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19 Jun 2014

rcj_Knowles_MEMS_Ultrasonic_Microphone_2

Ultrasonic MEMS microphones can image where your hands are without touching the screen, adding a new dimension of 3-D gesture control to smartphones and tablets: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

Ultrasonic Mic Adds 3-D Mid-Air Control to Smartphones and Tablets – [Link]

14 May 2014

HC-SR04-ultrasonic-range-finder

by praveen @ circuitstoday.com:

Ultrasonic range finder using 8051 microcontroller has been already published by me in this website. This time it is an ultrasonic range finder using arduino. HC-SR04 ultrasonic range finder module is used as the sensor here. The display consists of a three digit multiplexed seven segment display. This range finder can measure up to 200 cm and has an accuracy of 1cm. There is an option for displaying the distance in inch also. Typical applications of this range finder are parking sensors, obstacle warning system, level controllers, terrain monitoring devices etc. Lets have a look at the HC-SR04 ultrasonic module first.

Ultrasonic range finder using arduino - [Link]

19 Apr 2014

FBPCCKMHTJPA22G.LARGE

Jan_Henrik @ instructables.com writes:

In this project i want to show and explain you a range sensor with ultrasonic and a 20×04 lcd screen. I wrote the code for this project myself and added lots of comments, so that everybody can understand it and use it for other projects (maybe a light range sensor?!). It is easy to build and much more easier to program, it just requires a few cheap parts and can run on battery, for a portable rangefinder.

The maximum rated range is 500 cm, the range is measured 20 times per seccond. It is Displayed on a lcd screen which is 20×4 chars big, it has a custom start message, and it can have a custom design while measuring. It will have a backlight LED and can run on every arduino, which has I²C communication. That mean you can run it on an Arduino nano, which is very small. It also requires 5V so it has to be a 5V version of an Arduino.

Arduino ultrasonic range finder - [Link]

11 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Tronixstuff has posted a tutorial explaining how to use the Parallax Ping sensor with Arduino. The Ping is an ultrasonic distance sensor from Parallax which retails or about $30.

This segment is the latest in a series of Arduino tutorials posted by Tronixstuff.

Tutorial: using Ping ultrasonic sensor with Arduino - [Link]


3 Feb 2012

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

Zipppys123 is building a DIY ultrasonic range finder based on this design. Once it’s externally triggered a PIC12C508 is used to generate generate the ultrasonic pulse, and measure its echo.

The ultrasonic pulse is amplified using a MAX232 TTL-to-RS-232 level converter, while the echo is amplified and demodulated using two op-amps and comparators.

DIY ultrasonic range finder - [Link]

10 Sep 2011

Meridith Perry, a recent graduate of the University of Pennsylvania (USA), has developed a novel method for powering electronic devices wirelessly. Christened ‘uBeam’, the method uses ultrasonic energy that is beamed from a mains-powered transmitter to a piezoelectric receiver plugged into the device to be powered.

Ms Perry came up with the idea for the uBeam system while still at university, when she forgot to take the charger for her laptop computer to a lecture and was left with a dead battery. She started thinking about ways to transmit energy wirelessly and ultimately came up with the idea of ultrasonic transmission. [via]

Novel ultrasound system provides wireless power - [Link]

28 Apr 2011

The Park Ranger is an ultrasonic-ranging prototype designed to assist drivers who are backing into tight areas.  The ranger uses ultrasonic pings to measure distance to the object behind and indicates this distance by sending audible tones to your FM radio.  Optional panel-mount LEDs offer visual aid for calibration as well as warning drivers behind you.

The intention of this project is to demonstrate the Amani64ʼs ability to serve as a rapid-prototyping tool for applications typically covered by proprietary modules.  While a commercial ultrasonic-ranging module could be used in this project, the Amani64 is used in instead to tailor the system to our exact needs.  The user can drop in blocks of IP, whether open-source or their own, to create a custom application over which they have full control and ownership.  A CPLD-based prototyping board is useful for any application that requires logical circuits, whether they be parallel or sequential, that space, cost, and vendor-delivery times are a concern.

DIY Park Ranger – [Link]

 

31 Jan 2011

This project is a 3-dimensional ultrasonic computer mouse known as Magic Mouse which can be worn as a ring on one finger. [via]

Ring-Designed 3D Air-Mouse – [Link]

28 Jan 2011

This project is an ultrasonic bat detector using only a PIC12F683, a piezo receiver and a piezo speaker. Source code and schematic are available on the link below. [via]

picoBAT – an ultrasonic bat detector – [Link]

25 Jan 2011

Kerry Wong needed some ultrasonic range finders for a project so he build his own. He writes:

The theory behind ultrasonic ranging is quite simple. Typically a short ultrasonic burst is transmitted from the transmitter. When there is an object in the path of the ultrasonic pulse, some portion of the transmitted ultrasonic wave is reflected and the ultrasonic receiver can detect such echo.

He provides schematic and code on the link below.

A Sensitive DIY Ultrasonic Range Sensor - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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