Home Blog  





29 Oct 2014

voice_echo_Pic

A project has been designed around Holteks Ht8970 voice echo IC. Project can be used in various audio systems karaoke, toys, animatronics, show, display, exhibitions, and sound equipment’s.

The HT8970 is an echo/surround effect processor. It is designed for various audio systems including karaoke, television, sound equipment’s, etc. The chip consists of a built-in pre-amplifier, VCO or Voltage Control OSC, 20Kb SRAM, A/D and D/A converters as well as delay time control logic.

Voice Echo - [Link]

14 Sep 2014

NewImage127

Researchers say they have captured the sound of a single moving atom.

Researchers at Columbia University and Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology say that they have, for the first time, “captured” the sound a single atom makes when it moves around—a single “phonon,” as it were. It’s an achievement that could eventually be used as the basic science for new quantum computing devices.

Like everyone is taught in elementary school, anytime something moves or vibrates, it makes a sound. Scientists now know for sure that that principle extends down to the lowly atom.

“The sound amplitude, or strength, is very weak,” said Göran Johansson, a co-author of the paper published today in Science. “Basically, when you excite the atom, it creates a sound, one phonon at a time, according to theory. It’s the weakest possible sound possible at the frequency [that it vibrates].”

Scientists Have Captured the Sound One Atom Makes - [Link]

24 Jul 2014

photo

Clap switch/Sound-activated switch designed around op-amp, flip-flop and popular 555 IC. Switch avoids false triggering by using 2-clap sound. Clapping sound is received by a microphone, the microphone changes the sound wave to electrical wave which is further amplified by op-amp.

555 timer IC acts as mono-stable multi-vibrator then flip-flop changes the state of output relay on every two-clap sound. This can be used to turn ON/OFF lights and fans. Circuit activates upon two-clap sound and stays activated until another sound triggers the circuit.

Sound Activated Switch - [Link]

25 Feb 2012

Viktor made a sound trigger for his DSLR camera:

Now that I can take pictures of lightning I decided that I also want to be able to trigger my camera with sound.

An op-amp filters and amplifies a microphone signal. The output is fed to a PIC microcontroller that triggers the flash when the sound reaches a certain level. The trigger sound level and shutter delay are set with a pot.  [via]

Lil Bang – Sound trigger for cameras - [Link]


31 Oct 2011

This circuit is a digital sound level meter with a LCD screen, capable of displaying 80 characters (4 rows with 20 characters on each). You can build this LCD display. It also provides more debugging information, such as the minimum and maximum analog-to-digital samples that were measured during each period. [via]

Digital Sound Level Meter - [Link]

26 Oct 2011

enide.net writes:

This project makes a PIC microcontroller speak audio PCM sounds using PWM modulation! Pulse-code modulation (PCM) is a digital representation of an analog signal where the magnitude of the signal is sampled regularly at uniform intervals, then quantized to a series of symbols in a digital (usually binary) code [1]. Pulse-width modulation (PWM) of a signal or power source involves the modulation of its duty cycle, to either convey information over a communications channel or control the amount of power sent to a load [2].

PIC sound player (PCM to PWM converter) - [Link]

15 May 2011

Fileark writes:

Here is a Sound Localization Sensor that I made. I searched for days trying to find a commercial sound localization sensor or info on how to build one. Sound localization is what the human ear does when it determines that a sound is coming from the left or right. After talking to some gentlemen over at the Arduino forums, I realized that it wasn’t going to be as simple as I thought.

DIY Sound Localization Sensor – [Link]

9 Apr 2011

circuitgeek.com writes:

Generating sound waves from PC sound card isn’t new ting. You can even download tons of software that allows generating various waves like sine, square, triangle waves on speaker output. Such sound generator gives quite good results that are acceptable in most situations like testing audio equipment or feeding complex signals in to your projects.

Generating complex sound waves on PC – [Link]

30 Sep 2008

The Daisy is a multipurpose sound player for embedded applications. It can be used as a standalone personal music player,as the sound for an art project, in a kiosk, as a museum tour guide, in a toy, or anywhere that high quality embedded audio is desired. It uses MMC or SD flash memory cards so storage size is unlimited. It has several interface modes for either human or machine control.

The Daisy is based on the Microchip PIC18F45j10, which is a new family of PIC microcontrollers. They are capable of running at a full 40MHz at 3.3 volts, which makes them ideal for this application. Also, most of the pins are 5 volt tolerant, easing interface with other microcontrollers. The other chip on board is a VS1011 from VLSI, Finland. It is an .mp3 and .wav decoder chip, a DAC, and a headphone amplifier all in one 28 pin package. I’ve been fooling around with this family of decoders since 2001 and I have never found an mp3 file it couldn’t decode… and the sound is very good!

Daisy mp3 project – [Link]

23 Apr 2008

Make a sound card is no more a complex issue. If you use great IC PCM2702 from BURR BROWN / Texas Instruments you can create a fully functional USB sound card. This sound card can be powered from USB port and has one stereo output. You don’t need to install any driver for Windows XP and Vista, because they are already inside. This is really plug and play.

USB Sound Card with PCM2702 – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits