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17 Apr 2015

20150413011804-nextion_r4_c2

Objective-oriented display solution, to reduce the GUI development difficulty and shorten the cycle.

Nextion is a Seamless Human Machine Interface (HMI) solution that provides a control and visualisation interface between a human and a process, machine, application or appliance. Nextion is mainly applied to IoT or consumer electronics field. It is the best solution to replace the traditional LCD and LED Nixie tube.

This solution includes hardware part – a series of TFT boards and software part – Nextion editor. Nextion TFT board uses only one serial port to do communicating. Let you get rid of the wiring trouble. We notice that most engineers spend much time in application development but get unpleasant results. In this situation, Nextion editor has mass components such as button, text, progress bar, slider, instrument panel etc. to enrich your interface design. And the drag-and-drop function ensures that you spend less time in programming, which will reduce your 99% development workloads. With the help of this WYSIWYG editor, GUI designing is a piece of cake.

Nextion: a cost-effective high-performance TFT HMI – [Link]

31 Mar 2015

obr1666_1

Simply applicable graphic platform FTDI EVE simplifies development thanks to immediately-usable display modules with capacitive touch panels.

FTDI „Embedded Video Engine“ (EVE) platform may be familiar to you from our article like „Be in plus with a graphic platform FTDI VM800P “.

FT800, as a powerful graphic platform with minimum requirements for a host MCU will meet your requirements with a high probability. Into the final application, you´ll probably use only the “heart of the system” itself – chip FT800 (supporting resistive touch panels) or chip FT801 (supporting capacitive panels) but for the beginning it´s certainly a good idea to start with a suitable module, which only needs to be switched-on and it´s possible to start writing and evaluating a SW application.

Thanks to ready-made modules series VM801 nothing prevents you from trying this platform in your application.. VM801 series modules are available in 2 variants:

  • VM801B – „basic“ module with the FT801 chip, display and accessory circuits. It is a basic module for evaluation of applications. Its main benefit is that you don´t need to design a PCB but you have a well-tried functional unit with a display and also a precise bezel.
  • VM801P – „plus“ module with the FT801 and the AtMEGA328P/16MHz microcontroller. A powerful module capable of a standalone operation, also supporting Arduino libraries.

Further, VM801 are available with 4,3“ as well as 5“ displays (480×272 px), both with capacitive touch panel. Modules VM801 are suitable for development, but also for a small-series production, when it´s simpler and cheaper to use such a module than to develop all the hardware portion. Detailed description can be found in the VM801B and VM801P datasheets.

Immediately available TFT modules with capacitive touch panels – [Link]

4 Feb 2015

isscc001

by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Researchers at IMEC have produced an 8-bit microprocessor that runs at 2.1 kHz. That is not a typing error for GHz; 2.1 kHz is a breakthrough speed in this instance because the transistors that make up the processor’s logic are entirely fabricated in low-temperature organic materials. Possible areas of application include high-volume printing of RFID tags.

Belgium’s Holst Centre, IMEC and their partner Evonik have fabricated a general-purpose 8-bit microprocessor using complementary thin-film transistors (TFTs) processed at temperatures up to 250 °C, compatible with plastic foil substrates. The “hybrid” technology integrates two types of semiconductors – metal-oxide for n-type TFTs (from materials companies iXsenic and Evonik) and organic molecules for p-type TFTs – in a CMOS microprocessor circuit, operating at a clock frequency unprecedented for TFT technologies of 2.1kHz. The results were published online in Scientific Reports.

7 Jan 2015

sytadin_02

by weirdlab.fr:

This will help to see the state of roads, in live, just need to load your favorite (urban or not) traffic map.

To use the touch screen, we run under a Raspbian distribution, you can download the image file here already configured to work with the XPT2046 LCD Control (most common 3.2 TFT found on ebay) . Extract the image file on a 2Gb mini SD Card, and run the setup config.

Real-Time traffic state with Raspberry Pi in your car – [Link]


26 Dec 2014

obr1647_1

New 3,2“ and 3,5“ displays from company 4D Systems intended for Raspberry Pi are able to make a complete standalone system from this microcomputer.

Graphic output is always beneficial, enabling to use embedded microcomputer as a user interface (HMI) or at least to display various variables etc. There are many ways to reach it, but probably the most desirable solution would be to connect a display and nothing to solve.

New graphic modules 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 belong right to this group of ideal solutions, as they´re directly designed for Raspberry Pi (A,B, B+) – electrically and mechanically, while the I/O connector remains still available.

