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15 Dec 2012

article-2012november-managing-the-energy-and-fig1

Bryon Moyer writes:

The development of wireless sensing technology has made possible tasks that would have been unthinkable in years past. Sensors can be installed where it is impractical or impossible to run a communication wire; their ability to communicate wirelessly, as long as they are within range of a hub, means that it is possible to gather data in places or situations that were previously inaccessible.

The inability to run a communication wire to the sensor also means no power line as well. Sensors need power both to sense and to communicate, so that has typically meant using a primary battery. While you would presumably select a battery with as long a life as possible, the battery is still unlikely to outlast the life of the sensor, meaning that someone will have to go out and replace the battery at some point – which can be expensive.

Managing the Energy and Lifetimes of Thin-Film Batteries - [Link]

8 Feb 2012

Thinfilm Electronics and PARC developed a technology for printing semiconductors onto a plastic film – [via]

Last month, a small Norwegian company called Thinfilm Electronics and PARC, the storied Silicon Valley research lab, jointly showed off a technological first—a plastic film that combined both printed transistors and printed digital memory.

Such flexible electronics could be an important component of future products, such as food packaging that senses and record temperatures, shock-sensing helmets, as well as smart toys. But the story of how PARC’s technology—the printed transistors—wound up paired with memory technology from an obscure Norwegian company also provides a window onto a 10-year struggle by Xerox to transform the way it commercializes R&D ideas.

Logic circuits and computer memory are printed together on a sheet of plastic - [Link]

25 Dec 2011

The Comeback of Xerox PARC @ Technology Review – [via]

Last month, a small Norwegian company called Thinfilm Electronics and PARC, the storied Silicon Valley research lab, jointly showed off a technological first—a plastic film that combined both printed transistors and printed digital memory.

Such flexible electronics could be an important component of future products, such as food packaging that senses and record temperatures, shock-sensing helmets, as well as smart toys. But the story of how PARC’s technology—the printed transistors—wound up paired with memory technology from an obscure Norwegian company also provides a window onto a 10-year struggle by Xerox to transform the way it commercializes R&D ideas.

For most of its 40-year history, PARC (for Palo Alto Research Center) was as famous for squandering new technologies as it was for inventing them. The mouse, the graphical user interface, and the drop-down menu were all born at PARC—but it was Apple and Microsoft that commercialized them and made them cornerstone inventions of the PC industry.

The Comeback of Xerox PARC - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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