

The Raspberry Pi solar data logger project is now live and is the latest version of our previous data logging systems using Arduino and Android + IOIO board projects.

The data is used on a custom reporting website onhome.briandorey.com and also on Android and iPad tablet apps.

The Raspberry Pi is used as a data processing and uploading system which pulls data from the following sensors and then uploads to a web server via HTTP GET.

Pi Solar Data Logger - [Link]


22 Jun 2012

Electrical engineers of the University of Princeton are working on a cheap solar-powered charging system that can be printed on plastic and that transfers the produced electricity wirelessly. The solar cells are made from amorphous silicon (a-Si), a non-crystalline form of silicon. Crystalline silicon (c-Si) is much more efficient when it comes to converting sunlight into electricity but a-Si has the advantage that it can be processed at much lower temperatures (75 °C against 300 °C for c-Si), allowing it to be printed on plastic sheets.

The electric circuit is made out of the same material as the solar cells. And although a-Si has a lower electrical performance than c-Si, when it comes to producing cheap electricity-generating plastic sheet which can be put up anywhere, a-Si is best. By making the charging system available at a large scale, the Princeton engineers aim to have wireless electricity everywhere. [via]

Omnipresent Sun-Powered Wireless Charging Stations - [Link]

1 Jun 2012

SolarCharge 200ds230 rev 2 – An unconventional, scalable high efficiency 12V solar power system, a battery charge controller with low voltage cutout to protect the battery. [via]

An unconventional, scalable high efficiency 12V solar power system and battery charge controller with low voltage cutout to protect the battery. (ideal for systems of 50W or less).

The most common solar charger consists of a Schottky diode to prevent the battery from draining into the PV panel and a shunt regulator that effectively short circuits the panel once the battery is fully charged.
One problem with this approach is diode losses and the resulting heat. If a 50W 12V panel supplies 4A to the battery, the Schottky diode will drop about 0,4V across it dissipating about 1,6W of heat. This requires a heat sink and loses power to heat. The problem is that there is no way of reducing the volt drop, paralleling diodes may share current, but the 0,4V will still be there. The circuit uses a MOSFET in stead of the usual diode and the primary power loss is resistive.

Scalable 12V solar power system and battery charge controller - [Link]

19 Apr 2012

Arup Basak writes: [via]

O.S.S.D.A.S v1 stands for Open Source Solar Data Acquisition System. I have been working on this project since last few months. The picture above is the not the first prototype, but the first working prototype that looks like quite complete. There will be further revisions to the hardware and software for best efficiency and accurate results. Moreover, the recorded digital data should be rich enough to reflect the real world data’s mirror.

Features:

  • Logs everything into attached SD card for data analysis in PC. A typical 1GB SD card can store years of data. Data is recorded in frequency of few seconds. Enough to plot a graph to analyze performance of short periods of ten minutes too.
  • Keep track of the solar panel voltage, battery voltage, charge current and other parameters
  • Keeps track of other data such as temperature, etc
  • Can work without the LCD and still record information to the SD card and vice versa.

Open Source Solar Data Acquisition System - [Link]

6 Apr 2012

Steve Taranovich writes:

Home energy systems based on renewable sources, such as solar and wind power, are becoming more popular among consumers and will gain increasing support from governmental bodies.

In this article, the power inverter will be discussed in the context of solar energy, especially as it relates to the latest, low power microinverter architectures that make the most sense in converting a photovoltaic (PV) panel’s DC output to an AC signal for residential use.

Microinverters are installed on each individual PV panel and typically handle 300 W. Microinverters provide the benefit of scalability for those who want to start small, yet have full DC/AC conversion with maximum power point tracking (MPPT). Many people want to put their excess power back onto the power grid, which will speed up the return on investment (ROI) time and ultimately could lead to freedom from grid reliance. The technology that will enable ubiquitous architectures like this on our roof is getting closer.

An Engineer’s Guide to Power Inverters for Solar Energy Harvesting - [Link]

30 Mar 2012

The internet community quite enjoying the destabilizing effects of global connectivity on the status quo, fights any attempt at restriction tooth and nail. Organizing themselves both on- and offline they managed to stop anti-piracy laws like the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) or the Protect IP Act (PIPA) from passing. But it wouldn’t be the internet community if people weren’t working on technological solutions as well. Hackers, engineers and freedom-loving folk are working to create a decentralized, independent network where you can’t stop the signal. [via]

Build a Solar Powered Wikipedia Server - [Link]

9 Mar 2012

Energy harvesting with a photovoltaic cell requires an efficient dc-dc converter that operates with very low voltage inputs and whose output can charge an external battery. The newly introduced LTC3105 meets these requirements.

Sam Davis writes:

ENERGY HARVESTING CAN EMPLOY SURPLUS OR AMBIENT energy to trickle charge a battery that supplies system power. This eliminates the need to for an ac power line-based recharging circuit, which may be impractical in a remote application. Typically, these applications require very low average power, but can require periodic pulses of higher load current. The Linear Technology LTC3105 is intended for these types of energy harvesting applications.

The LTC3105 is a high efficiency dc-dc boost converter (Fig. 1) that has a 250mVstart-up capability. A resistor divider connected between the VOUT and FB pins adjusts the converter output from 1.5V to 5.25V. An integrated maximum power point controller (MPPC) optimizes performance from photovoltaic (PV) cell inputs. The LT3105’s 3mm × 3mm DFN package (or MSOP-12) and very small external components offer a compact solution for energy harvesting.

LTC3105 DC-DC Boost Converter Harvests Photovoltaic Energy - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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