Simplicity of usage is empowered by a fact, that they don´t require (external) power supply, as they´re powered from the computer itself. Communication is done through a high speed 48 MHz SPI connection. Speed of a built-in processor enables displaying of pictures and videos with up 25 fps speed (even more if images can be compressed). Resistive touch panel enables operation of the whole system without a mouse.

As for the size, there´s only a small difference between 4DPi-32 a 4DPi-35 modules – the biggest difference is in resolution 480 x 320 px (4DPI-35) vs. 320×240 px (4Dpi-32). Both displays display GUI (primary) output of the Raspberry Pi – the same as if we had a monitor connected.

These novelties are already our stable stock item. Detailed information will provide you the 4DPi-32 and 4DPi-35 datasheets.

Add the 4-th dimension to your Raspberry Pi – [Link]

24 Dec 2014

An Arduino pulse sensor project from Bajdi:

I found a little heart rate sensor @ ICstation. It is a clone of the open hardware pulse sensor. The sensor is well documented, and it comes with Arduino and Processing example code.
To try it out I connected the sensor to an ATmega328 running at 3.3V and loaded the example Arduino code. I could now see my heart beat on the Arduino serial monitor :)
I then connected a 2.2″ TFT display to the Arduino and tried to figure out how to display the sensor output on it. Sounds simple but unfortunately it isn’t. Updating the full screen (320×240 pixels) is really slow. So I needed some smarter code to update only the pixels that needed to change. I happened to stumble on Matthew McMillans blog, he wrote some smart code to use a similar display as a speedometer. So I borrowed some of his code and mixed it with the example code of the pulse sensor. You can see the result in the above video.

[via]

Arduino heart rate sensor – [Link]

19 Dec 2014

ultralowpowe

by Hanne Degans @ phys.org:

At this week’s IEDM 2014, held in San Francisco, California, nanoelectronics research center imec demonstrated an ultra-low power RFID transponder chip. Operating at sub 1V voltage and realized in thin-film transistor technology (TFTs) on plastic film, the chip paves the way for universal sensing applications, such as item level RFID tagging, body area networks (BAN) and environmental monitoring, that require prolonged remote autonomy, and ultimate thinness, flexibility and robustness.

One of the major drivers of the semiconductor industry is the Internet of Things (IoT). Market studies envision a society where billions of autonomous sensor nodes are seamlessly integrated into objects, in the environment and on human bodies, operating independently for months, interacting with each other and connecting to the internet. This IoT is expected to improve and enhance daily-lives through smart houses and smart cars, personal health monitoring and much more.

Ultralow-power RFID transponder chip in thin-film transistor technology on plastic – [Link]

12 Nov 2014

While TFTs have been the mainstay of displays for years, OLEDs are becoming more prevalent as their price drops due to the phenomenal increase in quality from TFT to OLED technology. We received this demo board from Newhaven that effectively illustrates side by side the differences between TFT and OLED technology, using a 1.69 inch 160 x 128 OLED display and a 1.8 inch 160 by 128 TFT display.

Tech Lab – Newhaven Full Color OLED Displays – [Link]

21 Oct 2014

TFT-LCD_3-600x374

LG Display has an excellent article on how they build TFT LCD displays:

Ever wondered how the TV and monitor displays you use every day work? The TFT-LCD manufacturing process consists of a set of processes for producing TFT, color filtering, cell, module and others. LG Display Newsroom gives a detailed, but easy to follow explanation of the entire steps below.

Let’s take a closer look at the production process for a TFT board, the bottom-most layer of an LCD panel. The image above depicts a TFT board, which consists of rows of small rectangular sections that together resembles a chessboard. Each rectangular section is a pixel, and each pixel contains a transistor that controls its function. The TFT process is the process that builds these transistors on top of a glass substrate.

[via]

TFT-LCD Production Process Explained – [Link]

26 Sep 2014

FIBMI6CI0C8XQQD.MEDIUM

by Sound Guy @ instructables.com:

You may be familiar with a website in the UK called Colour Clock (http://thecolourclock.co.uk/) which converts the time into a hex value and then uses that value to update the background color. It’s very hypnotic and once you get used to how it works you can actually tell where you are in the day just by glancing at the screen from across the room.

I had an Arduino Uno R3 and an Adafruit 1.8″ Color TFT Shield w/microSD and Joystick that I was trying to use for another project that kept stalling out. One night just for fun I decided to see if I could recreate the Colour Clock and it only took a couple hours. If you’re familiar with Arduino you could easily swap parts out for a simple TFT breakout board and something tiny like a Beetle and make a very compact unit. You could even wear it as a badge.

Arduino TFT Color Clock – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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